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Boys & Girls Clubs of Door County and Greater Green Bay merging

You will see two regional youth organizations combining forces shortly. On Friday, the Boys & Girls Club of Door County announced that it would be merging with the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Green Bay on March 1. The merger will not cause any location closures or staff layoffs, according to the Clubs.


In a statement, Boys & Girls Club of Door County Board Chair Erich Pfiefer said, “While we believe strongly in the power of coming together, great care is being taken to ensure that both Clubs remain connected to their respective communities. We are committed to providing the same high-quality services that have been the hallmark of both organizations for decades.”


The merger will mean that over 3,000 youth and families will be served, making the combined clubs one of the largest youth development agencies in Northeastern Wisconsin.  Each club will keep its name and branding for Door County and Green Bay.

Kewaunee County manure case moved to March

A Kewaunee County farmer and two associates will have another month to prepare for their upcoming case involving their manure handling procedures.

 

According to court records, the complaint against farmer Johannes Wakker, manure hauler Gregory Stodola, and crop consultant Benjamin Koss were amended on Wednesday. The amended complaint only applies to Stodola and his company, Stodola Ag Transport. Stodola is the only one of the three facing misdemeanor charges for polluting a waterway. Wakker, Koss, and Stodola are all facing felony charges for conspiring to commit a crime and falsifying written records related to the farm’s nutrient management plan.  On Friday, additional correspondence was submitted, and the court date was moved from February 1st to March 7th.

 

The original complaint alleged Stodola far exceeded the manure spread on his farmland in late 2019. The amount so far exceeded what Wakker’s permit allowed, resulting in pollution discharges into tributaries leading to Lake Michigan with E. Coli bacteria readings as much as 100 times that would result in the closure of a public beach. The DOJ complaint further states that Stodola created a document that grossly underreported the manure spread by over 1.9 million gallons.

 

The court case will begin with an initial hearing with Judge David Weber presiding on March 7th at 10:30 a.m.


Washington Island School prepared for upcoming referendum

If you live on Washington Island and the upcoming school district referendum is approved, you will not see your mill rate on your property taxes go up by more than a few pennies. 

 

The Washington Island School District Board approved the language for its forthcoming recurring referendum, which has become a biennial rite of spring on the island. If approved, the operational referendum would allow the school district budget to exceed the revenue limit by $935,000 for the 2023-2024 school year and $935,000 for the 2024-2025 school year. For taxpayers, the mill rate would increase from its current $4.04 two cents in its first year ($4.06) and an additional cent ($4.07) the following year. Washington Island residents, which carry the brunt of the school’s funding, approved the district to exceed the revenue limit by $775,000 in its last referendum vote two years ago. The question will appear on the spring election ballot on April 4th.

 

Green Bay airport flying high after growth

Customer demand is helping you see more planes leave Green Bay’s Austin Straubel Airport. The airport saw passenger traffic rise more than 14 percent in 2022 over 2021 as airports worldwide inch closer to pre-pandemic levels. According to Aviation Week, passenger traffic worldwide reached 70 percent of its pre-pandemic traffic in 2021, which could rise as high as 85 percent in 2023. Planes leaving Austin Straubel Airport are 90 percent full, something Airport Director Marty Piette says is exceeding the national average.

Airline carriers have also noticed the increased demand for flights arriving to and departing from Austin Straubel Airport. In the coming months, you will see larger planes from Delta serving Green Bay flights to Atlanta and more flights between the city and Detroit. Frontier is also prepared to resume its non-stop flights between Green Bay and Denver next month.


Brutal cold enters the area next week

Make sure you throw on an extra sweater and a thicker pair of socks when you go outside next week. The National Weather Service is predicting the area’s coldest weather since last Christmas, when wind chills were below freezing. Beginning on Sunday night, low temperatures will struggle to stay above zero degrees, with negative readings predicted for Monday and Wednesday. With colder temperatures comes harder working furnaces, and Jeff Blemke from Ultimate Air in Luxemburg suggests you make sure your filters are clean now to save your units from wearing out faster.

Holding your home’s temperature steady, reversing the flow of your ceiling fans, and clearing obstructions away from your air vents are other ways to stay comfortable without taxing your unit. Single-digit temperatures and potential negative windchills are predicted to last through at least Thursday.

Door County Habitat for Humanity kicks off 30th anniversary with celebration campaign

Your support can help make Door County Habitat for Humanity’s 30th year one to remember with big goals on the horizon. Thursday marked the organization’s kickoff for its anniversary campaign as it hopes to raise $30,000 over the next 30 days. Two new homes, 50 home repair projects, 20 deconstruction projects, and expanding its campus are just some of the organization’s goals for 2023. Executive Director Lori Allen says she knows the goals are lofty, but so are the affordable housing needs in Door County.

Even with volunteers providing the labor, building costs for homes built by Door County Habitat for Humanity are approximately $200,000. The Door County Habitat for Humanity 30th Anniversary Campaign, which will include special events at its ReStore, runs until February 28th. 

Door Shakespeare announces 2023 season

You will be able to catch one of William Shakespeare’s plays under the stars in Baileys Harbor this summer. Door Shakespeare announced on Thursday it will be presenting Shakespeare’s As You Like It and the PigPen Theatre Company's  The Old Man and The Old Moon. Producing Artistic Director Amy Ensign, entering her first season in the new role, said this season is full of joy.

 

“It is a celebration of who we are and the journeys we take to get there. It explores challenges that lead to discovery and a deeper understanding of person and place.”

 

She can’t wait for the stories to take shape when Door Shakespeare returns to its home at Bjorklunden in Baileys Harbor. Leda Hoffmann and Scott MacKenna Campbell will return to Door County to direct the productions. Door Shakespeare’s 27th season will run from June 28th through August 27th.

 

Correction: It was previously written that The Old Man and The Old Moon was written by William Shakespeare. The story now reflect that change.

Bookings go up at Kewaunee County Jail

You would have seen more people get processed at the state’s small jail in 2022, according to Kewaunee County Sheriff Matt Joski. A total of 710 people were processed at the Kewaunee County Jail, up from 628 in 2021. Nearly half of those were non-custody bookings, which occur when a person is not physically arrested, and the offense was not immediately reported. Joski says it is just a sign of the county coming out of the pandemic.

The Kewaunee County Jail’s average population exceeded its maximum again in 2022. The average population was just over 30 people, approximately eight more than what is usually allowed. To help juggle its numbers, Joski says electronic monitoring and sending many female inmates to Door County are just some ways it helps balance its population. It also shows how much the new jail will be needed.

Staffed by 14 deputies, the department’s jail division doubles as its dispatchers. That role will continue even when the new facility is built in the coming years. You can dive deeper into the numbers from the jail division below.

 

FROM SHERIFF JOSKI

In this week’s article I would like to continue my yearend report by sharing some information and data in regards to our Jail facility. The current Kewaunee County Jail was built in 1968. It has a housing capacity of 22 with three short-term holding cells which brings the total to 25. By law a county jail is intended to hold sentenced individuals for up to one year. Any sentences beyond one year are remanded to a state correctional facility. While we do hold the title of the oldest and smallest jail in the State of Wisconsin, I am deeply grateful to the County Board and the community in general for the support which has been provided in regards to the planning and ultimate updating of our facility. I will keep providing updates on that planning process in upcoming articles as that process continues.

         

The Jail is staffed by 14 Deputies, who carry out the various duties which are set forth by state statute, federal law, as well as department policy. These men and women are also tasked with the duties of Dispatcher which is very unique in the State of Wisconsin. I believe that there are only a handful of Departments which are still configured in this manner and it speaks volumes as to the professionalism and competence of these men and women.

           

Every person arrested in Kewaunee County is processed through our jail and the following are some of the most common criteria for bookings, which for 2022 were a total of 710 compared to 628 from the previous year.

         

The first is that we call non- custody bookings. These are bookings that occur when the individual is not physically arrested. This may be in the case where the offense was not immediately reported, and it is through investigations that the probable cause for an arrest summons was completed. It could also be where we are not able to locate the suspect at the time of the event, and we are able to send charges up to the District Attorney’s Office for his consideration. These bookings accounted for 339, as compared to 309 of the total bookings in 2021.

          

The next most frequent category is pre-sentence bookings which totaled 214, in comparison to 132 last year. These are bookings which are for those who are currently awaiting the completion of their court process but do not meet bail criteria. These can be some of our lengthiest stays as the legal process itself is complex and lengthy at times.

            

In third place we have a tie between warrant pickups and probation holds. These two are actually quite similar as they are the result of a failure to comply with either a court order in the case of warrants or probation rules in the case of Community Corrections. These tend to be our shortest stays. But account for a great deal of the total bookings. If you have found yourself within the courts system it is vital that you understand and comply with the various courts dates as well as requirements so as to avoid being one the unfortunate within this category. The same is true for probation clients. Many of those on probation forget that this is a privilege and an alternative to incarceration which brings with it many rules. It is incumbent on the individual to know and comply with these rules to avoid a return visit to jail or in some cases a state correctional facility.

       

So many ask what our daily population is here in Kewaunee County. Over the past few years, we have had various factors impact our Jail’s daily population. The first of course were the effects of the pandemic, coupled with the transition from one Circuit Court Judge to another. Both of these have impacted our daily population and extended some stays beyond the traditional time period. As I stated earlier, our maximum capacity is 22 and for 2022 our daily population average was 30.51 with males representing 26.24 and females 4.25 throughout the year. as compared to 2021 which was 29.22 with males representing 24.17 and females 5.05 throughout the year. The average stay is approx. 8 days with the shortest stay at approx. 1 hour and the longest stay at 365 days.

       

To meet the daily overcrowding in our facility we make use of two primary resources; out of county facilities, primarily Door County, and the use of electronic monitoring. For the most part those who we send to Door County are the female inmates which take pressure off of our scheduling requirements to have both male and female staffing when we have females in our facility. Electronic monitoring is utilized for those who have been granted work release by the courts and meet the many requirements we have to guarantee compliance in return for this privilege. I want to acknowledge Lt. Chris VanErem our Jail Administrator for the amazing work that he and his staff do on a daily basis to balance the constant demands of the inmates, the courts, and the many regulations with the limited resources both in budget and facility.

         

Along with the duties of Jailer and Dispatcher, these men and women also facilitate all of the transports which are required not only locally but many times across the state to bring inmates to Kewaunee County for court as well as monitoring the Huber Program (Work Release) and Court Security. These men and women give multi tasking a whole new dimension and we are fortunate to have them serving in these roles to keep our community safe. Contrary to some beliefs, these Deputies are Law Enforcement Officers just as their counterparts in Patrol and Investigations and are a vital component of the Criminal Justice System. Next week I will share some information from 2022 as it relates to our Patrol Division.

             

Legislative Days continues in 2023

After a primarily virtual edition in 2021, you will be able to advocate for your communities as a part of the Door County/Kewaunee County Legislative Days delegation. Members of the steering committee have been meeting to discuss various issues they would like to bring up to legislators when they head to Madison in April. Past topics discussed have included broadband internet access, school start dates, water quality, child care, and the Knowles-Nelson Stewardship Program. New to the process this year is Door County Economic Development Corporation Executive Director Michelle Lawrie and her counterpart in Kewaunee County, Ben Nelson. Lawrie says she will have to dust off her lobbying skills, but she is excited to bring the issues directly affecting the peninsula to Madison with other residents in tow.

The Door County/Kewaunee County Legislative Days steering committee could use your help even if you cannot head to Madison for the event on April 19th and 20th. You can click on this link to submit your ideas on issues for the delegation to present to legislators. 

 

You can also learn more about Door County/Kewaunee County Legislative Days by clicking this link,

State of the State leaves local rep encouraged

The upcoming state budget could have you seeing more money go toward concerns like mental health, education, and water clean-up. On Tuesday, Governor Tony Evers presented some of his ideas for the 2023-2035 budget as a part of his State of the State Address in Madison. With an expected $7.1 billion budget surplus, the Democratic governor outlined plans for redirecting more state aid to local governments and school districts and millions of dollars to address PFAS water contamination and mental health services. Rep. Joel Kitchens of Sturgeon Bay believes Governor Evers and Republicans agree on many areas the state needs to address. They just need to get to a point where they can negotiate and work together.

Kitchens was happy to see the Governor’s plan to dedicate $20 million to improving reading skills at Wisconsin schools. He had several bills vetoed by Governor Evers last session that would have addressed the issue by overhauling the state’s current reading-readiness assessment program. You can watch Governor Evers’ State of the State Address and the Republican response by Speaker Robin Vos below.

 

Republican Response

Kewaunee County farmers earn dairy leadership positions

You will recognize many of the faces on the boards for two of the biggest voices for dairy in the state. Lee Kinnard of Kinnard Farms in Casco was elected president of the Dairy Business Association for a two-year term. He previously served the DBA as its vice president in addition to his roles with Peninsula Pride Farms and Farmers for Sustainable Food. He was joined on the DBA Board by two other members of Peninsula Pride Farms: Nicolet National Bank’s Chris Schneider and Dvorachek Farm & Industry’s Jesse Dvorachek. 

 

Edge Dairy Farmer Cooperative, the country’s third largest dairy cooperative and a sister organization of the DBA, will still feature Jamie Witcpalek of Pagel’s Ponderosa Dairy in Kewaunee on its board. She continues to follow in the footsteps of her father, John Pagel, who served as the cooperative’s president from Edge’s start in 2010 until his passing in 2018. 

Three perfect scores highlight Packerland Math Meet, as Sturgeon Bay finishes on top

The Sturgeon Bay Math team came away with a narrow victory this week in the second Packerland Conference math meet of the year.  Three perfect scores of 40 points were registered, including senior Luke Nell of Sturgeon Bay and junior Ezra Linnan of Sevastopol.  Nell had a perfect score in last week’s competition as well.  The Clippers’ varsity team scored 243 points, while Sevastopol High School finished second with 228 points.  Sturgeon Bay math teacher and Coach Cliff Wind says the competition helps the students excel at math and prepare for the state competition.

 

Sturgeon Bay has won 21 straight conference championships and currently holds a 40 to 34 lead in the standings over Sevastopol and NEW Lutheran, who are tied in second place with 34 points.  You can find the complete results from this week’s Packerland Conference Math Meet below.  

 

 

Seniors

Name

school

score

 

1

Luke Nell

NEW

40

Perfect score

2

Christy Braun

STURGEON BAY

37

 

3

Espen Walker

STURGEON BAY

35

 

4

Brady Paul

NEW

35

 

5

Zittlow, Laura

SOUTHERN DOOR

32

 
         

Juniors

       

1

Ezra Linnan

SEVASTOPOL

40

Perfect Score

 

Jade Tomberlin

STURGEON BAY

   

3

Zittlow, James

SOUTHERN DOOR

37

 

4

Ben Stephens

STURGEON BAY

31

 

5

Hwang, Hannah

NEW

30

 
         

Sophomores

       

1

Luke Selle

STURGEON BAY

40

Perfect Score

2

Logan Filar

SEVASTOPOL

31

 

3

Chabrie, Maurits

KEWAUNEE

30

 

4

Tre Wienke

STURGEON BAY

28

 

5

Jack Konop

STURGEON BAY

26

 
         

Freshman

       

1

Grant Pieschek

SOUTHERN DOOR

21

 

2

Keira Wesley

STURGEON BAY

21

 

3

Levi Ullman

STURGEON BAY

14

 

4

Reid Kacmarynski

SEVASTOPOL

14

 

5

Aaron Tomasewski

SEVASTOPOL

13

 
         
         

Varsity Teams

       

1

STURGEON BAY

 

315

20

2

SEVASTOPOL

 

243

18

tie 3

NEW

 

241

15

 

SOUTHERN DOOR

 

241

15

5

KEWAUNEE

 

175

12

6

GIBRALTAR

 

152

10

7

ALGOMA

 

113

8

8

OCONTO

 

79

6

         

JV Teams

9 total teams

     

1

STURGEON BAY

#2

217

30

2

SEVASTOPOL

#2

113

28

3

STURGEON BAY

#3

110

26

4

KEWAUNEE

#2

60

24

         

Varsity Standings

 

League points after 3 meets

   

1

STURGEON BAY

60

   

2

SEVASTOPOL

52

   

3

NEW

49

   

4

SOUTHERN DOOR

41

   

5

KEWAUNEE

36

   

6

GIBRALTAR

32

   

7

ALGOMA

22

   

8

OCONTO

20

   
         
         

 

 

 

BUG Fire Department honors firefighters with awards

The recognition of several volunteer firefighters was on display earlier this month in Brussels. The Brussels-Union-Gardner (BUG) Fire Department celebrated its own by awarding Years of Service Recognition, Newly Retired, and the Annual Golden Axe Award.   Captain Bryan Jeanquart was presented with the annual Golden Axe Award, a distinction for going above and beyond the call of duty over the past year.   Fire Chief Curt Vandertie presented the awards to eight active firefighters who have served BUG Fire for at least five years, including Dan Vandertie and Galen Baudhuin for 35 years of service. Fire Chief Vanderie also recognized four new members of the department and the three newly retired firefighters, Dean Tassoul, Joel Daoust, and Mike Hanson. You can find the complete list of awards posted below.

 

5 years:

Dalton Everard

Eric Micolichek

10 years:

Mike Paye

20 years:

Jamie Kluth

25 years:

Bob Massart

Curt Vandertie

35 years:

Dan Vandertie

Galen Baudhuin

The following are Newly Retired:

Dean Tassoul: served for 25 years as a Firefighter at Station 1

Joel Daoust: served for 16 years in positions of Firefighter and Captain for Station 1

Mike Hanson: served for 10 years as a Firefighter at Station 2

The fire department also welcomed 4 new members who joined during the past 12 months. They included Danelle Micolichek, Andrew Martyn, Noah Slamka and Sarah Daul

Golden Axe:  Bryan Jeanquart

 

 

 

 

(photo courtesy of BUG Fire, Jeanquart receiving Golden Axe Award)

YMCA planning community breakfast for February

For the first time in three years, the Door County YMCA will be holding its Community Breakfast in person at Stone Harbor Resort and Conference Center next month.  The event has been held annually to celebrate past successes at the YMCA and raise awareness of the Membership For All program.  New Mission Advancement Executive Tyler Powell says this year’s Community Breakfast will also recap the “Heart of the Community” Capital Campaign used to renovate and expand the Sturgeon Bay Program Center.  He says the journey of the past two and one-half years will be shared about the over $10 million raised for the improvements.

 

 

Featuring a free breakfast and presentation, the event is open to anyone, YMCA members or not.  You can register for the Community Breakfast being held at 7:30 a.m. on Thursday, February 16, by clicking on the link.

Municipalities, organizations line up for Community Investment Fund

Thanks to Door County room tax dollars, your local municipality and favorite organizations could be in line for a significant grant. The Door County Community Foundation and Destination Door County announced the Community Investment Fund at the beginning of the year to provide assistance to improve the quality of all who live, work, and play on the peninsula. The two organizations hosted three different meetings in the weeks since to share details about the grants, which will range from a few thousand dollars to hundreds of thousands of dollars depending on the project. Door County Community Foundation President and CEO Bret Bicoy says they have met with several organizations and municipalities already about ideas they might have for the potential grants. He says the biggest hurdle is with Wisconsin State Statutes since the money being awarded comes from room tax dollars.

Bicoy encourages those seeking funds to meet with his staff to assess their idea before submitting an application. The grants will be awarded quarterly, with applications due at 4 p.m. on April 6th, July 6th, October 5th, and January 4th. The Door County Community Foundation will hold one more public meeting about the Community Investment Fund on February 9th at 10 a.m. 

 

You can listen to more about the Community Investment Fund by listening to our interview with Destination Door County’s Julie Gilbert by clicking this link.

Door County historian Evenson passes away

Without the work of George Evenson, much of what you know about Door County could have been lost in history. Evenson passed away on Sunday at the age of 93. A graduate of Sevastopol High School, local preservation was important to Evenson both historically and environmentally. He served three governors on the Wisconsin Coastal Management Program Board and was also a member of the Nature Conservancy Board. Evenson purchased St. Mary’s Church in Namur from the Diocese of Green Bay for a dollar, later helping the structure become the Belgian Heritage Center. Belgian Heritage Center Board Member Bill Chaudoir says Evenson was proud of the history of Door County. 

He served as the president of the Door County Historical Society, overseeing land and lighthouse preservation. He also lent a hand preserving other sites in the county, including Crossroads at Big Creek, The Farm, the Door County Granary, and the Hanson House. Laurel Hauser, the Executive Director of Crossroads at Big Creek and the President of the Sturgeon Bay Historical Society, says she learned a lot from Evenson.

Funeral services will be held this Friday at 2 p.m. at St. John Evangelical Lutheran Church in Valmy. You can read the full obituary here.

Kewaunee swears in Mueller as police chief

The City of Kewaunee officially ushered in a new era on Monday as Robin Mueller was sworn in as its new Chief of Police.  City officials honored retiring police chief James Kleiman, Jr. before officially pinning the badge on Mueller. Kleiman announced his retirement three months ago and tapped Mueller, then his assistant police chief, as his replacement. Mueller has been on the force in Kewaunee for over 20 years and will serve the community as the department’s first female police chief.

 

 

Grant extends Midsummer's performances for Alzheimer's patients

You will be able to see those who have Alzheimer’s and their caregivers continue to tap their toes and hum a few bars, thanks to Midsummer’s Music. The performing arts organization received a $10,000 Challenge America award from the National Endowment of the Arts for its B Double Sharp program with its Griffon String Quartet. Since the group’s inception, the Griffon String Quartet has performed in nursing homes and assisted living facilities to help connect those with Alzheimer’s with music. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, studies have shown that music may reduce agitation and improve behavioral issues that are common in the middle stages of the disease. Executive Director Allyson Fleck says it is a powerful moment to see a simple tune engage with an audience, no matter where the venue may be.

The grant received by Midsummer’s Music was one of 262 Challenge America awards, representing $2.62 million announced as a part of the NEA’s first round of giving this year.

Bay of Green Bay closing to commercial traffic

Starting Wednesday, you won’t see any commercial vessels navigating the southern Green Bay waters. The United States Coast Guard announced that the Captain of the Port Sector Lake Michigan would be closing all waters southwest of a line extending from Peshtigo Point to Sherwood Point in the bay of Green Bay at noon on Wednesday, January 25th. Commercial boaters will be off-limits, and the U.S. Coast Guard will cease breaking ice for commercial traffic. The bay is expected to be reopened in early spring, weather permitting.  

Door County Reads kicks off this week

The “Raft of Stars” will dock this week as the Door County Reads celebration begins. Taking place in Wisconsin, Andrew J. Graff’s “Raft of Stars” is about two boys running away from home after an incident and the four adults who try to track them down. Physical copies of the books have been available since late November at Door County Library branches, while digital versions can also be found on the Libby and Hoopla apps. The first scheduled events begin on  January 26th, when the Egg Harbor Library hosts the first of many book discussions throughout the county, and the Sturgeon Bay branch hosts a screening of Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom. 

 

Door County Library Director Dominic Frandup hopes the enthusiasm for the book translates to good attendance at their events.


The official kickoff is on January 29th, when the Kress Pavilion in Egg Harbor plays host to speaker Ron Lang.

 

You can click this link to find a complete schedule of this year’s Door County Reads celebration.

Organizations drumming up support for tower restoration

The Sturgeon Bay Historical Society and the Potawatomi Park Alliance want your help to send a message to Madison about the Potawatomi State Park Observation Tower. The two organizations expressed their frustrations shortly after the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the architectural firm GRAEF presented their plans for the observation tower located at the state park outside of Sturgeon Bay. The plans both involved ADA-compliant ramps in reaching the top of the structure depending on whether the current tower is restored or if a new one is built. Depending on the option, it could cost up to $7.5 million, something Dave Allen from the Potawatomi Park Alliance says could be feasible, but the tower may not be able to be saved in time if they wait for the fundraising dollars to come in to support the project. He suggests the tower itself be restored for $500,000 so something is better than nothing.

Governor Tony Evers said he would include the most popular option from the DNR’s survey of tower options into the 2023-2025 budget. The Sturgeon Bay Historical Society and the Potawatomi Park Alliance are collecting their own information about the topic while presenting the restoration of the observation tower with no ramp as a fifth option. Allen hopes they can get an audience with the governor to see where he stands on the issue and to make an in-person appeal to save the tower.

Time just as good as money for area non-profits

If you cannot afford to make a big donation to some of your favorite non-profits this year, if at all, there is still a way you can support them with your time. According to the philanthropy website GreaterGiving.com, 26 percent of nonprofits anticipated that small gifts would be critical for their revenue, with almost 40 percent saying they would be very important. United Way of Door County Executive Director Amy Kohnle says small donations were critical to their organization, raising their second-highest amount of over $776,000. She added that while dollars are nice, some organizations could use your time

Kohnle says things as simple as picking up food and stuffing envelopes are just some ways volunteers can support their efforts without costing them a dime. You can contact your favorite non-profit organizations to see what volunteer opportunities they may have for you.

Door County reports 74th COVID-related death as FDA shifts vaccine strategy

Door and Kewaunee counties remain at the low community level for COVID-19 despite some sad news delivered last week.

 

The Door County Public Health Department reported its 74th COVID-related death last Friday when they made their second update of the week. The update also noted that 25 of 39 tests administered came back positive for the virus. Door County did not report any additional hospitalizations.

 

In Kewaunee County, the Centers for Disease Control data shows 13 new cases were reported in a week through January 18th.

 

Nationally, NPR reports that the Food and Drug Administration would treat the COVID-19 vaccine similarly to what is done now with the flu by trying to predict the dominant strain heading into the fall. Proponents of the change say it is an appropriate strategy considering where the country is with the pandemic. At the same time, opponents question the desire for continued boosters, especially with how rapidly the virus can mutate and the current low demand for the shots. The topic will be discussed at their meeting on Thursday.

 

Door County COVID-19 Case Counts - January 20, 2023

Updated weekly on Monday when data available from the state. Case counts do NOT  include any at home testing results.  


Total Tests: 33,378 (+39)
Positive: 8,199 (+25)
Probable: 478
Negative: 24,701 (+26)
Hospitalizations: 275
Deaths: 74 (+1)


*Data regarding deaths may be delayed due to processing of medical reports at the state level. To see the timeline of when deaths occurred in Door County, follow the link below and use the filter to select Door.
https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/data.htm

Griffon String Quartet looking for new members

You could be the newest member of a popular quartet of musicians in Door County, as Midsummer’s Music is in the process of accepting applications to fill three positions of the Griffon String Quartet.  The resident string quartet is in need of Violin II, Viola, and Cello musicians.  Violinist and founding Griffon member Roy Meyer says the ensemble had relied on guest professional musicians to play the roles recently.  The Griffon Sting Quartet musicians have performed throughout northeast Wisconsin giving private and group lessons and educational outreach to school-age children.  Well known for the pop-up concerts in the area during the holidays, the quartet’s B Double Sharp program presents miniconcerts for seniors and disabled.  Applications are being accepted online at www.midsummermusic.com.  The deadline for applying for the Griffon String Quartet is March 15 with the season running from September through May every year.  Beginning in 2018, the quartet is a groundbreaking project to enrich the lives of children and adults throughout northeast Wisconsin through concerts, workshops, and music education outreach.  

Legislature poised to move on PFAS with surplus money

In the wake of another Wisconsin community being negatively impacted by PFAS contamination, leaders in the Wisconsin Legislature are aiming at the issue with the state’s budget surplus. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Department of Health Services (DHS), and Wisconsin Emergency Management (WEM) announced on Friday that they issued well-specific drinking water advisories in the Town of Stella in Oneida County. The advisories were needed after dozens of residences found high concentrations of PFAS in their water. The state regulators issued a similar PFAS-related warning to those who might eat fish caught in Lake Wausau and the Stevens Point Flowage. The human-made chemicals are also known as “forever chemicals” and have been linked to certain cancers, liver damage, and decreased fertility. State legislators are now looking at the state’s nearly $7 billion budget surplus as a starting point to get something done. Clean Water Action Council Executive Director Dean Hoegger says it is an important issue that needs money to address it.

Hoegger says PFAS and nitrate pollution were the two main topics he addressed when Governor Tony Evers recently held budget listening sessions in Green Bay.

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