News Archives for 2020-04

Riverview ATV Park opening delayed

The Kewaunee County Promotions and Recreation Department has delayed the opening of the ATV Park in Kewaunee.  Riverview ATV Park usually opens the first week in May, but due to the “Safer at Home Order’ the park will remain closed until May 26 or when the order is lifted.  According to the news release, wet conditions also contributed to the delayed opening.  Kelly Froelich of the Baylake ATV Club says the organization is continuing to groom and prepare the park trails for the season.   The Riverview ATV Park is located west of Kewaunee and allows for ATVs, UTVs, and dirt bikes.  Kewaunee County Parks Director Dave Myers could not be reached for comment.    

 

Hospital visits a balancing act

People’s concerns about COVID-19 are causing an unforeseen side effect for Door County Medical Center: empty rooms. The Kenosha News reports almost 40 percent of the state’s hospital beds are empty. Door County Medical Center Chief Medical Officer Dr. Jim Heise says people are avoiding the hospital and choosing to deal with their issues on their own in order to stay away from possible exposure. He says the hospital and its clinics have taken all the necessary precautions to make sure any patients with medical needs are safe to visit.

Door County Medical Center will start allowing elective procedures beginning next week on a reduced schedule to make sure people can avoid staying in the waiting room.

Baldwin looks to increase testing, improve turnaround

Wisconsin U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin wants to make sure those who want to know if they are COVID-19 carriers are able to get tested and find out quickly. Baldwin and many of her Democratic colleagues have called on the administration to utilize the Defense Production Act and make improvements to the supply chain to help get COVID-19 testing supplies into the hands of more people. She says some of the delays can be contributed to testing supplies not being standardized.

 

 

Baldwin says in this case, have a national testing strategy for COVID-19 would keep states from competing against each other for the necessary supplies and streamline the process. The Medical Supply Transparency and Delivery Act would also add reporting measures and oversight of the supply chain for the needed l equipment.  


Groups file briefs in order case

Statewide organizations with local ties are weighing in on the Safer at Home order case being brought forward to the state Supreme Court. Wednesday was the final day for groups on either side of the case to file their briefs to present why the Safer at Home order should last until May 26th or move up. Two of the groups that filed against the order were the Wisconsin Lakeshore Business Association and Hunter Nation. WLBA President and Kewaunee business owner Tom Kleiman says the Safer at Home order is unfairly affecting the lives of charter fishing guides and the communities their operations indirectly support.

The Wisconsin Institute of Law and Liberty also submitted a brief against the Safer at Home order on behalf of a number of businesses while some labor unions and health care advocacy groups filed in favor of the measure. The case is now in the hands of the Wisconsin Supreme Court.

 

 

Update: No new Kewaunee County coronavirus case Wednesday

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services updated its coronavirus tally Wednesday evening, showing another case in Kewaunee County, but that was a mistake. Public Health Officer Cindy Kinnard says that the database accidentally included an occurrence from New York State in Kewaunee’s official number. The count is 13 total cases with six active. One death was registered on April 13th. HIPAA laws prevent release of additional information.


Door County Public Health reports no changes. The numbers remain 12 total cases, two deaths, and seven recoveries. 

 

Emergency financial proposal goes to council

The Sturgeon Bay Common Council will consider the possibilities of spending cuts and other budget adjustments to cope with the impact of the COVID19 pandemic.  The city's Finance/Purchasing and Building Committee is forwarding an audit to the full council for consideration. That includes proposed budget amendments drawn up by City Finance Director/City Treasurer Val Clarizio and the Emergency Management team made up of city department heads over the past several weeks.  Council member Helen Bacon says the audit offers Sturgeon Bay spending options to follow as the pandemic runs its course.

 

 

The audit is expected to be taken up by the Sturgeon Bay Common Council when it meets on May 5th in the common council chambers on Michigan Street.  The chambers are expected to be open to the public only for observation and comment on agenda items.  All council meetings are broadcast via Sturgeon Bay Public Access Television online.


Door County Emergency Support Coalition tackles mental health

Sherry Mutchler is a former counselor and the point person for a new mental health initiative from the Door County Emergency Support Coalition. Mutchler leads a team of volunteers who are fielding calls from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM for those struggling with isolation during the “Safer at Home” order. She says that the Mental and Emotional Support Hotline, known as MESH, is for all ages, but she expects Door County seniors to need the most help.

 


So far, 570 volunteers have given a combined 4,000-plus hours to the Door County Emergency Support Coalition. Mutchler says that knowing her neighbors and friends are being helped is a reward in itself, and that is helping drive her to get MESH off the ground.

 

Local food pantry well supported

The food pantry at Feed and Clothe My People of Sturgeon Bay is humming for this time of year. Receiving Personnel Coordinator Ashley Madson says demand has roughly doubled over the past six weeks. Donations from the community have met the surge in need, says Madson.

 


The pantry is following social distance guidelines. Those in need place an order over the phone and pick it up from a cart outside the pantry without interacting with staff. Carts are wiped down before and after an order is completed. Madson says only a core group of volunteers is working for now, but she hopes the organization will be able to take on new help soon.

 

Coronavirus cases stay steady in Door, Kewaunee Counties

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services updated its coronavirus tally Wednesday evening, showing no additional cases in Door and Kewaunee Counties. The total number of confirmed cases stands at 13. The first and only death in the county was registered on April 13th. The county has recorded three new occurrences since Monday. HIPAA laws prevent release of additional information.


Door County Public Health reports no changes. The numbers remain 12 total cases, two deaths, and seven recoveries. 

 


Open Pride Festival update

The Pride Festival in Sturgeon Bay that promotes diversity through inclusion for all will not happen in 2020. Open Door Pride announced Monday that their fourth annual festival that was scheduled for Saturday, June 27, in Martin Park has been canceled.   Founder and organizer Cathy Grier says the decision was painful, but alternate plans are already being made to celebrate and support diversity in Door County.

 

 

The City of Sturgeon Bay's proclamation of Pride Month in June will still go on as scheduled. Grier adds that the annual Sandy Brown award given to an individual or organization that has shown dedication to the LGBTQ community will still be presented. You can learn more by visiting opendoorpride.org.  

School districts weigh graduation options

With the high school careers of its seniors coming to a close, area school districts are looking for ways to celebrate their achievements. Sturgeon Bay High School announced last week it would host a portion of their graduation virtually before a May 30th afternoon celebration including a boat procession from Madelyn Marina. On May 31st, Sevastopol is taking their ceremony to the town park for a drive-through ceremony. Principal Adam Baier says even though it may not be

Both graduation ceremonies will be carried on the radio stations of DoorCountyDailyNews.com. Kewaunee, Luxemburg-Casco, and Gibraltar have included graduation plans on their recent district board meeting agendas, but have not made any formal announcements.

 

 

Money, safety factors in fair cancellation

With the future of the event in mind, Kewaunee County Fair Secretary Isabella Haen says canceling was the best option. Hosting a carnival, four days of live music, and grandstand events like the planned monster truck show all carry big price tags and down payments in advance. Haen says health and social distancing concerns moving forward made it hard to encourage local businesses to sponsor the event and people to attend. She says those losses would have added up.

Haen says other options are being explored for potential exhibitors including virtual events or showing at other area county fairs. She thanks people for being positive at a time like this as they plan for the 2021 Kewaunee County Fair next July. 

 


Northern Sky Theater dusts off classics for virtual gala

Northern Sky Theater fans will experience a blast from the past next month as a part of their virtual Raise the Curtain gala. In honor of its 30th anniversary, the video airing on the night of the event will feature never-before-seen clips from past shows at Northern Sky Theater’s amphitheater at Peninsula State Park. Artistic Director Jeff Herbst says it is part of a larger pivot many performing arts organizations across the country have had to undertake after the COVID-19 pandemic wiped out ticket presales and parts of seasons.

The Raise the Curtain virtual event will take place on May 23rd. Northern Sky Theater canceled its outdoor summer season and postponed the start of its indoor season at its Gould Theater in Fish Creek earlier this month.

Board tells state to reopen

The Kewaunee County Board has sent its message to Governor Tony Evers that it is ready for the area and the state to reopen sooner rather than later. During its virtual meeting Tuesday night, the board approved the resolution 17-3 to ask the Governor to begin reopening the state on May 12th, which corresponds with the end of his emergency powers. Governor Evers previously extended the Safer at Home order from April 24th to May 26th as a way to further control the spread of the coronavirus. The county received close to 50 letters concerning the resolution with 28 letters in favor of the resolution and 20 against.

 

District 13 Supervisor Kim Kroll raised the motion to pass the resolution, calling to protect people’s health as well as their businesses.

In contrast, District 20 Supervisor Joanne Lazansky said the board needs to trust the opinion of medical experts.

Earlier in the meeting, Kewaunee County Public Health Director Cindy Kinnard updated the board on the area’s COVID-19 statistics, which includes 13 positive cases in Kewaunee County.

 

 

Supermarkets rank safest retail place by shoppers

Shoppers are feeling safer in supermarkets than other retail venues.  According to a national survey by the digital marketing firm First Insight last week, 54 percent of Americans feel “safe” or “very safe” from COVID-19 when shopping in grocery stores.  Alex Stodola, the manager at Stodola’s IGA in Luxemburg, credits his staff and procedures in making the store as safe as possible for his customers.

 

 

Stodola adds that the Kewaunee Artisan Center will be distributing free masks at Stodola’s IGA this Friday from noon until 3:00 pm.  Over 600 masks were handed out in Algoma last Friday.  Supermarkets ranked just ahead of drug stores, 50 percent, and big-box retailers, 45 percent, by respondents in the survey based on feeling safer during shopping.  You can find the complete survey results below.

 

 

Kewaunee County Fair canceled

Organizers of the Kewaunee County Fair announced Tuesday its decision to cancel its annual event in July. According to a release, the Kewaunee County Board made the decision based on the financial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic as well as uncertainty about the safety of social gatherings this summer. The board appreciates the efforts already made by the exhibitors, vendors, and sponsors in preparation of the event. The 2021 Kewaunee County Fair is scheduled for July 8th-11th.

 

RELEASE FROM KEWAUNEE COUNTY FAIR

2020 Kewaunee County Fair Canceled Due to COVID-19

 

LUXEMBURG, Wis. (April 28, 2020) – Kewaunee County Fair Board in Luxemburg, Wi., is saddened to announce the cancelation of the 2020 Kewaunee County Fair due to COVID-19.

 

“The safety for all who are involved in the community is our top priority,” said Isabella Haen, Secretary for the Kewaunee County Fair Board.

Everyone in the community has been impacted by COVID-19, especially local businesses who sponsor the fair. The Kewaunee County Fair Board also reviewed the financial impact and uncertainty for social gatherings in making a final decision. It is with the best interest of all who participate in the Kewaunee County Fair that we cancel this year’s fair.

 

“As a sponsor, I am grateful for the Kewaunee County Fair board for putting the safety of the community first.,” said Lisa Cochart, Casco Kidz Zone Owner., “We look forward to sponsoring next year and making the 2021 Kewaunee County Fair one to remember!” The Kewaunee County Fair appreciates the efforts that were already committed by so many exhibitors, vendors, service clubs, and volunteers for the 2020 fair. We share your sadness.

 

The Kewaunee County Fair Board will begin planning for the 2021 fair to make it one to remember. We look forward to seeing our community come back together for the Kewaunee County Fair from July 8-11th, 2021.

Kewaunee County confirms three more cases of COVID-19

Kewaunee County now has thirteen confirmed cases of COVID-19.   According to the Kewaunee County website, The Kewaunee County Public Health Department posted that four cases remain active while there have been six recoveries as of 2 pm Tuesday.  Kewaunee County Public Health Director Cindy Kinnard announced two additional cases during Tuesday's board meeting. The only COVID-related death was reported on April 13.  The first positive case of the novel coronavirus in Kewaunee County was on April 5th.  The Kewaunee County Public Health Department is working to identify and contact others who may have been in close contact with the people diagnosed with COVID-19.  No other details are available.  Names cannot be released due to HIPAA laws.  Wisconsin Department of Health Services reported Tuesday afternoon that the state had reached 300 deaths associated with COVID-19.  

 

 

Rep. Kitchens finds a lot to like in alternative plan to reopen Wisconsin

First District Representative Joel Kitchens hosted a Zoom meeting Tuesday afternoon, which had 100 attendees, including business owners, concerned citizens, and municipal employees from across the area. In his opening statements, Kitchens said conditions probably warrant a quicker reopening than that proposed by Governor Tony Evers’ Badger Bounce Back framework.

 


Kitchens said he has found a lot to like about the Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce, or WMC, model. That plan seeks to reopen most businesses by May 12th in a limited capacity. There would then be criteria in place to allow for restaurants and retail stores to reach normal traffic levels once thresholds are met for a prolonged time period. Kitchens wants to open negotiations with the governor.

 

Health officials credit social distancing impact

Door County health officials credit social distancing efforts for helping “flatten the curve” in the area as the state begins to slowly open back up. As of Monday afternoon, Kewaunee County has had 10 positive cases of COVID-19 with one person passing away and six people cleared. Door County announced two additional cases Monday, raising their total to 12 positive cases of COVID-19 with two people passing away and another seven recovering. Door County Medical Center Chief Medical Officer Dr. Jim Heise understands people’s anxiousness to get back to normal but said during Monday’s Facebook Live session that social distancing is helping keep the health system from being overrun.

He added strategies like herd immunity are more complex than exposing everybody and letting the virus run its course. Heise believes coronavirus is sticking around for the long term like influenza but hopes vaccines and time will help make its impact less severe.

 

 

Cooperative works to serve even better

Serving hundreds of people every weekday is no easy task, but the Door County Meals Cooperative continues to find ways to do it better. Monday marked the first day of a new distribution site and a new schedule for the organization since it began serving thousands of meals a week back in March. It now operates from 3 to 5 p.m. with many of the families in need picking up their meals before 4 p.m. It has also consolidated its meal sites in Fish Creek and Baileys Harbor to take place at the Gibraltar Fire Station to better serve residents in northern Door County. Chelsea Dahms from the Door County Meals Cooperative says they are ready for the long haul.

The Door County Meals Cooperative relies on monetary and business support to help it serve nearly 650 meals every day. A recent fish fry fundraiser collected over $5,000 in donations to support the organization’s mission of supporting the community’s less fortunate during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

 

Stickers needed at state parks

You will need to make sure you have your annual pass sticker on your car the next time you visit one of Door County’s five state parks beginning on Friday. Governor Tony Evers directed the Department of Natural Resources on Tuesday to reopen several state parks, forests, and recreational areas that were closed in early April. None of the local state parks were affected by the closure, but fees have been waived since March 24th since outdoor recreation was deemed an essential activity during the Governor’s Safer at Home order. Boat launches and trails will be open to those practicing social distancing, but restrooms and other buildings will remain closed. Sarah Hoye from the DNR says some state parks like Whitefish Dunes will have capacity limits.

If you plan on heading out this weekend, you will have to buy your annual park sticker ahead of time by calling the DNR. There is currently no information on day passes.  

Bridge prepares to close May 4th

After postponing work earlier this month due to a better than expected inspection, the Maple/Oregon Street Bridge will close next week for bridge repairs. The Wisconsin Department of Transportation will be making concrete deck repairs, laying a polymer overlay to protect their work, marking the pavement, and rebalancing the lift spans during the month-plus long project. DOT Project Manager Jeremy Ashauer says after being built 12 years ago, the bridge was due for some work.

The bridge will be closed from May 4th to May 15th to vehicles, pedestrians, and boats, The full project is expected to be finished no later than June 19th.

Developing self-help skills in coping with stress -- Mental Health Minute

Sturgeon Bay psychologist Dr. Dennis White says self-care begins with addressing one’s fears and needs before focusing on others, your family, and your job.  Dr. White shares advice from Dr. Charles Figley, a renowned expert in disaster-related mental health.  You should be satisfied with how you are coping with the stress associated with the novel coronavirus pandemic before turning your attention to others.  Dr. White shares a few of Figley’s self-care measures that are easy to practice during this time of uncertainty.

 

 

Dr. White adds that you can manage your stress by taking it day-by-day and by reaching out to others about your shared experiences.  You can listen to the entire Mental Health Minute by Dr. Dennis White with this story below.

 

 

  

 

Town of Gibraltar pushing for more reopening of economy

The Town Board of the Town of Gibraltar sent a letter to the Governor Evers' office last week with hopes that more will be done to reopen the state and the state's economy.  The letter was signed by all supervisors present at the meeting including the chair, Steve Sohns.  Asking for a balanced approach between science, health, and the economy, the letter emphasized the importance of tourism to Door County and the opening of businesses.  Sohns says the governor's recent actions of allowing nonessential businesses to reopen is a good start.

 

 

Sohns points out that companies and employees need to see hope, and the governor's newest order is a small step in that direction.  The Town of Gibraltar letter to Governor Evers closed by saying, "Responsibility needs to be given back to the people so they can start recovering from this ordeal and not lose hope they have left." You can find the complete letter in response to the Safer at Home order extension with the link below.

 

Town of Gibraltar letter to Governor Evers

 

  

 

Second COVID-19 death in Door County reported, two additional cases

The second death related to COVID-19 was announced by Door County Public Health officials on Monday afternoon.  Two additional positive cases also were announced bringing the total to 12 in Door County with seven recoveries. There have been 311 tests performed with a total of 275 negative results and 24 tests pending.  Public Health continues to investigate the two newest cases of the novel coronavirus in Door County and it has not yet been determined if there is evidence of community spread.  The first reported death in Door County was a man in his 70’s two weeks ago.  No other details will be disclosed due to privacy laws.

 

 

 

Gov. Evers issues new order for nonessential businesses

With 17 states in the country lifting restrictions and opening up more businesses on Monday, Governor Tony Evers signed a new Emergency Order that will allow nonessential businesses to do curbside drop-off of goods and animals.  Monday’s order will also allow companies to rent boats, kayaks, ATVs, and other recreational vehicles.  Automatic car washes and self-service car washes would be able to operate as well as long as there is no direct customer contact, and payment is made online or over-the-phone.  Last week Governor Evers extended the Safer at Home Order that will run through May 26.  It also allowed golf courses, construction businesses, and landscapers to do business with certain restrictions.  You can find the new order that will go in effect at 8 am this Wednesday below.

 

 

 

EMERGENCY ORDER #34 Interim Order to Turn the Dial WHEREAS, in December, 2019, a novel strain of the coronavirus was detected, now named COVID-19, and it has spread throughout the world, including every state in the United States; WHEREAS, on January 30, 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern; WHEREAS, on March 12, 2020, Governor Tony Evers declared a public health emergency and directed all agencies to support efforts to respond to and contain COVID-19 in Wisconsin; WHEREAS, on March 13, 2020, President Donald Trump proclaimed a National Emergency concerning COVID-19; WHEREAS, as of April 26, 2020, 2,810,325 people around the world have tested positive for COVID-19, including 928,619 in the United States and 5,911 in Wisconsin; WHEREAS, COVID-19 is present throughout Wisconsin, with people testing positive for COVID-19 in 66 of 72 counties as of April 26, 2020; WHEREAS, on March 24, 2020, I, Andrea Palm, Secretary-designee of the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, issued Emergency Order# 12, Safer at Home Order (hereinafter "Safer at Home Order"), requiring that everyone in Wisconsin stay at their home or place of residence except in limited circumstances; WHEREAS, on April 16, 2020, I modified and extended the Safer at Home Order to allow businesses new opportunities to get back to work and added new measures to keep employees and customers safer; WHEREAS, on April 20, 2020, I issued the Badger Bounce Back, outlining a plan to turn the dial down on the Safer at Home Order with progressively less-restrictive phases triggered when we, as a state, meet the gating criteria and make progress towards our core public health responsibilities; 1 West Wilson Street • Post Office Box 7850 • Madison, WI 53707-7850 • Telephone 608-266-9622 • www.dhs.wisconsin.gov Protecting and promoting the health and safety of the people of Wisconsin WHEREAS, the administration is constantly working to identify and promote creative ways to get Wisconsin back to business without risking the important progress we have made in flattening the curve and fighting the spread of COVID-19; WHEREAS, in collaboration with the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation, the public health experts at the Department of Health Services, and leaders and innovators in the business community, the Department has identified areas where Wisconsin can turn the dial now; and WHEREAS, in accordance with Section 3 of Emergency Order #31, Badger Bounce Back, this order reduces restrictions on certain businesses or sectors in a manner that is anticipated to have a minimal impact on the state's ability to make progress towards its core responsibilities and meet its gating criteria. NOW THEREFORE, I, Andrea Palm, Department of Health Services Secretary-designee, by the authority vested in me by the Laws of the State, including but not limited to Section 252.02(3), (4), and (6) of the Wisconsin Statutes, order the following: 1. Minimum Basic Operations. Minimum Basic Operations is defined by Section 14 of Emergency Order #28, Safer at Home Order, and shall additionally include the following: a. Curb-side drop-off. Minimum Basic Operations may include customer curb-side drop-off of goods or animals for the purpose of having those goods or animals serviced, repaired, or cared for by the business. Staff within the business or facility must be limited to one person in a room or confined space at a time, including a car or truck. Services must be paid for on-line or by phone. Drop-offs and pick-ups must be scheduled ahead of time to ensure compliance with Social Distancing Requirements as defined in section 16 of the Safer at Home Order. Customers are not permitted in the business or facility. The business may not require a signature by the customer. Suppliers to non-essential businesses and supply chains for non-essential businesses are non-essential and shall only operate under Minimum Basic Operations to provide goods or services to other non-essential businesses operating under this section. b. Outdoor recreational rentals. Minimum Basic Operations may include rental of recreational equipment including but not limited to boats, kayaks, canoes, paddle boats, golf carts, snowmobiles, and ATVs. Staff within the business or facility must be limited to one person in a room or confined space at a time, including a car 2 or truck. Rentals must be paid for on-line or by phone. The business must schedule pick-up and drop-off ahead of time to ensure compliance with Social Distancing Requirements as defined in section 16 of the Safer at Home Order. Customers must remain outside the business or facility. Rented equipment must be cleaned after each use. Suppliers to non-essential businesses and supply chains for non-essential businesses are non-essential and shall only operate under Minimum Basic Operations to provide goods or services to other non-essential businesses operating under this section. c. Car washes. Entirely automatic car washes and self-service car washes may open for service. High-touch surfaces must be cleaned between each use if possible, or as frequently as practicable. 2. Safer at Home and Badger Bounce Back remains in effect. Emergency Orders #28 and #31 remain in effect and are modified only by the specific additions described in this Order. 3. Duration. This Order shall become effective at 8:00 a.m. on Wednesday, April 29, 2020. This Order shall remain in effect for the duration of the Safer at Home Order. 4. Severability. If any provision of this Order or its application to any person or circumstance is held to be invalid, then the remainder of the Order, including the application of such part or provision to other persons or circumstances, shall not be affected and shall continue in full force and effect. To this end, the provisions of this Order are severable. 5. Supremacy. This Order supersedes any local order that is in conflict with this order. Andrea Palm Secretary-designee Department of Health Services State of Wisconsin.

 

Parish follows faith

For at least a few miles on Sunday, things resembled a sense of normal for parishioners of St. Francis and St. Mary Parish in Brussels. The parish’s pastor, Father Edward Looney led a Eucharistic procession from the church to Brussels Hill, where he offered a blessing on not just the consecrated host his monstrance was holding, but for the surrounding communities as a whole. Looney has been able to reach members and other area Catholics via Facebook and 104.1 WRLU since public masses were suspended in March. He says Sunday’s procession was a positive sign.

Looney says he was pleasantly surprised when parishioners walked with him rather than watch the procession from their cars. He hopes to host a Eucharistic procession for his other parish, St. Peter and St. Hubert’s in the towns of Lincoln and Rosiere this Sunday.

 

Pictures provided by Fr. Looney

 

 

Manufacturers doing their part to protect workers

Door County Economic Development Corporation Executive Director Steve Jenkins is happy with the proactive measures area manufacturers have taken to keep their employees safe. Other large scale businesses in the country including northeast Wisconsin have had to slow down or even halt their operations due to COVID-19 outbreaks in their facilities. While their operations have had to be flexible due to their customers, many manufacturers have been able to keep their employees busy and safe thanks to ramped up disinfection procedures and social distancing practices. Jenkins say there are a few reasons why manufacturers are going above and beyond the normal call.

Jenkins salutes Door County’s manufacturers for being able to weather the pandemic while dedicating themselves to making sure their employees are taken care of during this time.

Law enforcement team up on garbage

Members of Kewaunee County law enforcement took time last week to fight more than just crime on area roadways. Spearheaded by Wisconsin State Trooper Logan Christel, members of the Wisconsin State Patrol, Kewaunee County Sheriff’s Department, and local police departments cleaned up a section of State Highway 42. Kewaunee County Sheriff Matt Joski supplied much of the equipment needed to pick up trash and other debris from the two-mile stretch since he volunteers cleaning up two other sections with his family and his local Scouts BSA troop. He saluted Christel for his dedication to the community he serves.

Joski says there are plenty of roadway sections available for families and organizations to adopt to leave a positive legacy on the environment and in the community.

County Board hopes to encourage state to reopen

The Kewaunee County Board could formally ask the state to begin the reopening process after its newest members are seated on Tuesday. The board will elect a new chairperson and vice-chairperson and address some of its other organizational details before taking up the resolution. The measure asks Governor Tony Evers to begin reopening the state on May 12th rather than letting his May 26th Safer at Home order expire. May 12th corresponds with the first day after Governor Evers’ emergency powers end. Kewaunee County Public Health Director Cindy Kinnard will give a COVID-19 update to the board prior to the vote. Members of the public will be able to watch Tuesday’s meeting stream on YouTube beginning at  4 p.m. Kewaunee County Administrator Scott Feldt and Corporation Counsel Jeff Wisnicky could not be reached at the original time of this posting. 

Second round of Second Street Bridge construction starting

Construction begins Monday on the Second Street Bridge in Algoma, but it won’t be on the same scale as 2019. All work should be finished by mid-May. The job is mostly touching up landscaping and other smaller, aesthetic items that couldn’t be completed last year, says Kewaunee County Highway Department Head Todd Every.

 


The bridge work is the only major project for Kewaunee County until paving begins in the summertime. Every says the bridge, and County Highway S will be closed during the construction.

 

Adopt a Soldier group halts accepting donations

Adopt a Solider of Door County is not accepting donations for the care packages it sends to active duty armed forces members overseas.  That includes gift items for the packages and cash to fund operations.  Organizer and founder Nancy Hutchinson says in light of the “Safer at Home” order such actions are the right thing to do.  Hutchinson also says Adopt a Soldier will be giving back to the community as a way of saying thank-you.

 

 

Hutchinson says once it is decided how to distribute its stocks of care package items, veterans in need around Door and Kewaunee counties will get priority for some of those materials.

Door County Library holds virtual book clubs

Door County Library branches are closed.  Book clubs, however, will still be meeting online.  The library will be holding social distancing book clubs every Friday afternoon with help from Zoom video conferencing.  Morgan Mann, Community Relations Library Assistant, says everything about the virtual book clubs will be the same as the in-person get-togethers.  They'll just be held in the comfort of your home or break room.

 

 

 

The social distancing book clubs can be attended by logging onto the Door County Library's Facebook page.

Domestic violence kept in check locally

The Violence Intervention Project has remained open through the coronavirus crisis but has not seen the spike in domestic cases that others are beginning to observe nationwide. Volunteer Jill says she hopes the dry spell reflects actual conditions within Kewaunee County, but it could be due to other factors.

 


Contact information for the Violence Intervention Project can be found here.

 

Recovery policy can help area restaurants

The President of the Wisconsin Restaurant Association, Kristine Hillmer, thinks the correct policy choices from state officials once the “Safer at Home” order is lifted could prove beneficial to area restaurants. Hillmer says Door County can weather the storm better than others under the right circumstances.

 


Hillmer says businesses that can scale their operations towards delivery and carryout are seeing business boom. Upscale dining has been less successful with eating in prohibited.

 

Fighting the "quarantine 15"

With many area businesses closed, routines are different, and that means odd snack cravings, messed up sleep schedules, and some weight gain. The Door County YMCA has virtual fitness programs produced at the national and local levels to help combat the “quarantine 15,” says Annual Campaign Director Alyssa Dantoin.
 
 

 

 
Dantoin says there are currently around five office staff members who are working full-time at the Sturgeon Bay location until the facility is allowed to reopen, and their schedule remains busy.

Area families adjust to economic impact

Money Management Counselors says it is beginning to see a spike in new clients, roughly a month after layoffs started in Door County. Director Leslie Boden says she expected there to be a lag period before people had to confront a new reality.

 


Money Management Counselors are helping clients by teleconference. There is a 24-hour drop box at the organization’s Sturgeon Bay location on 12th Avenue, near the high school for clients to drop off confidential documents. Those interested in learning more about what services the non-profit agency provides can pick up information outside the office as well.

 

Kewaunee County confirms tenth case of COVID-19

The Kewaunee County Public Health Department announced the tenth confirmed case of COVID-19 on Saturday.  According to the Kewaunee County website, five cases remain active while four cases have been cleared.  The only COVID-related death was reported on April 13.  The first positive case of the novel coronavirus in Kewaunee County was on April 5th.  The Kewaunee County Public Health Department is working to identify and contact others who may have been in close contact with the people diagnosed with COVID-19.  Door and Kewaunee County now both have ten confirmed cases.  No names can be released due to HIPAA laws.   

 

Taking care of emotional needs of farmers

While they may not be able to manage supply chain disruptions or commodity prices, Kewaunee County UW Extension Human Development and Relationships Educator Renee Koenig believes farmers can keep tabs of their stress. Over 40 million American adults have an anxiety disorder and the added unknown of COVID-19 has only added to the long list of concerns of farmers including low prices, high debt load, and wet weather. Koenig says taking care of yourself, connecting to others, tapping into resources, knowing the warning signs of mental illness are all ways to fight back.

The UW-Madison Division of Extension has developed the Resilient Farms and Families project to give farmers the resources needed to help address their stress. You can learn more about the website and read more about managing on-farm stress below.

 

 

Supporting Farmers During Challenging Times: Managing Stress

By Renee Koenig, Associate Professor and Extension Educator for the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Division of Extension in Kewaunee County.

 

Farmers have always had to deal with a lot of uncertainty, even before the COVID-19 pandemic.  Unpredictable weather, changes in the economy, accidents, health issues and other unplanned events make farming a stressful occupation.      

 

Stress is a normal part of life and can even be helpful when we need to meet a deadline, for example.  If stress happens too often or lasts too long, it can have bad effects.  It can be linked to headaches, upset stomach, back pain, and trouble sleeping.  It can weaken your immune system, making it harder to fight off disease. Medical research tells us that unrelieved stress is a known risk factor in many of the leading causes of premature death among adults such as heart disease, hypertension, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. Chronic stress is also a potential risk factor for depression, addiction, and suicide.

 

Too much stress also affects our thinking and decision-making.  To learn more about some amazing studies of stress and its impact on the brain, watch the short videos on the University Extension’s Farm Stress Management website https://fyi.extension.wisc.edu/farmstress/.

 

The good news is there are many ways to reverse the effects of stress.

 

What can we do to support farmers who might be caught in a cycle of stress?

 

Take Care of Yourself

 

You probably heard of phrases like, “You can’t pour from an empty cup” or “when on a plane, put your own oxygen mask on first before helping others.” A visual of this might be a fuel gauge on empty. When we’re running on empty, and we don’t take the time to “fill up” on healthy practices, then we are going to struggle to be helpful to those around us.

 

You can take care of yourself by focusing on your body, mind and spirit.  To take care of your body you need to eat well, drink plenty of water, sleep enough, avoid tobacco and drugs, and limit alcohol.  To take care of your mind use positive self-talk, mindfulness, meditation and prayer, deal with conflict appropriately, write in a journal, enjoy music, find fun and humor.  Taking care of your spirit means living your life in line with your values and beliefs, and finding sources of comfort and hope.  Some people find it helpful to read a favorite Bible passage or quote. 

 

Connect to Others 

 

We know we have to be physically distant right now, but it is so important to pick up the phone, call, text or check in with others. One of the key factors for how well we cope with stress is how connected we feel to those around us.  Having many strong relationships equals healthier coping with stress.  The stronger our resilience is, the better we cope with stress. Social isolation weakens resilience, while social connection strengthens it.
 

When you check in with a farmer you know, offer them hope.  Sometimes stress stems from grief.  Farmers might be experiencing grief over a loss of what they wanted, and a feeling of loss of how successful their business could have been. One way to offer them hope is to talk about the things they can control.  You can mention the Serenity Prayer, “grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change” or another popular saying is, “Just Do the Next Right Thing.”  You might ask them, “What does your head say is the next right thing to do?” and “What does your heart say is the next right thing to do?”  They have the control to decide to pick up the shovel and move the pile, or go make a sandwich because they haven’t eaten for over 11 hours.  They have the control to start a new budget spreadsheet or go to bed and get enough sleep. They have the control to start fixing the truck or go hug their spouse first.

 

When you are having these conversations, it is possible that they will share with you some hard things and you will want to be prepared. There are many resources available to you.

 

Tap Into Resources

 

Your UW-Extension county educator is a resource.  You might also refer them to a therapist, doctor or clergy.  The Department of Ag Trade Consumer Protection is a resource and so is Harvest of Hope.  The Access.wisconsin.gov is for Wisconsin’s benefits and 2-1-1 is a helpful directory of resources.  There are many new disaster relief resources that you can tap into at https://fyi.extension.wisc.edu/covid19/.  You don’t have to know all the solutions, but you can be a connector.

 

Learn the Warning Signs of Mental Illness and Ways to Respond

 

You can learn QPR Suicide Prevention, the QPR stands for Question, Persuade, Refer and it is like CPR but for helping someone in a crisis of suicide. It is a short training for any adult to learn.  Mental Health First Aid is another course available from UW-Extension.  Learn a crisis hotline number, your county crisis number, or a national number or save the number in your phone contacts. 

 

It is important to learn about mental illness because it is more common than many people realize.  Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health concern in the United States. Over 40 million adults in the U.S. have an anxiety disorder.  An estimated 17.3 million adults in the U.S. had at least one major depressive episode.  Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death overall in the U.S.

 

Anyone can be the one to help.  You don’t have to be a mental health professional.  You can make a commitment to end the stigma of mental health and suicide.

For more information, contact Renee Koenig at renee.koenig@wisc.edu or visit the University Extension’s Resilient Farms & Families website at https://fyi.extension.wisc.edu/farmstress/.

 

Resources:

 

Extension’s Farm Stress Website  https://fyi.extension.wisc.edu/farmstress/

 

Extension Responds to COVID-19 https://fyi.extension.wisc.edu/covid19/

 

Wisconsin Farm Center  1-800-942-2474 or datcp.wi.gov

 

Crisis Text Line  Text 741741

 

Suicide Prevention Lifeline  1-800-273-TALK(8255)

Suicidepreventionlifeline.org

En Espanol 1-888-628-9454

 

 

Dark Sky Week celebrated in isolation

Door County features an internationally recognized dark sky preserve at Newport State Park and the Door Peninsula Astronomical Society, but the past week saw little celebration. International Dark Sky Week was observed in isolation, highlighted by the Lyrid meteor shower, which peaked on Tuesday. The Lyrids are not as well-known as August’s Perseid event and not quite as prolific. A person can expect to see around 18 meteors per hour at the height of activity. They don’t produce tails across the sky either due to their trajectory, says Dave Lenius.

 


The International Dark Sky Society has been live-streaming virtual lectures since Sunday. They are available on-demand at the organization’s Youtube page.

 

Sturgeon Bay paving projects began this week

Road paving projects have started in the City of Sturgeon Bay. City Engineer Chad Shefchik says there are two phases to the work.

 


Shefchik hopes that most jobs can be done in the next month when the “Safer at Home” order is still in effect, as that would reduce the inconvenience of the construction as much as possible. A list of all locations where paving is scheduled can be found below. Work is expected to be complete by mid-July.

 

**********************

 

The following roadways have all of their concrete curbing and / or sidewalks sections scheduled to be replaced cut.  They will be removed in the near future with concrete replacements to follow shortly:

-S Baraboo Ave from W Maple Street to W Oak Street
-Circle Ridge Place from S Ridgeway Drive to Quarter Deck Lane
-Louisiana Street from N 4th Ave to N 5th Ave
-Utah Street from S 15th Ave to S 18th Ave
 

The following roadways have been marked out for concrete curbing and / or sidewalk replacements.  They will be cut in the near future with concrete removals to follow shortly:

-S 15th Ave from Memorial Drive to Texas Street
-Memorial Drive from Utopia Circle East to Utopia Circle West
-Jefferson Place from N 18th Ave to Kentucky Place
-Bluebird Street from N 12th Place to N 14th Ave
-S Ridgeway Ave from E Binnacle Place to E Compass Street
-E Binnacle Place from S Ridgeway Drive to S Ridgeway Ave
-S Ridgeway Drive from Tacoma Beach Road to the South Termination

 

Midsummer's Music shares anniversary with a legend

This year marks the 30th anniversary of Midsummer’s Music. Executive Director Allyson Fleck says her group is flexible and is ready to adapt as needed to the coronavirus outbreak. That could mean online concerts at the beginning of the season. Midsummer’s Music shares a milestone with a legend as 2020 is the 250th birthday of Ludwig van Beethoven. The group plans to highlight some of his lesser-known work, says Fleck.

 


Additional highlights from the 2020 schedule can be found below.

 

***************************

 

 

Midsummer's Music, Wisconsin's oldest summer chamber music series is celebrating its 30th summer of presenting exceptional chamber music in the hidden vacation paradise of Door County, Wisconsin. Concerts hailed as "exciting, pulse-pounding and riveting," are given in a variety of cultural, historical and scenic locations, including art galleries, museums, historic sites and private homes with several venues offering panoramic views of Lake Michigan and the waters of Green Bay. The 2020 season, running June 12 through September 7, features over 40 concerts performed by world class musicians, drawing on the extraordinary talent of musicians from the Chicago Symphony, Chicago's Lyric Opera, Milwaukee Symphony, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, Indianapolis Symphony, Aspen Music Festival, China National Symphony, the Ravinia Festival and the world renowned Pro Arte Quartet, among others. The concerts feature standard repertoire as well as gems from lesser-known composers and attract a growing dedicated following every year, plus thousands more via Wisconsin Public Radio broadcasts and on Live from Chicago's WFMT Radio. Coinciding with the 30th anniversary, Midsummer's will release their 5th recording dedicated to the meritorious works of lesser known composers.

 

Providing unique, diverse and scenic musical experiences, the theme for the 30th anniversary season is a celebration of favorite repertoire from the series' first 30 years, a special focus on Beethoven's 250th birthday, and a continuing tradition of championing the works of female composers which will spotlight Louise Farrenc and Libby Larsen this year. Highlights include a special 30th anniversary concert event on July 11, 2020 at picturesque Bjorklunden in Baileys Harbor, and a special concert on Washington Island, where guests will travel by charter ferry to reach the charming destination. Repertoire includes a series of concerts dedicated to the works of Beethoven including the Septet in E-flat Major, Op. 20, an arrangement for piano and string quintet of his Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major, Op. 58, the Serenade in D Major, Op. 25 for flute, violin, and viola, Sextet in E-flat Major, Op. 81b for two horns and string quartet and the Kreutzer Sonata in A Major arranged for string quintet. The season will include a world premiere by Midsummer's award-winning Composer-in-Residence Jacob Beranek, and post-season in May, Midsummer's year round Ensemble in Residence, The Griffon String Quartet will also perform. Midsummer's Music continues its partnerships with local arts organizations including the Woodwalk Gallery and Write On, Door County featuring collaborations with visual artists and noted area poets who create original pieces based on inspiration from the music being performed. Previously Midsummer's Music showcased a series of water-themed concerts in collaboration with the Celebrate Water Door County initiative bringing awareness to water supply protection.

 

No start date yet for Potawatomi pier construction

Potawatomi State Park Superintendent Erin Brown-Stender says she is excited for the new pier project, expected to be wrapped up this fall. Brown-Stender says the construction is made possible through a generous donation from the Friends of Potawatomi organization in addition to state and federal funding. While Brown-Stender says the timeframe for completion remains about six months away, no start date has been finalized.

 


Potawatomi remains open to the public. The pier replaces a handicap accessible dock, which was damaged during a storm in 2014.

 

Destination Door County busy waiting for tourism to return

The extension of Governor Tony Evers’ “Safer at Home Order” will delay the tourism season in Door County. Still, the ambassadors to Door County are staying busy planning for the reopening, whenever it may come.  Destination Door County is repeating the message that they want visitors to the area when it is safe.  Jack Moneypenny told DoorCountyDailyNews.com last week that his staff is doing a great job despite the challenges faced.

 

 

Destination Door County is still filling Visitor Guide orders and sending out gift certificates while handling forwarded phone calls by staff members working from home.  Moneypenny reported Friday that Destination Door County has already received 8,000 requests for the visitor guide cherry contest in just 24 hours by people planning future trips to the area. 

Estate plans help you get ready for emergencies

Not having a will in place before your death can leave uncertainty to your estate, but especially during the COVID-19 crisis, families should have access to your paperwork for executive powers. Attorney Bob Ross of Ross Estate Planning in Sturgeon Bay says there are three critical things you should do today to be prepared in case of an emergency.  One is to get organized.  Number two is make sure that your general durable power of attorney is current.  And number three, update your health care directives.

 

 

Ross says having passwords updated and chronicled is critical as well. He says the most important document to have in your estate plan is a good financial power of attorney.  You can find more details on being ready should an emergency arise in your family below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

THREE CRITICAL STEPS YOU NEED TO TAKE 

TODAY

By Attorney Bob Ross and Attorney Jane Seusy, Ross Estate Planning

We are living in very challenging times. The Covid-19 has attacked the whole world with a vengeance, putting life in jeopardy. The longest running bull market has just lost one-third of its value. What a challenge!

Are you ready if an emergency arises in your family?

If you do not spend the time and money now, your family will spend much more when you are gone or incapacitated. Set aside a specific time right now. Allow me to suggest three (3) critical steps you need to take right now, presented in four installments – three critical things you need to do now and a bonus tip!

FIRST IT IS CRITICAL THAT YOU GET ORGANIZED

Organize your information and your advisors. List your personal information, personal advisors, accounts, investments, and passwords.

Don't leave your family scrambling. And don't assume that they will figure it out. Make sure your loved ones know exactly where this information is and how to access it. Write out any additional instructions on how to reach these accounts and investments.

Do those important to you know where your financial accounts are located, how to log onto your accounts online or in which bank branch your safety deposit box is located? All sorts of personal information might be very difficult to find in the event of your incapacity or death. Unless your child is Sherlock Holmes, it’s a good idea to let them all know where these important documents and items can be found.  Don’t assume that your spouse knows what you know or is comfortable reaching out to your advisors.  Review the lists of accounts and important people with your loved ones so they can ask questions now.


How do you get organized?

Consolidate Your Accounts. If you hold individual stocks, create a broker account or submit them to your financial advisor, rather than keeping the actual stock certificates yourself.  Reduce the number of 1099’s you receive at tax time by merging accounts or reducing the number of companies or brokers who manage your investments.  List all of your digital and online accounts: Email, FaceBook, Google, Amazon, Bitcoin, monthly memberships. List your user names and which Email account they are linked to.  Document payments that are made automatically or bills that only come to you in paperless format.  Your loved ones, your attorney, your advisors all will need this information if you are no longer able to communicate it.   And since so much is now online you need to: PASS YOUR PASSWORDS. I suggest that you have a password manager like LAST PASS™ or other secure APP.  The greatest gift you can leave your family is an organized collection of names, accounts, locations and access information.  If you read this and are overwhelmed at the prospect of organizing all of this, imagine how your loved ones will feel if they have to do it when you are no longer available!

 

Find Your Estate Plan:  If you have had Powers of Attorney for health and/or finances, a Will or a Trust prepared, do you know where it is?  Do your loved ones know where it is and who to contact if they have questions about it?  When was the last time you reviewed it?  Is it current and does it have the correct people named for the various roles it creates?  As with your financial information and online access information, if you cannot find copies of these things, it is unlikely your loved ones will be able to.  If you have not prepared any of these documents, contact an experienced estate planning attorney and begin the discussion!  If you do have current documents, discuss them with your family.

 

Family Meeting:   After you organize, or even AS you organize, have a family meeting. Talk about who your important advisors are, introduce them to your family.  Review the types of accounts you hold and how you get your statements or access your funds.  Discuss your strategies so they understand how you have planned to cover costs and which funds are the first you intend to use.

 

We are in the midst of a very unusual state of flux.  Perhaps you have more time on your hands and it is a perfect time to get organized.  Perhaps you have less time and need to reach out to family or advisors for help getting started.  But we are also living through a time when sudden illness is a real threat.  It is not morbid to take steps to get organized, it is preparedness.  And it is peace of mind for both you and your loved ones.

Organization is the first step we always preach to clients.  As part of that process, it makes sense to review your estate plan – your powers of attorney for financial matters, your health care directives, your will or trust.  This review leads us to your second critical step:

SECOND, IT IS CRTICAL THAT YOUR GENERAL DURABLE POWER OF ATTORNEY BE CURRENT

Your General Durable Power of Attorney (sometimes referred to as a “financial power of attorney) is the most important document in your plan. If it is more than three years old, it likely does not address new issues, such as virtual currency or on-line access to accounts and information. 

If you become incapacitated and don’t have a valid durable power of attorney that names someone who can act for you in matters that do not concern health care decisions (ie, write checks, pays bills and manage your financial and legal affairs, gain access to your on-line accounts) OR, if no one can find the Power of Attorney you once signed, the alternative is a court-ordered guardianship. Not only is court-ordered guardianship difficult on your loved ones, it is also expensive and time-consuming. If you think one lawyer is expensive wait until you need two, and a doctor.

I Have the State Authorized Power of Attorney. Believe it or not, there are vast differences between differently-drafted Powers of Attorney.  The statutory form and other easily downloadable versions are very general, and at the same time, very restrictive.  Do you understand what your Power of Attorney provides?  Just as importantly, do you understand what it prohibits?  And most importantly, do you understand when it works?  

If your Power of Attorney is not prepared by an experienced estate planning attorney, it is very possible it does not empower your agent with some very important abilities.  Does it address access to digital data?  Does it allow for your agent to sign and file your tax return?  Does it allow your agent to do advanced estate planning for you?   If your Power of Attorney is not prepared by an experienced Elder Law Attorney it likely will be useless to help with your long term care needs, such as qualifying you for assistance.

SOMETIMES a limited power of attorney is important.  For instance, if you do not have a trusted family member, friend or professional with whom you are comfortable granting such power.  But if you are not knowledgeable as to what you are and are not enabling your agent to do, it is difficult to address safeguards and alternatives that are also available.  If no experienced advisor has identified potential gaps in your power of attorney, you will not know what other provisions you should have included – until it is too late.

Who Should I Appoint?   Be careful as this document grants very significant power and you want to choose those folks that you trust, and are savvy in handling financial affairs.  Remember that you can appoint more than one person to be empowered at the same time, requiring either that they act jointly or permitting any one to act independently.  If your spouse is not experienced in financial affairs, consider appointing a Co-Agent to act with him or her so that both can stay informed but your spouse is not overwhelmed.  If you have several children you trust, provided they can communicate well there is no restriction on appointing more than one of them to act.  Do not limit yourself to family members.  If you fear that these sorts of matters may cause division amongst your loved ones, consider appointing a professional Agent, either from your bank or financial institution or from a local company that provides trained individuals to act as your Agent.   Additionally, modern technology is such that distance is not as much of a consideration in choosing your Agent.  A trusted family member or friend who does not live nearby may still be perfectly able to act for you without traveling to your location.

Don’t forget to tell your Agent that you are entrusting them with this position!  “Surprise, you’re my Power of Attorney” is not the way your Agent should find out they are included in your plans.  Discuss your goals, holdings, plans and desires with the person or persons you are appointing.  Be sure they know where to find a copy of the Power of Attorney, along with the lists of advisors and accounts you prepared when you GOT ORGANIZED.   You don’t have to share actual account values before you are comfortable doing so, but you must be sure they know where to get that information when they need it.

Without a current, well prepared General Durable Power of Attorney, you handicap your loved ones when you are incapacitated.  Children and spouses are not AUTOMATICALLY granted access to accounts or information simply by their status.  You MUST empower them.  In the absence of that power, bills may go unpaid, penalties may accrue, and chances to protect your estate from being liquidated to pay for care may be lost or delayed.   

While a General Durable Power of Attorney permits an Agent to act for you in financial and legal affairs, Health Care Directives list who can be included in disclosure of medical information, who can actually make medical decisions with and for you, and what specific medical decisions you desire in certain circumstances.  Sometimes all of these elements are included in a Health Care Power of Attorney, sometimes they are separated into a HIPAA Consent (who has access), a Health Care Power of Attorney (who can make decisions), and a Living Will (specific directions for specific situations).  As you GET ORGANIZED, and UPDATE YOUR GENERAL DURABLE POWER OF ATTORNEY, the third critical action you should take is to UPDATE YOUR HEALTH CARE DIRECTIVES.   

THIRD, IT IS CRTICAL THAT YOU UPDATE YOUR HEALTH CARE DIRECTIVES.

Why is it so important that your health care directives be documented and current?  First, it allows you to maintain control of your medical decisions.  As I said in my last article about General Durable Powers of Attorney, your spouse and your children are not AUTOMATICALLY empowered to make health care decisions for you if you are unable to do so yourself.  

Unless you wish to become the next Terri Schiavo, you should strongly consider signing a new HIPAA consent, Health Care Power of Attorney and Living Will. You may remember the St. Petersburg, Florida woman who was on life support for 15 years. Schaivo’s court case between her husband (who insisted that she would not have wanted to be kept alive artificially) and her parents (who argued she wasn’t in a persistent vegetative state and should continue to be sustained by artificial means) – resulted in a political and media circus involving the United States Congress and the Supreme Court. I don’t know about you, but one of my lifetime goals does not include having my private health care matters being debated by our esteemed congressmen and senators.  Nor do I want to subject my loved ones to the agonizing decisions about my continued survival without some guidance from me.

Who Should I Appoint?  I don’t know if your kids are like mine. They were all raised under the same roof…how did they all turn out so different?  Not everyone is willing or able to make tough medical decisions.  It is not as important that the person you appoint be knowledgeable about medical issues as it is that they be (1) available and (2) willing to put your wishes and beliefs above their own.  

“Available” is not always geographically limited.  With Skype and Facetime and other mobile access tools, a trusted loved one can be included in discussing your health care decisions with doctors and nurses without being physically at your side.  

“Willing to put your wishes and beliefs above their own” assumes that you have expressed your wishes and beliefs to the person you are asking to act for you.  It also involves trusting them to advocate for you in place of you to insist that your choices are followed and your treatments follow your desired course.  It is also vital that you share your wishes and beliefs with your doctors – the professionals who will be helping and guiding your chosen agent and loved ones.

We also strongly suggest that you document your desires.  Many online tools are available to walk you through the types of decisions you may once ask your health care agent to make so that you can educate them as to your preferences.  Documentation not only assists your agent in making decisions but also provides them with proof that you considered your options and expressed your opinions while you were still able to do so.

Organ donation is an example of a very personal choice that differs for many people.  It is also an example of a decision that must be made quickly by your health care agent when the time comes.  At a time when emotions are running high and shock may affect your loved ones’ ability to process information, your documented preferences can make a traumatic situation easier to handle.  

Unlike General Durable Powers of Attorney that are used to manage non-medical areas of your life, Health Care Powers of Attorney must name only one person at a time as the Agent authorized to make your decisions.  But you can name multiple alternates in one or more agents is unable or unwilling to act.  You cannot name your health care provider.  As with professional trustees and financial agents, there are professional health care agents available to name if you have no close family or friends.

Where Should I Store My Health Care Directives?  We believe that health care directives should be given out like candy!  Make sure your named agents each have a copy.  Be sure your doctor and local hospital of choice have a copy.  Keep a copy in the glove compartment of your car.  Pack a copy in your suitcase when you travel.  Subscribe to a service such as LegalVault which will store your health care directives for you and provide you with a card to carry which alerts any medical provider in the world access to the actual documents in emergency situations.

Never, ever store your health care directives in your safety deposit box. Emergencies never seem to happen during banking hours. What would you do now with all bank lobbies closed?? How would you get them when needed??  If you feel you need to protect an original or a copy in a safe, be sure your agents know how to access them in an emergency.

Include with a copy of your directives all contact information for your agents so emergency responders and doctors know who to contact. Be sure your agent also has a list of current prescriptions and dosages so they can inform doctors and nurses who may not know your history.

Health care decisions are exceptionally personal and involved.  Emotions run high in medical emergencies.  Before your loved ones need to act for you financially, they may well need to act for you in the medical arena.  In our current state of affairs, indicating who can make decisions and what those decisions should be, particularly with regard to such actions as ventilators and prolonged artificial life, your wishes as to who can decide and what they should consider are vital.  Not only do health care directives equip your loved ones to act and advocate for you, they also minimize disagreements and provide guidance at a time when your loved ones need your input most.

AS A BONUS, PREPARE A GRAB-AND-GO FOLDER.

In the midst of an emergency, medical or otherwise, having information readily available is a fantastic gift for you and your loved ones.  Think of the last time you checked in at a hospital – what information did they require?  If you were unable to answer questions, would your loved ones be able to?  Think of what information you would miss if you were not able to get to your home or if your home was destroyed by fire, flood or tornado.  Could you recreate critical data easily?

 

Medical Emergency Grab-and-Go:  I suggest you prepare two folders with the following information, keep one at home or with you when you travel and give one to your health care agent who does not live with you:

Copy of your Health Care Directives (HIPAA Consent, Health Care Power of Attorney and Living Will)

List of your prescriptions 

List of allergies

List of doctors and specialists (don’t forget your dentist)

Copies of your health care insurance cards (front and back) – including Medicare and supplemental policies if applicable

Copy of your driver’s license

Emergency contact lists – important people to call

Copy of long term care insurance information

 

Emergency Replacement Grab-and-Go:  I suggest you prepare two folders with the following information, keep one at home and give the other to either your health care agent or your named Power of Attorney who does not live with you.  

Copy of your Medical Emergency Grab-and-Go documents

Copy of your birth certificate

Copy of your marriage certificate (your spouse may be hindered in receiving your social security after your death if he or she cannot provide proof of the marriage)

List of Account types and locations (even if it doesn’t include your whole account number, it will provide a place to start in locating assets).

Copy of Life Insurance policies

Copy of your Passport

Copy of your credit cards

 There is dispute as to whether you should include a copy of your social security card in this folder, as including that with the items listed above is everything a thief needs to steal your identity.  The same discussions are had regarding passwords.  A trusted cloud-based storage company may be a solution, as is a partially complete folder for each of two different people.  At the very least, someone other than you needs to know how to access copies of these items and the ability to reproduce them if your home is destroyed is invaluable.

Unless you have experienced it yourself, you cannot imagine the amount of information that is necessary to complete a Medicaid application, finalize a funeral or handle an estate after a death.  The more you can arm your loved ones with information, the more you make a difficult situation more manageable.

Remember that storing these things in a safety deposit box presumes that others have a spare key, know where the box is located and are authorized to access because you have completed the necessary forms at the bank.  Storing them in a safe presumes others can access the place where the safe is located and know how to open it.  In our digital world, scanning all of this information onto one or more portable devices like a jump drive provides easy access and compact storage.  Back up copies of your home computer or laptop is also highly recommended.

Be ready for any emergency.  Organize.  Update. Copy.   

Door County confirms 10th case of COVID-19

After going two weeks without a positive test of the novel coronavirus, Door County Public Health officials announced the tenth case on Friday afternoon.  Seven cases have recovered to date and two remain active.  Door County reported its only death on April 13th.  There is no evidence of community spread in Door County.  The positive cases are not concentrated in any one locality and are scattered throughout the county.   There have been 271 tests performed with a total of 226 negative results and 35 tests pending.  No other details will be disclosed due to privacy laws.

 

Birch Creek cancels summer performances

All summer programs, sessions, and performances for the summer season at Birch Creek Music Performance Center in Egg Harbor will have to wait until next year.  Birch Creek’s Board of Trustees and Executive Director Mona Christensen announced on Friday the cancellation of the 2020 Summer season scheduled from June 1 through August 10.  Christensen shares what went into making the difficult decision. 

 

 

Christiansen adds that Birch Creek is developing programs to allow musicians to learn through virtual online lessons and masterclasses that connect faculty with students.   The adult band camp, chamber music retreat in August, and the fall concert series that starts on September 5 are still planned for later this summer.  Birch Creek will be posting updates, interviews with faculty on their website, and social media platforms. The full press release is shown below.

 

 

 

For Immediate Release

 

Message from Birch Creek’s Executive Director and Board of Trustees

 

Egg Harbor, WI – After careful review of available information relating to the impact of COVID-19, the Birch Creek Board of Trustees and Executive Director have unanimously voted to cancel Birch Creek’s 2020 summer season, including all events, programs, sessions, and performances from June 1 through August 10. 

 

Birch Creek administrative staff, and the board members who guide them, have always had at the heart of their decision making the safety of the students who study there, the communities who visit their campus, attend concerts, teach, work, and volunteer there. 

 

The health and safety of those who live on Birch Creek’s campus and those from the larger community of music lovers who join them each summer was the board’s highest priority when making this difficult decision to close. In any given summer, talented students, staff, and faculty from across the nation convene on the Egg Harbor campus in the heart of Door County to collaborate in a life-changing teaching-learning environment. Birch Creek offers 30 concerts in eight weeks, plus numerous free outreach performances off-campus throughout Door County. In all, Birch Creek reached over 17,000 people between paid and free concerts last year. The impact of a Birch Creek summer academy cancellation in the Door County community is profound. “We are heartbroken,” said Executive Director Mona Christensen.

 

In 2019, Birch Creek enrolled 173 students from eight states and six countries; employed 87 summer faculty from 15 states; and hired 20 interns and counselors from around the Midwest. Students and faculty travel to Birch Creek from across the US and abroad. The massive speed and spread of COVID-19 has caused the music academy to rethink the efficacy of long-distance travel, residential living accommodations, and bringing large audiences together. Even with the most stringent health and safety protocols in place, the organization cannot fully mitigate risk. These safety issues, together with widespread concern facing Birch Creek’s constituencies of older populations and the families of students, point to significant challenges in maintaining the high-quality programming for which Birch Creek is known.

 

Students are the heart of Birch Creek’s mission and safety at the core of its operations. The overarching guidance from the Board of Trustees is to follow a response to the coronavirus pandemic that plans wisely for both the immediate season and the economic health of the coming years. For 44 years, Birch Creek has given young artists a most powerful environment to connect with one another, study with world-class faculty and build life-long friendships. “We are devastated that we will not have the opportunity to share that Birch Creek legacy this summer,” began Christensen, “but we are prepared to meet this challenge with creativity, with families, students, patrons, donors, faculty, sponsors and volunteers in mind.”

 

Please visit the Birch Creek website at birchcreek.org for announcements about upcoming concerts and events later this year.  

 

Birch Creek Music Performance Center is Door County’s Residential Summer Music Academy in Egg Harbor, WI, for advanced young musicians pursing a career path in music. For 44 years, students in Percussion & Steel Band, Symphony, and Big Band Jazz have been taught by nationally known performers and educators during the day and performed alongside them in concerts at night. Birch Creek will return to its Academy programming in 2021.

 

 2020 Fall Concert Series begins on September 5 through December 5.

 

 

Sturgeon Bay Open Bass Tournament sets new date, location

A new date for the Sturgeon Bay Open Bass Tournament means a return to the city limits for the 30th annual event. Now a part of the Bass Pro Shops/Cabela’s North American Bass Challenge Circuit, the original dates of May 15th and 16th had to be scratched because of COVID-19 concerns. The move to Sawyer Park in Sturgeon Bay was made when the tournament’s new dates of September 11th and 12th set up a potential log jam of boats at Wave Point Marina, where the event has been held in recent years.  Sturgeon Bay Open Bass Tournament Committee President Wendy Heim says the organization's commitment to the safety of the community made the decision to postpone rather than cancel easy.

The change will make the tournament’s annual fall event a bigger affair with all of the same prizes still awarded to the top anglers. Those previously registered for the spring Sturgeon Bay Open Bass Tournament will be automatically enrolled in the fall event unless a refund is requested.

Golf course opens with precautions

Golfers who are tired of being pent-up, your long wait is now over.  27 Pines Golf Course in Sturgeon Bay is open for the season with steps in place to address health concerns.  Owner Tom Schmelzer says the course will be spacing out tee times as part of social distancing recommendations.  He also says steps are in place to help golfers get on the links with reduced risks of contracting any illnesses.

 

 

Schmelzer also says some golfers should be ready to carry their own bags.  He says carts will be available to those with mobility issues or golfers who are family members like husbands and wives or parents and siblings.  Each request will be decided on a case-by-case basis. 

 

(Photo Courtesy of 27 Pines Golf Course)

Building homes for food

Door County Habitat for Humanity volunteers are still building for people, just on a smaller scale. The Sturgeon Bay-based non-profit has partnered with American Petroleum to construct and place three little food pantries for churches on the city’s west side. Volunteer Dan Hubing used donated cabinets from ReStore to build the pantries that are open 24/7 for people to donate and pick up from if needed. ReStore manager Megan Dietz says they are happy they were able to help.

Dietz says the project filled a void for its volunteers, which will likely not come together to work on the organization’s 43rd home build or a variety of other projects until Governor Tony Evers’ Safer at Home Order is lifted.

Stimulus bill heads to President's desk

All seven Wisconsin members of the House of Representatives, including local Rep. Mike Gallagher, voted in favor of a bill sending billions to small businesses and those working on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic. The bill sends over $300 billion to replenish the Payroll Protection Program and a separate small-business emergency loan program along with $100 billion in aid to fight the coronavirus at health care providers. Speaking to DoorCountyDailyNews.com last week, Rep. Gallagher says more testing is needed to help reopen the states quickly and safely.

In a release following the vote on Thursday, Rep. Gallagher criticized Democrats for letting the funding of the Payroll Protection Program lapse in the first place. He also called for the House of Representatives to stay in session instead of leaving Washington D.C. until potentially May 4th. The bill now awaits the signature of President Donald Trump.

No "Safer at Home Order" citations issued yet in Door County

Although 18 formal complaints have been filed to date in Door County, no citations have been issued by local law enforcement agencies over the “Safer at Home Order”.  In a joint informational release issued on social media Thursday, Door County Sheriff Tammy Sternard, Sturgeon Bay Police Chief Arleigh Porter and District Attorney Colleen Nordin asked the public “to consider how both your actions and statements may affect others during this difficult time.  All of the 18 formal complaints regarding possible violations were investigated to date and none have been referred to the District Attorney’s Office for criminal prosecution.  The law enforcement agencies noted in the release that they appreciate the willingness of citizens to voluntarily comply with the order and recommendations handed down by other agencies overseeing the unprecedented health emergency.  You can see the complete Facebook post on DoorCountyDailyNews.com.  Sheriff Sternard and Police Chief Porter could not be reached for comment on Thursday. 

 

 

 

Lifetime Achievement Award winner Shefchik credits community

One week after being surprised and honored by the Volunteer Center of Door County’s Karl May Lifetime Achievement Award, Fran Shefchik wants people to know the impact the community has had on him and his family.  Receiving the award named after Karl May, brought special meaning to Shefchik some 40 years after moving to Sturgeon Bay.

 

 

Shefchik, who is currently board chair of the Boys and Girls Club of Door County and a member of the Sturgeon Bay Breakfast Rotary Club, says volunteering has always been about giving back to the community he loves.

 

 

Shefchik retired three years ago from Portside Builders in Sturgeon Bay, a company he founded.  Corpus Christi Church was Shefchik’s first venture into volunteering 37 years ago when he was the finance manager for the parish.    

 

(photo courtesy of Portside Builders)

 

Gravesite marker stolen in Baileys Harbor

A symbolic gravestone marker was reportedly stolen in the Town of Baileys Harbor cemetery recently. According to a social media post on Tuesday by Gil Gerdman, a solid metal eagle that was attached to his fishing buddy Phil McGuire’s gravesite is missing. McGuire was a Texan who spent summers in Door County and loved to take pictures of eagles and wanted to be buried in Door County. Gerdman is hoping that information leads to the return of the eagle to its rightful place. Bailey’s Harbor Town Constable Mark Merrill told DoorCountyDailyNews.com that McGuire’s widow who lives still lives in Texas, notified him about the stolen eagle. Anyone with information on the whereabouts of the eagle should call Merrill at the contact information listed below.  

 

 

Mark Merrill, Town Constable at 920-839-2204

 

(photo courtesy of Gil Gerdman)

Ninth COVID-19 case reported in Kewaunee County

The Kewaunee County Public Health Department announced the ninth confirmed case of COVID-19 on Thursday.  According to the Kewaunee County website, five cases remain active while three cases have been cleared as of 2 pm Thursday.  The only COVID-related death was reported on April 13.  The first positive case of the novel coronavirus in Kewaunee County was on April 5th.  The Kewaunee County Public Health Department is working to identify and contact others who may have been in close contact with the people diagnosed with COVID-19.  Door and Kewaunee County now both have nine confirmed cases.  No names can be released due to HIPAA laws.      

 

Hospital learning from COVID experience

Whenever the state emerges out of the COVID-19 pandemic, Door County Medical Center President and CEO Brian Stephens says they will be applying the things they are learning now for years to come. Stephens currently starts every morning on a conference call with other hospitals in northeast Wisconsin to share updates and ideas. He hopes that kind of collaboration does not disappear when the virus does.

Stephens also believes cross-training many of its employees and setting up new spaces to treat patients within the hospital serve as good preparation for the future.

Parents play important role in remote learning

Southern Door High School Principal Steve Bousley credits parents with the early success of its remote learning this year. Students at the school are participating in all of the same classes they would have been in prior to the building closing due to COVID-19, including hands-on courses like music and technical education. While the teachers have been able to adapt the way they are carrying out the lessons, it is the parents making sure the work is getting done and answering questions in need of more immediate feedback. Bousley credits the communication the school has had with its parents for making the transition from in-person to virtual learning smooth.

He also credits the district’s technology availability and partnership with the Rural Virtual Academy for making things easier for students and staff to not skip a beat despite class not being session.

Protecting the air you breathe inside and out

With more people staying indoors due to Governor Tony Evers’ Safer at Home order, the air you are breathing could be getting worse. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, Americans spend more than 90 percent of their time indoors where the concentration of air pollutants can be two to five times higher than if you were outside. That means you could be breathing in more allergens and other airborne particles over a longer period of time. Ultimate Air owner Jeff Blemke says although you cannot control what is floating around outside, having a high-quality filter for your home’s heating and cooling system could limit the harm you are breathing inside.

Blemke says people living in older homes tend to not have the same issues because they are built more energy-efficient, which limits the amount of air exchanged through walls and windows with the outside.

Senate sends more help to small businesses, frontlines

Wisconsin U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin was among the supporters of another $480 billion in relief for those affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The new deal will send an additional $310 billion to help small businesses through the Paycheck Protection Program. Designed to help save jobs in the business community, the forgivable loan program quickly ran out of its original $350 billion from the CARES act. Senator Baldwin says the quick use of the original funds showed how great the public health and economic needs are in the country.

The bill also sends over $100 billion more to the frontlines to expand COVID-19 testing and cover additional expenses related to the pandemic. It now awaits the approval of the House of Representatives and the signature of President Donald Trump.

Sturgeon Bay Math team takes second at state

Falling just three points short of first place, the Sturgeon Bay High School Math team finished an impressive season by placing second in the state Class B competition.  Sturgeon Bay scored 119 points while Chilton High School claimed the title with 122.  Math teacher and coach Cliff Wind says the individual schools held the state meet the week of March 9th when school was still in session.  The state results were posted recently and Wind explains how the state questions differ from a conference meet.

 

 

First-team all-state winners for Sturgeon Bay were Michael Laxo, Fletcher Hubbard, and Henry Pudlo.  Other members of the state team included Nick Herbst, Marina Jeanquart, Abram Abeyta, Carter Henry, and Andrew Konop.  

 

Campgrounds to reopen in Door County

The temporary closure of all campgrounds within Door County that was issued last Thursday has been revised. Door County Public Health announced Wednesday that campgrounds would be allowed to open and remain in operation subject to specific criteria.   According to the news release, Public Health Manager Susan Powers determined that the modified health order will allow for non-dependent campsites starting this Friday.  Public facilities at the campgrounds will not be open, and all private gatherings of any number of people at a site are prohibited.  The Revised Health Order is consistent with Governor Tony Evers’ Safer at Home Order and will remain in effect through May 26.  You can find the complete news release from Door County Public Health with this story below.

 

 

 

 

 


REVISED Health Order: Modified Campground Operations in Door County 
 
Health Order: A Temporary Closure of All Campgrounds within Door County was issued on April 15, 2020. After further review, I have determined, in my role as local health officer under Sec. 252.03, Wis. Stats., that campgrounds within Door County may open and remain in operation subject to all the following: 
 
A. Only non-dependent camping sites/units (i.e., sites/units with their own bathrooms, kitchens and showers) may be occupied; B. Limit all sites/units to members of a single household or living unit; C. All other private gatherings of any number of people at a site/unit are prohibited; D. Campers need to maintain social distancing of six (6) feet with anyone outside of their household group; E. Prohibit the use of buildings or public spaces that would encourage social gatherings of any number of people…including closure of exercise facilities, hot tubs, picnic areas, public bathrooms and showers, swimming areas, and swimming pools; F. Staff shall routinely clean surfaces of commonly touched by campers with an EPA registered product for use against Coronavirus.  G. Campground owners shall encourage social distancing, hand hygiene, and cleaning in the workplace to protect employees.  H. Comply with Emergency Order #28 “Safer at Home”, including the requirements of Sections 13.b (selling groceries and medicine), 13.d (restaurant operations), and 13.e (bar operation); I. Prohibit guests from congregating in lobbies or other common areas and provide adequate space to adhere to social distancing requirements while queuing for front desk, store or other services; and J. Comply with all other applicable Wisconsin Department of Health Services guidelines for businesses. 

 The above are deemed reasonable and necessary to prevent, suppress and control the COVID-19 virus consistent with Sec. 252.03, Wis. Stats.  The decision to allow campgrounds to open under these guidelines was made in part, after campground owners came forward with ideas for practices that aim to ensure a safe environment and indicated they were willing to put those practices in place.  
 
This revised Health Order is intended to be, and should be interpreted as being, consistent with  Governor Evers’ Executive Order (EO) #28.  EO #28 permits only essential travel, and states that individuals are strongly encouraged to remain at their primary residence or home. Travel to second homes or residences should be avoided if possible. Wisconsinites are encouraged to stay close to home and strongly discouraged from engaging in unnecessary travel. 
 
This Revised Health Order is effective April 24, 2020 and will remain in full force and effect through May 26, 2020 or as long as Executive Order #28 is in effect, whichever is longer. 
If you have questions or immediate needs related to COVID-19, call 2-1-1 or text COVID-19 to 211-211. For up-to-date information, please frequently monitor the Door County Government website https://www.co.door.wi.gov/  Door County Public Health Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/doorcountypublichealth/ and the DHS website for updates, and to follow @DHSWI on Facebook and Twitter, or DHS WI on Instagram. Additional information can be found on the CDC website.

Door County works through virtual issues to seat new board

Technical problems delayed the Door County Board of Supervisors meeting Tuesday by twenty minutes, but the organizational meeting agenda was able to be accomplished within three hours.  Utilizing video conferencing and an online voting tool, the board overcame the slight delay and had the 20 seated supervisors participating either in-person or virtually.    After the swearing-in of the newly elected supervisors, the board voted to re-elect Dave Lienau as Chairperson and elect Susan Kohout as the Vice-chair.  County Administrator Ken Pabich says the board then was updated on the COVID-19 situation in Door County.  He surmises that Door County will align their current State of Emergency with Governor Evers extended Safer at Home Order.

 

 

In other business, the Door County Board discussed the addition of recent expenditures taken on by the county, which Pabich categorized as not significant. 
Supervisors were assigned to Committees, Commissions, and Boards during Tuesday's meeting as well.

Kewaunee Artisan Center preps more face masks

The Kewaunee Artisan Center is readying for another face mask distribution event. Initially, they donated to area hospitals and first responders. Then they handed out around 200 masks in the City of Kewaunee. Friday, it will be Algoma’s turn, and City Administrator Jared Heyn says it is shaping up to be the largest distribution yet.

 


All residents are welcome. The event will start at noon in the south parking lot next to City Hall and the Algoma Public Library.

 

City to consider extending emergency declaration, financial recovery

When the 60-day state of emergency period expires, municipalities like Sturgeon Bay are wondering what will happen next if the COVID-19 pandemic continues. The 60-day state of emergency for Sturgeon Bay expires on May 19th, but it could be extended if the council approves a new resolution and it has an end date per state statute. Sturgeon Bay Mayor David Ward told council members it is also time to start discussing the financial hit the city has taken because of the pandemic and some of the government funding that can help.

Part of the financial presentation at the May 5th meeting will be a look at the city’s budget and an audit of its finances. In the city administrator’s report, Josh Van Lieshout said that all essential services in Sturgeon Bay such as public safety have been operating smoothly with the proper precautions in place.

Scouts adapt to advance

Red Smith Middle School student Derek Arcand never thought he would have to juggle a pandemic with his role as the senior patrol leader of Scouts BSA Troop 1042. Youth organizations like Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, and 4-H have not been able to meet in-person for over a month due to concerns with COVID-19.  For Arcand, that means using Zoom for everything from virtual merit badge sessions with counselors to troop and patrol meetings. He misses meeting up with his fellow scouts and working on his advancement, but the Star-rank scout is taking away valuable experience from all of this.

4-H, Boy Scouts of America, and Girl Scouts of the USA have been providing virtual meetings and remote activities for their members and the general public to use during the time they have not been able to meet. Bay-Lakes Council BSA will also be reprising its “Camp-In” experience on May 1st at 6:30 p.m.

DCMC to offer virtual COVID-19 screenings

Those looking for more answers on whether or not they may have COVID-19 can now get them virtually from Door County Medical Center. With a few clicks of the mouse, patients with minor to moderate symptoms can schedule a virtual screening with a nurse practitioner. Door County Medical Center Chief Medical Officer Dr. Jim Heise says evaluating symptoms and making recommendations can all be done in the comfort of your own home.

Community members will still be able to contact the free COVID-19 hotline if they have any concerns. You can find more details about the virtual visits from Door County Medical Center below.

 

PRESS RELEASE FROM DOOR COUNTY MEDICAL CENTER


Sturgeon Bay, WI. Door County Medical Center (DCMC) announces free virtual online COVID-19 (Novel Coronavirus) screening now available via the DCMC Patient Portal for individuals who are concerned about whether they have contracted or been exposed to COVID-19.

In addition to the DCMC COVID-19 Hotline, patients can now log into or set up a profile on the DCMC Patient Portal (www.mydoorcountyhealth.org) to schedule a virtual visit in the comfort of their own home with a Nurse Practitioner through a computer or mobile device.  

These free virtual visits are for individuals with minor to moderate symptoms. Individuals can schedule their visit via the DCMC Patient Portal. First time users can follow the prompts to set up their profile.

 

During the virtual visit, DCMC clinicians will evaluate symptoms such as fever, cough and shortness of breath, discuss known risk factors, answer questions and recommend next steps including referring people to the right location for an in-person visit if needed. 

Community members can still call the DCMC COVID-19 Hotline for free to address their COVID-19 concerns. That number is (920) 746-3700. The Hotline is open seven days a week from 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM.

 

It is important to know your healthcare options and make informed choices. These options are designed for patients to connect with a medical professional if they feel they have COVID-19 symptoms. Virtual visits are intended to address COVID-19 healthcare concerns in a timely manner in an effort to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

 

Get more information about virtual screening at www.dcmedical.org/patient-portal. 

Seniors deal with loss of school year

The last day of school usually comes with a dose of excitement, but not necessarily for high school seniors in Door and Kewaunee counties. Schools have been restricted to remote learning since March 18th and their buildings will likely remain closed for the duration of the academic year. That means no prom or traditional high school graduations for the area’s seniors, many of which that have gone to the same building for classes since they were in kindergarten. Gibraltar student Brandon Stillman was planning on playing baseball this spring before the school board closed their buildings for the year last week and the WIAA officially axed the spring sports season on Tuesday. Before he starts this fall as a sports business major at Arizona State, he wished he would have known when his time at Gibraltar was going to end before it did.

Stillman has still been able to connect with friends while away from school and looks forward to coming back to the building as a proud alum. Even though the doors are closed school districts across the state are still required to offer remote learning opportunities through the end of their scheduled year for their students.

 

 

Picture taken from last year's baseball season

Sturgeon Bay poll workers rewarded

The city of Sturgeon Bay recognized the dedication of its poll workers Tuesday with a raise. The Sturgeon Bay Common Council voted unanimously to raise the wage for the poll workers for the April 7th election from $9 to $15. Polling locations faced worker shortages and other unique circumstances for the spring election due to concerns surrounding COVID-19. Mayor David Ward saluted City Clerk Stephanie Reinhardt, her staff, and the poll workers for the extra effort that had to be put in to make the day successful.

Council members also took time to thank poll workers, even recognizing the many that took their checks from Election Day and donated it to local food pantries. Tuesday’s meeting also served as the city’s organizational meeting by seating the newly elected council members, placing them into committees, and re-electing Dan Williams as the council’s president.

Earth Day 2020 takes on additional meaning

The 50th anniversary of Earth Day will be celebrated differently this year around the world Wednesday, but a local environmental organizer says the significance of movement never changes.  Wayne Kudick of Fish Creek, who has organized many Earth Day events in Door County in the past, says Earth Day was started in 1970 by Governor Gaylord Nelson.  He shares the worldwide efforts represented by Earth Day beyond the celebration.

 

 

“Earth Day, Every Day” events planned in Door County this month were canceled due to the precautions taken to prevent the COVID-19 spread.  The theme for Earth Day 2020 is climate action.  

 

Flood insurance in high demand with rising lake levels

As Lake Michigan water levels continue to rise this spring, many waterfront property owners are inquiring about flood insurance.  Nicole Kirsten of Robertson Ryan & Associates in Kewaunee says it is a good time to check with your insurance agent on existing policies.  She notes flooding is not usually covered in most homeowner policies.

 

 

Kirsten adds that there are different flood zones in areas that are more prone to flooding and rates are based on those specific locations.  New flood insurance policies typically require a 30-day window before coverage becomes active. 

 

Volunteer Center of Door County salutes Golden Heart Recipients

In celebration of all volunteers in Door County, the 2020 Virtual Golden Heart Awards were presented last Thursday.  The event honored organizations and individuals throughout Door County with five categories receiving recognition.  Delilah Rose, a senior at Southern Door High School was one of three students that won the Youth Golden Heart Scholarship Award.  A student correspondent for DoorCountyDailyNews.com, Rose shares what volunteering means to her. 

 

 

Rose is involved in the Big Brothers Big Sisters program in Door County and volunteers at the United Methodist Church during Thanksgiving week every year.  Other students receiving awards included Ava Carmody of Sturgeon Bay and Kayla Scharrig of Gibraltar.  The Adult Volunteer of the Year was Sandy Orsted of the Belgian Heritage Center.  Fran Schefchik won the Karl May Lifetime of Service Award.  The WPS Environmental Stewardship Award went to Bobby Deggendorf and Steve Umentum of Sunrise Explorer Leaders.  Edge & Life Teen Core Members of Youth Ministry for the Catholic Churches won the Volunteer Group of the Year. 

 

 

 

 

Republicans ask Supreme Court to block Governor's "Safer at Home" extension

The leadership of the Republican Party in Madison is asking the highest court in the state to stop Governor Tony Evers’ statewide “Safer at Home” order that was extended through May and is keeping businesses closed.  District One Representative Joel Kitchens says the GOP leaders are looking to have the Wisconsin Supreme Court take away State Health Secretary Andrea Palm’s unlimited powers during public emergencies.

 

 

Kitchens says the argument is that an unelected person should not have control like that over the state.  He notes that the Republicans are not trying to take away any powers of Governor Evers.  When the Governor’s 60-day executive order power ends on May 12, Rep. Kitchens hopes that Republicans can sit down with Governor Evers and reach a compromise on how to reopen Wisconsin moving forward.

Joski follows public health department's advice

Kewaunee County Sheriff Matt Joski considers Governor Tony Evers’ extension of the Safer at Home order to be more of a public health concern than that of law enforcement. Over the weekend, sheriffs in the counties of Shawano, Dodge, and Racine pushed back on the order extension that has forced many businesses to work in a limited fashion if not completely shut down. Joski respects the opinion of his colleagues across the state but says sometimes you need to know when to lead and when to follow. He plans on following the advice of Kewaunee County Public Health Director Cindy Kinnard.

As of Tuesday morning, Kewaunee County had eight positive cases of COVID-19 including one death. 

 

 

FROM SHERIFF MATT JOSKI

I have been asked to share my thoughts on the recent extension of the ‘Safer At Home” orders put out by Governor Evers recently, and how these orders impact my role as Kewaunee County’s elected Sheriff.

 

I begin by stating that I take my oath of office very seriously, and I fully appreciate the faith that this community has placed in my abilities and judgment over the past 13 years as the Sheriff of Kewaunee County. There has never been a moment that I would hesitate to stand up for the freedoms and liberty of each and every person in this county regardless of their age, race, gender, or religious beliefs.

 

The word freedom has been used quite a bit in recent conversations, and rightfully so. As Americans, we cherish our freedoms, we fight for those freedoms and many have died for those freedoms. Our entire structure of government is predicated on the rights and freedoms of the individual to make their own decisions, and thereby forge their own destiny. The framers of our Constitution knew full well the value of freedom and liberty and took every opportunity to minimize any possible encroachment upon its citizen’s rights by this or any other government. 

 

Unfortunately, over the years, the word freedom has been used to justify behavior which by any reasonable person’s judgment would seem reckless, and in some cases horrific. We see so many cases where this amazing gift of freedom is high jacked for the purpose of personal redemption.

 

Whenever I am asked to speak in regards to freedom, I make sure to include another word which is just as valuable in a freedom loving society; accountability. If we advocate for absolute freedom void of accountability, we will find ourselves in a world without discipline, empathy and compassion. All that would matter is whether or not I possessed the freedom to act in a given way; not taking into consideration the implications that those actions may have on another.

 

We find examples of this even in our own constitutional right of free speech. That freedom does not allow me to yell “Bomb” on an airplane, nor does it protect me from speech that would be threatening or abusive.

 

So here we are in the midst of a global pandemic. I will be honest that I have my own personal opinion regarding what actions I should or shouldn’t be taking in response to the various recommendations and orders, but those are opinions I keep to myself, as this is not about me or my personal freedom. This about how my actions and the actions of those around me could impact those at risk. This is not a law enforcement emergency, this is a public health emergency and I know enough about leadership to know that there is a time to lead and a time to follow. In this case I am following the directions of my local Public Health Director Cindy Kinnard. She too has been and continues to be a faithful servant of this county, and if she tells me that there is continued community spread, I must trust in her knowledge and adhere to proper prevention to minimize the spread of this virus. I support both my President and my Governor in the many efforts which they are leading to bring us through this challenge. The decisions that need to be made in regards to the opening of our State and our Country need to take into account both the rights of our citizens along with fact based prudence to protect those who may be vulnerable.

 

 

I look to those we have placed in both State and National public office to step forward and show leadership even if by stepping forward you find yourself standing alongside an unlikely ally. We have an amazing opportunity to demonstrate to our youth, what we are capable of when faced with adversity. We may never know if we over reacted or under reacted in our response to this pandemic, but what will matter is that we came through it together and through it all we maintained our sense of decency and respect for each other.

 

Exercising possible while quarantined

While some people have been stuck indoors for the last several weeks, silent sports enthusiasts in Door County are still finding ways to stay active. The World Health Organization recommends people 18 years and up to get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity during the week while taking the proper social distancing and hygiene measures to stay protected. That means cyclists, runners, and other athletes have been able to still hit the road to get in workouts. Racing has been a little different as many events have been canceled or postponed this spring. The Run the Door Race Series, which has had four events canceled this year, recently hosted their first virtual run with proceeds benefiting the Door County Emergency Support Coalition. Organizer Bob Richards says there are more benefits to staying active than just staying physically healthy.

If you cannot make it outside, the Door County YMCA has been offering resources to help people stay active indoors online.

Districts begin senior recognition early

Even though high school seniors in Door and Kewaunee Counties have seen their final year cut short, their respective districts are taking long lengths to make sure their achievements are honored. Southern Door, Sevastopol, and Gibraltar school districts have taken to social media to honor their seniors with short biographies and pictures. Staff from Kewaunee High School took to the streets over the weekend to decorate the front yard of seniors’ homes with signs. Kewaunee High School principal Mike Bennett says even in the midst of everything going around them, the seniors still deserve their moment.

While most events like concerts, sporting events, and dances have been canceled, plans for graduation throughout the peninsula remain up in the air. Southern Door, Kewaunee, and Luxemburg-Casco school districts took extra time this month to honor their spring sports athletes by turning on the lights at their athletic fields.

 

Picture courtesy of Kewaunee School District Facebook page

 

 

Door County health officials cautiously optimistic

Door County Medical Center Chief Medical Officer Dr. Jim Heise and Door County Public Health Manager Sue Powers like what they are seeing when it comes to the area's COVID-19 trends. Hosting their sixth Facebook Live session on Monday night, Powers announced that seven of the nine patients who had COVID-19 have since recovered. Heise says they have seen fewer calls to their COVID-19 hotline, but they have tested a similar number of people as testing becomes more available. While he understands people being anxious about getting back to a new normal, Heise emphasized the importance of still being patient to prevent a possible resurgence.

Powers and Heise both acknowledged the frustrations of tracking the virus, saying they are still learning as they go, especially when it comes to the impact COVID-19 has on specific individuals.

Kewaunee County Board to meet at Fairgrounds Expo Hall

To meet the guidelines of social distancing, the new Kewaunee County Board of Supervisors will be holding their meeting next week in a new location.  The change of venue will be at the Kewaunee County Expo Hall in Luxemburg for the board members to allow for six feet of social distancing.  County Clerk Jamie Annoye says that although the public may not attend, they can submit comments in advance and watch the board meeting online.

 

 

Annoye adds that the board will be electing a new president and vice-chair as well as appointing committee members.  The live stream of the Kewaunee County Board of Supervisors will be available starting at 3 pm with the meeting starting at 4 pm next Tuesday.  You can find the contact information to send your comments below.   


annoye.jamie@kewauneeco.org

 

 

 

 

Local domestic violence impacted by COVID-19 ramifications

The COVID-19 pandemic may be increasing domestic violence, and child abuse as more Americans are staying home for their safety.  Help of Door County Executive Director Milly Gonzales says her organization initially received a spike of calls from pressured victims in unhealthy relationships.  

 


Gonzales says national directors have told her that overall call numbers were slightly down in early April, but sexual assaults reported to law enforcement have increased.  You can find more information on services provided by Help of Door County with the link below.

 

www.helpofdoorcounty.org

Your resilience can help overcome pandemic challenges -- Mental Health Minute

Increasing your resilience can help you cope with the unknowns of the COVID-19 pandemic according to Sturgeon Bay psychologist Dr. Dennis White. He says we all have the qualities to overcome the daily stresses that can lead to anxiety and fear on several levels.

 

 

Dr. White adds that you can adapt and recover from stress and adversity.  He recommends reading an article by Dr. Reggie Ferreira called “Resilience in the Shadow of Catastrophe”.  The writings share how individuals, families, and communities endure trauma.  You can find a link to that story and Dr. White’s current Mental Health Minute below. 

 

  
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/resilience-in-the-shadow-catastrophe

 

 

 

Governor reveals reopen plan; no new COVID-19 cases in Door County

Governor Tony Evers announced a plan to reopen Wisconsin on Monday.  The Badger Bounce Back is a multi-phase plan.  The three phases by the state would begin when there are 14 consecutive days of decreasing COVID-19 cases.  The state would progress through the stages by meeting goals in testing, tracing, tracking, personal protective equipment levels, and surge readiness of health care’s capacity.  The Door County Public Health Department reported numbers on Monday that reflected no new cases of COVID-19.  There have been 217 tests performed with 190 being negative.  That reflects an additional 20 negative tests since last Friday.  The most recent confirmed case of the coronavirus in Door County was on April 10th. The first COVID-19-related death was last Monday.  You can find the Governor Evers’ Badger Bounce Back plan and the situational update below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

State of Wisconsin Department of Health Services Tony Evers, Governor Andrea Palm, Secretary 
EMERGENCY ORDER #31 Badger Bounce Back 
WHEREAS, in December, 2019, a novel strain of the coronavirus was detected, now named COVID-19, and it has spread throughout the world, including every state in the United States; 
WHEREAS, on January 30, 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern; 
WHEREAS, on March 12, 2020, Governor Tony Evers declared a public health emergency and directed all agencies support efforts to respond to and contain COVID-19 in Wisconsin; 
WHEREAS, on March 13, 2020, President Donald Trump proclaimed a National Emergency concerning COVID-19; 
WHEREAS, as of April 19, 2020, 2,241,359 people around the world have tested positive for COVID-19, including 690,714 in the United States and 4,346 in Wisconsin; 
WHEREAS, COVID-19 is present throughout Wisconsin, with people testing positive for COVID-19 in 65 of 72 counties as of April 19, 2020; 
WHEREAS, on March 24, 2020, I, Andrea Palm, Secretary-designee of the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, issued Emergency Order #12, Safer at Home Order (hereinafter "Safer at Home Order"), requiring that everyone in Wisconsin stay at their home or place of residence except in limited circumstances; 
WHEREAS, on April 16, 2020, I modified and extended the Safer at Home Order to allow businesses new opportunities to get back to work and added new measures to keep employees and customers safer; 
WHEREAS, the Safer at Home Order is working to flatten the curve of infections of COVID-19 in Wisconsin, and we have started to see meaningful gains from this proactive step; 
WHEREAS, we know that the Safer at Home Order is working to prevent spikes in COVID-19 cases that could further strain our health care system and risk more lives; 
1 West Wilson Street • Post Office Box 7850 • Madison, WI 53707-7850 • Telephone 608-266-9622 • www.dhs.wisconsin.gov Protecting and promoting the health and safety of the people of Wisconsin 
WHEREAS, with the progress Wisconsin has made in flattening the curve and slowing the spread of COVID-19, we must look ahead to plan for how Wisconsin will return to business as usual; 
WHEREAS, President Donald Trump's Guidelines for Opening Up America Again, issued on April 16, 2020, offer a comprehensive and thoughtful approach to restarting the economy without sacrificing the public health gains we have made in fighting this disease; 
WHEREAS, led by science, the public health facts on the ground, and guidance from the Federal government, this Order implements a phased approach for dialing down the restriction in the Safer at Home Order; and 
WHEREAS, as we have seen, the public health situation can evolve quickly, and this phased approach will allow individuals and businesses as much relief as possible while accounting for the inherent uncertainties of this pandemic. 
NOW THEREFORE, I, Andrea Palm, Department of Health Services Secretary-designee, by the authority vested in me by the Laws of the State, including but not limited to Section 252.02(3), (4), and (6) of the Wisconsin Statutes, order the following: 
1. Phases. Wisconsin shall adopt a phased approach to re-opening its economy and society, with each phase being incrementally less restrictive on businesses and individuals while protecting the public from COVID-19. The Department of Health Services shall announce the transition to each Phase with an order fully articulating the activities that will resume. The Phases include: 
a. Safer at Home. Currently in effect, as established m Emergency Orders # 12 and #28. 
b. Phase One. Phase One will include allowing mass gatherings of up to 10 people; restaurants opening with social distancing requirements; removal of certain restrictions including retail restrictions for Essential Businesses and Operations; additional operations for non-essential businesses; K-12 schools to resume inperson operation; and child care settings resuming full operation. 
c. Phase Two. Phase Two will include allowing mass gatherings of up to 50 people; restaurants resuming full operation; bars reopening with social distancing requirements; non-essential businesses resuming operations with social distancing requirements; and postsecondary education institutions may resume operation. 

d. Phase Three. Phase Three will resume all business activity and gatherings, with minimal protective and preventative measures in place for the general public and more protective measures for vulnerable populations. 
2. Progression through the Phases. The Department of Health Services shall assess the most up-to-date data to determine when it is appropriate to progress to the next Phase. To move to the next Phase, the state must make progress toward the goals identified below as Core Responsibilities and meet the Gating Criteria. 
a. Core Responsibilities. The state must show progress or advancement in the following areas: 
i. Testing. Every Wisconsin resident who has symptoms of COVID-19 has access to a lab test. Results will be reported to the patient and public health officials within 48 hours of collection. The ultimate goal is 85,000 tests per week or approximately 12,000 tests per day. 
ii. Tracing. Increase contact tracing by up to 1,000 people and implement technology solutions to ensure everyone who is infected or exposed will safely isolate or quarantine. 
iii. Tracking. Building on systems used to track influenza and the COVID-19 pandemic, track the spread of COVID-19 and report on the Wisconsin Gating Criteria and other related metrics. 
iv. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Procure PPE and other necessary supplies to support health care and public safety agencies. 
v. Health Care Capacity. Assess the need for and readiness to support surge capacity for our healthcare system. 
b. Gating Criteria. The state must meet the following Gating Criteria, based on state-wide public health data: 
i. Symptoms: 
1. Downward trajectory of influenza-like illnesses reported within a 14-day period; and 
2. Downward trajectory of COVID-19-like syndromic cases reported in a 14-day period. 

ii. Cases: Downward trajectory of positive tests as a percent of total tests within a 14-day period. 
iii. Hospitals: 
1. Treatment of all patients without crisis care; 
2. Robust testing programs in place for at-risk healthcare workers; and 
3. Decreasing numbers of infected healthcare workers. 
3. Interim progress within a Phase. In addition to progressing through each Phase above, the Department of Health Services, in consultation with the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation, shall issue additional orders to reduce restrictions on certain businesses or sectors if it is determined that removing the restrictions will have minimal impact on the state's ability to meet its Core Responsibilities and Gating Criteria. 
4. Local orders. The Department of Health Services, in consultation with local health officials, may address localized outbreaks with a localized order. Such order may include adjusting the Phase or instituting tailored restrictions based on the needs of a particular location, county, or region. 
5. Safer at Home remains in effect. Nothing in this Order modifies, alters, or supersedes Emergency Orders #12 and #28, Safer at Home Order. However, orders instituting the phases under Section 2 and interim orders reducing restrictions under Section 3 may be issued prior to the expiration of Emergency Order #28, if appropriate under the criteria stated above. 
6. Severability. If any provision of this Order or its application to any person or circumstance is held to be invalid, then the remainder of the Order, including the application of such part or provision to other persons or circumstances, shall not be affected and shall continue in full force and effect. To this end, the provisions of this Order are severable. 
7. Supremacy. This Order supersedes any local order that is in conflict with s order. 
Secretary-designee Department of Health Services State of Wisconsin 
 

 

Industry diversity helping Wisconsin

Door County Economic Development Corporation Executive Director Steve Jenkins credits Wisconsin’s wide range of industries for helping it weather the economic storm brought on by COVID-19. According to WalletHub.com, Wisconsin has had the third lowest increase in unemployment claims out of 50 states and the District of Columbia. Jenkins says the strength of its manufacturing has kept the state afloat compared to others since it is considered an essential business. Even if it lasts into the summer and changes do have to be made, he is confident local manufacturers will do right by their employees.

Jenkins applauds all local businesses for the way they have had to adjust to what is happening around them so they can continue to operate and take advantage of a different normal.

 

Photo courtesy of the DCEDC

Door County showing community strength in numbers

Sister Bay/Liberty Grove Fire Chief Chris Hecht says he is not surprised that the county’s response to supporting each other during the COVID-19 pandemic has left some volunteers with little to do. Over 550 people have signed up to volunteer their time with the Door County Emergency Support Coalition, which has been spearheaded by the Door County Fire Chiefs Association. Filling up grocery carts for homebound shoppers, organizing meal trains for the less fortunate, and working polling sites are just some of the wide variety of things the volunteers have been asked to do. Hecht says even if you are not doing as much to help as you would like to, don’t stop trying.

Hecht also says people in need of assistance should not be afraid to ask either. Approximately 3,000 volunteer hours have been logged by the Door County Emergency Support Coalition, a number Hecht believes is much lower than reality.

 

 

Screenshot from Door County Fire Chiefs Association video

Republicans weigh options after order extension

The month-long extension of Governor Tony Evers’ Safer at Home Order will likely be making its way to the Wisconsin Supreme Court. Assembly Speaker Robin Vos and Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald said last week they were looking into options to move up the order extension date from May 26th. Opponents say by extending the Safer at Home Order past the deadline of Governor’s state of emergency, he could be operating outside of Wisconsin statutes. State Senator Andre Jacque says it has been hard to tell business owners that their operation is not considered essential. He believes the benchmarks being used to determine if it is safe or not to lift the order sooner like other nearby states should be better defined.

Jacque supports a phased approach to making sure parts of the economy can reopen safely, similar to what has been introduced in other states. Democratic State Senator Dave Hansen supported Governor Evers’ decision on Friday, saying the state is nowhere near ready to safely end the Safer at Home Order under the guidelines outlined last week by President Donald Trump.

 

 

Annie's keeps sewing on

Even though her storefront is closed to the public, the machines at Annie’s Quilt and Lodge in Kewaunee have not stopped. Ann Maloney opened her quilting shop and Airbnb rental back in September where she wanted to house her new computerized long-arm quilting machine. The closure of Shopko last year changed that a little bit as she added a retail section to help fill a void for those looking for fabric and thread. Maloney says that it has been beneficial for a community that has produced hundreds of cloth facemasks for hospitals and general use.

Maloney has been operating curbside for the last several weeks because as she says, the Safer at Home order has led to more people dropping of t-shirts and other materials for memory quilts.

 

 

Picture courtesy of Annie's Quilt and Lodge website

Door County crime expected to remain low during shelter-in-place period

Local law enforcement thinks that Door County’s seasonality could help it avoid spikes in theft being seen in other parts of the country. Non-essential businesses become a juicy target for burglary the longer they remain shuttered. Chief Deputy Pat McCarty from the Door County Sheriff’s Department says that a large number of area businesses already close during the offseason. Hence, things are closer to normal here, even if they aren’t quite normal.

 


Governor Evers’ “Safer at Home” order runs until at least May 26th.

 

Door 2 Door upgrades fleet

Riders of the Door 2 Door taxi service might still pick up a whiff of that new car smell. Four vehicles have been replaced since the beginning of the year, a considerable investment for a fleet that can age quickly. Door County Transportation Manager Pam Busch says it is not unusual for one of the taxis to put on 40,000 miles in a year. Busch says there are some new features that customers are appreciating.

 


Busch acknowledges that rides are down during the coronavirus pandemic, but that is a good thing in that it allows for Door 2 Door to adhere to new protocols that help keep riders safe.

 

COVID-19 Food Safety Series: Protecting your carry-out orders

While many restaurants are closed, some are open for take-out or delivery. Is carry-out food safe? Yes, take-out food appears to be safe. There is no evidence that you can get the COVID-19 from take-out food. We don’t have any evidence that you can get sick if someone who is ill contaminates the food they are preparing for you or contaminates a food package.  But we all want to be extra safe just now, so there are some extra precautions that you can take for take-out food: 

 

· Order from a reputable business that is more likely to provide sick leave and have a strong wellness policy;

 

· If the food needs to be cooked or reheated, cook to proper temperatures (the virus that causes COVID-19 appears to be killed by standard cooking or reheating temperatures); and

 

· Most importantly, wash your hands after handling any food package material and before preparing food or eating.

Sturgeon Bay committee meeting restarting

The public is still invited to participate in City of Sturgeon Bay Common Council meetings. Administrator Josh Van Lieshout says a call or email to your alderman is preferable given the current coronavirus restrictions. Still, residents do retain the right to provide public comments from council chambers during sessions. The city is using Zoom to conduct the meetings remotely, and they can be watched on cable or viewed through the City's video website (link shown below). Van Lieshout says the city continues to deliver needed services, and the council is quietly moving towards normal operations.

 


The next council meeting is Tuesday, April 21st.

 

 https://sbtv.viebit.com

 

Highway departments cautiously start spring work

Door County Highway Department employees are preparing to take on spring work with health protocols in place.  The department has handled road work on an emergency basis for the first two-and-a-half weeks of the “Safer at Home” order.  This week, highway department employees were recalled to work.  Highway Commissioner John Kolodziej says that includes transitioning from winter to spring work while ensuring workers are protected.

 

 

 

Kolodziej says some construction work is scheduled for next week. At the same time, Kewaunee County Road Commissioner Todd Every says, via email:  “At this time, we do not have a lot of work (requiring a larger crew of workers) going out on the highways.  We are working on projects around our facilities, getting equipment ready for summer construction projects, and normal spring maintenance while attempting to "Social Distance" as much as possible.” 

Violence Intervention Project seeking donations

Kewaunee County’s Violence Intervention Project remains open through many avenues, both digital, and in the case of emergencies, physical locations. In order to provide essential services, VIP is asking for donations of a range of goods from face masks to the usual requests like laundry soap, toothpaste, and bleach. Advocate Jill says in-kind donations cannot be taken, but you can place orders at the Piggly Wiggly in Kewaunee, Denny’s Supervalu of Algoma, and Luxemburg’s Stodola’s IGA.

 


Let the grocery store know the donation is meant for the Violence Intervention Project, and they will work to schedule a pick-up with the organization.

 

CTA of the Year award will be handed out this fall

Destination Door County has frequently used the Annual Tourism Week in early May to announce the winner of their Certified Tourism Ambassador of the Year Award, but not this year. The presentation typically happens at a large breakfast, attended by over 150 people, which has been canceled due to the coronavirus. Director of Communications Jon Jarosh says October’s annual meeting is the expected make-up date for the ceremony.

 


Destination Door County says it is ready to roll out the red carpet to visitors when the “Safer at Home” order lifts. For now, the organization encourages people to postpone their planned trips, rather than cancel them entirely.

 

Spending your stimulus check

Many credit union customers began getting stimulus checks on Monday, assuming they filed their taxes using direct deposit. Money Management Counselors Director Leslie Boden says that it is vital to make the hard choice with the extra funds. She suggests that you avoid the urge to splurge.

 


Single filers who earn up to $75,000 and households making less than $150,000 are eligible for a $1,200 check per adult and $500 for any dependent children.

 

Families can still make "window visits" at nursing facilities

Window visits are still allowed at nursing homes and assisted care facilities in the state of Wisconsin.  After an initial recommendation was issued Monday by the Wisconsin Board of Aging and Long Term Care against window visits, the guidance issued was then rescinded shortly after since it conflicted with the “Safer at Home” order.  Window visits became popular after guests were banned from entering the facilities in order to protect residents who are the most vulnerable to the coronavirus.  Tama Bagley, owner of Anna’s Healthcare in Sturgeon Bay said earlier this month that local families have been using window visits frequently.  She shares other ways families are connecting with physical restrictions in place. 

 

 

Bagley encourages people to stay home and safe as much as possible.  Anna’s Healthcare currently cares for over 50 residents.      

Local organization worries about children's opportunities

The Door County Master Gardeners have been told by the UW-Extension Office in Madison to avoid making any volunteering plans this summer. Member Sue Kunz says the uncertainty could rob the area of valuable learning experiences, especially local students.

 


Kunz is concerned about whether community gardens will be allowed this summer. New research suggests that warm, humid conditions and sunshine are effective in destroying the coronavirus, but it also warns that the pandemic could continue through July and August.

 

Libraries popular with virtual checkouts

The Door Public Library's eight locations and the Algoma Public Library are closed until further notice, however, they remain as popular as ever through downloads on their websites.  Library patrons are checking out more books, audiobooks and DVD titles through online links to Hoopla Digital, Libby Overdrive-Wisconsin's Digital Library and other services. Morgan Mann, with Door Public Library, says even with so many options a few fiction titles are very popular.

 

 

 

Mann says various non-fiction works are also drawing a lot of interest.

 

 

 

In order to access these titles, you will need a library card.  You can apply for one online at  doorcountylibrary.org or at algomapubliclibrary.org.

Historical re-enactment pushed into the future

Fish Creek Park hosts civil war re-enactors every two to three years, but that cycle is going to be broke later this summer. Director Laurie Buske says the boys from Company E have informed the Gibraltar Historical Association that they will camp next year due to the coronavirus. 

 


The experience is designed to show the public what it was like during the 19th-century conflict, complete with military drills and authentic uniforms. Company E last settled down in Fish Creek in 2017.

 

Potawatomi State Park logging set to return in October

Logging of beech and ash trees in Potawatomi State Park will wrap up next month before returning in October. Park Supervisor Erin Brown-Stender says the operation got off to a slow start this winter due to other commitments of the contractor. There is not a quota, per se, but rather specific areas of the park where the trees need to be thinned.

 


The Emerald Ash Borer became a problem at Potawatomi beginning in 2015. It is thought to have been brought in on firewood used by campers. Beech bark disease is caused by both a fungus and a scale insect that feeds on the tree’s sap.

 

Fish fry raises money for Door County Meal Cooperative 

A community effort Friday saw over 800 pounds of whitefish served at four locations in Sturgeon Bay to help feed those in need.  Thanks to donations by Henrikson Fisheries, J & M Fisheries and Sonny’s Italian Kitchen & Pizzeria, the free meals were distributed with donations benefiting the Door County Meals Cooperative. One of the locations Friday was at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church.  Pastor James Gomez explains why his church participated in Friday’s fundraiser.

 

 

Fish fry pickup locations on Friday included St. Joseph’s and Corpus Christi Catholic parishes in Sturgeon Bay, as well as Sonny’s. The Door County Meals Cooperative provides meals to people struggling to make ends meet during the COVID-19 health crisis. The Cooperative is currently distributing 800 dinners a day to children and adults that are being produced by the Boys and Girls Club.  If you missed an opportunity to support the fish fry, you can find information on making donations below.

 

Door County Meals Cooperative donations click here

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gallagher supports phased-in reopening plan

U.S. Rep. Mike Gallagher hopes Governor Tony Evers reconsiders his plan to extend the state’s Safer at Home order until May 26th. Shortly after Governor Evers made his announcement, President Donald Trump announced his three-phase approach to reopening the country as it continues to handle the COVID-19 pandemic. At the governors’ discretion, President Trump’s plan would slowly allow large venues like restaurants and churches to reach their capacity, non-essential travel to resume, and public interactions to begin provided the states reach certain benchmarks. Rep. Gallagher calls it a common sense, bottom-up approach.

He encourages Governor Evers to create a bipartisan task force with leaders in Wisconsin to develop a plan to reopen the state slowly and safely, not just follow the path of other governors in the region. Rep. Gallagher also pointed out that without an increase in testing, it will be tough to track down where and how the disease is spreading. After contacting her offices Friday, we hope to share Senator Tammy Baldwin’s thoughts about the country’s COVID-19 response next week.

 

 

Picture taken at a previously held event

Committee getting dairy to families

The Kewaunee County Dairy Promotion Committee is making sure the hard work of farmers gets into the hands of local community members. For students in the lunch programs at Kewaunee, Luxemburg-Casco, and Algoma School Districts, the committee is donating 3000 tubes of yogurt and sticks of string cheese to be distributed in addition to coupons for free milk and butter. Those shopping at Kewaunee County grocery stores will also receive savings on dairy products during the next two months. Kewaunee County Dairy Promotion Committee President JJ Pagel says even as farmers struggle with low milk prices, the organization knows some families have it much worse.

The Kewaunee County Dairy Promotion Committee announced on Friday it has canceled its signature Father’s Day event, Breakfast on the Farm. The host farm, Salentine Homestead Dairy, will have the honors of welcoming thousands to their operation in 2022. Augustian Farms will host the annual event in 2021.

Social distancing recommended for anglers

Milder weather conditions are expected to draw more anglers to lakes and rivers around Door and Kewaunee Counties.  Social distancing, however, is still being recommended whether fishing from shore or on the waves.  Sturgeon Bay Director of Public Works Mike Barker says signs have been posted at city boat launches to remind people to have fun and give each other some space.

 

 

 

Barker says as equally important as social distancing while boating is making sure each angler has a life vest or other personal floatation device because water temperatures are still frigid.

Schools wrestle with closure details

With the school buildings closed until the end of the year, it is decision time for area superintendents on how to proceed. With the exception to spring break and holidays, the peninsula’s eight school districts have been doing some kind of remote learning since Governor Tony Evers originally closed their buildings on March 18th. Thursday’s order extension gets district administrators like Luxemburg-Casco’s Glenn Schlender thinking about next year. Moving around summer school dates and extending the academic year by a few weeks to offer more review on the front end are on the table. Speaking before Thursday’s announcement, Schlender said how students are graded for the final three months of the school year is also a concern.

Schlender says their decisions will be guided by assessments they are giving their students to see if they have regressed and how well their online instruction is working. He had hoped classrooms would be full again soon so students could have closure and they could have hosted some of their year-end events like prom and graduation.

Donors responding to emergency

The Door County Emergency Response Fund continues to answer the calls of the community in big ways since it was reactivated last month. Since the Door County Community Foundation made an initial contribution of $15,000, it has seen its joint effort with the United Way of Door County grow to over $300,000. Its most recent distributions to Door County Medical Center, Scandia Village, Lakeshore CAP, We Are Hope, and Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeastern Wisconsin are helping to fund not just the medical needs of the community during the COVID-19 pandemic but also the emotional concerns as well. Door County Community Foundation President and CEO Bret Bicoy said earlier this month that even with the generosity already shown, more donations will likely be needed.

With the stimulus checks already in bank accounts in some cases, the Door County Community Foundation is encouraging people to donate at least a portion of it to support those that are struggling.

 

 

Old Quarry project appealed

Developers of a proposed RV village in the old Leathem & Smith Quarry site are hoping to keep their project alive. Earlier this week, Quarry Bluff LLC appealed the Resource Planning Committee’s decision to deny their Conditional Use Permit application to build the over 100-site development located near George Pinney County Park. Prior to the RPC’s denial in February, the project failed to get the blessing of Sevastopol’s town board and plan commission. Last month, developer Mike Parent told DoorCountyDailyNews.com that he believes the RPC erred in its judgment, especially when considering subjective matters such as how the RV park would fit in the surrounding property. A release from the Bay Shore Property Owners Association and Quarry Neighborhood Action Group expressed their disappointment in the appeal, restating their beliefs that the project would decrease property values, pose safety hazards, and have a negative effect on the environment. The appeal process could lead to more hearings with the Sevastopol Town Board, the Board of Adjustment, and RPC in the future.

Three more COVID-19 cases confirmed in Kewaunee County

Kewaunee County has added another three positive tests of COVID-19 to its totals since its public health department announced its first death earlier this week. This raises the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 to eight in the county as of 2 p.m. on Thursday. No further details about the new positive tests were available on the county’s website in accordance with HIPAA laws. Public Health Director Cindy Kinnard stressed earlier this week the importance of handwashing and social distancing to reduce the risk of exposure to COVID-19. We will have more on this story as it becomes available.

Therma-Tron-X families making face shields for hospital

With Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) still in high demand, Therma-Tron-X in Sturgeon Bay teamed up with their employees during their off-hours to make face shield designed to protect medical personnel at Door County Medical Center.  Therma-Tron-X is a heat processing equipment manufacturer.  Amy Barnard, the director of IT, explains the materials that go into making the face shields.

 

 

Therma-Tron-X owner Brad Andrae says the custom-made shields have been well-received.

 

 

Therma-Tron-X sends boxes of 50 shield kits home with employees for assembly.  Barnard reports that, as of this Thursday, 483 shields are at the hospital with another 302 that are waiting to go.  She estimates that there are enough kits at home with TTX employees to hit a total of 1,000 by next Monday. 

 

 

(Photos submitted;  top photo of Chad Andrae family assembling face shields at home)

 

Builders adapting to the times

The state of the housing market was favorable before the coronavirus crisis hit in March.  Area builders now are seeing more interest in home renovation and upgrades.  Jeff Dorner, Sales and Project Manager with Van’s Lumber in Dyckesville, says the volume of sales inquiries has increased considerably.  He says materials and supplies have been in good shape to this point, but that could change.

 

 

Dorner says that the logistics of having only one contractor onsite at a time and keeping proper spacing among workers make the job more difficult.  It is taking longer to complete projects given the restrictions.  

 

"Jump Around Wisconsin" on-air locally this Saturday

The “Jump Around Wisconsin” craze has quite possibly become the most popular Saturday tradition in the state during the pandemic. The song “Jump Around” by the House of Pain, which is played after the third quarter at Badger football games in Camp Randall Stadium, has people jumping around in their neighborhoods. Submitted videos and social media posts are commemorating the event. The Jump Around Wisconsin made its debut two weeks ago. It will continue to air on over 100 radio stations statewide again this Saturday at precisely 3 pm, including the radio stations of DoorCountyDailyNews.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food drive goes virtual

Scouts BSA units like Luxemburg Sportsmans Club Troop 1042 are finding that just like everything else, you might have to go virtual to do a good turn daily. The Bay-Lakes Council BSA’s annual Scouting for Food Drive was postponed until the fall due to COVID-19 concerns. The need for food pantries during these times was not postponed, so units across the council are taking it upon themselves to raise awareness and funds to support them. Troop 1042 Scoutmaster Jason Miller says the boys have really taken to the project even if it is a little different than what they are used to at this time of the year.

While Troop 1042’s mail-in efforts will support the Marv Bins Food Pantry located at Holy Trinity Catholic Church in Casco, other local Bay-Lakes Council units will benefit food pantries in Algoma, Kewaunee, Sturgeon Bay, and Sister Bay.  You can find more information about Troop 1042’s Virtual Scouting for Food Drive, which runs through April 30th, below.

 

Showing frontline depth

Hospitals like Door County Medical Center are showing the importance of everyone playing a crucial role in their battle against COVID-19. Nurses without schools to work at have been manning the Door County Medical Center’s mobile testing lab since it first set up last month. Other nurses and medical professionals have been cross-trained in COVID-19 related procedures just in case employees begin contracting the virus. Even the environmental services team has played a major role in keeping hospital employees and patients safe with quick and thorough cleanings of areas where possible COVID-19 patients have been. Door County Medical Center President and CEO Brian Stephens says it takes everyone working together to have the success they have had over the last month.

Door County Medical Center has also expanded its intensive care unit, increased its training, and added additional testing to help mitigate the effects of COVID-19.

Governor extends "Safer at Home" order until May 26

Door and Kewaunee Counties, along with the rest of the state will remain under the Safer at Home Order until May 26th.  Governor Tony Evers announced the extension of the order Thursday that will keep all schools closed through the remainder of this academic year.  The order will allow some businesses and activities to open back up.  Golf Courses will be allowed to open but clubhouses and pro shops will remain closed.  Non-essential businesses will now be able to do deliveries, mailing, and curbside pickup.  Outside, aesthetic work like lawn care and construction is allowed now if done by one person. Other changes include giving local health officials the authority to close public parks and open spaces if deemed necessary.  You can read the complete news release and the “Safer at Home” Emergency order below.

 

 

Emergency Order Click Here

 

 

 

Gov. Evers Directs DHS to Extend Wisconsin's Safer at Home Order
 

MADISON — Gov. Tony Evers today directed Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) Secretary-designee Andrea Palm to extend the Safer at Home order from April 24, 2020 to 8 a.m. Tuesday, May 26, 2020, or until a superseding order is issued. The order implements some new measures to ensure safety and support the progress we've made in containing COVID-19, but also allows certain activities to start up again. The order is available here

“A few weeks ago, we had a pretty grim outlook for what COVID-19 could mean for our state, but because of the efforts of all of you, Safer at Home is working. That said, we aren't out of the woods just yet,” said Gov. Evers. “As I've said all along, we are going to rely on the science and public health experts to guide us through this challenge. So, as we extend Safer at Home, I need all of you to continue doing the good work you've been doing so we can keep our families, our neighbors, and our communities safe, and get through this storm together.”

“Before we lift Safer at Home, the steps of testing and more robust public health measures must be in place,” explained Secretary-designee Palm. “These steps will help us reduce the risk of a second wave of the virus. If we open up too soon, we risk overwhelming our hospitals and requiring more drastic physical distancing measures again.”

The extension of the Safer at Home order includes a few changes. Some changes allow more businesses and activities to open back up, while other changes help make businesses safer for employees and customers. The changes in this order include: 

Businesses and activities ramping up service and operations:

  • Public libraries: Public libraries may now provide curb-side pick-up of books and other library materials. 
  • Golf Courses: Golf courses may open again, with restrictions including scheduling and paying for tee times online or by phone only. Clubhouses and pro shops must remain closed.
  • Non-essential Businesses: Non-essential businesses will now be able to do more things as Minimum Basic Operations, including deliveries, mailings, and curb-side pick-up. Non-essential businesses must notify workers of whether they are necessary for the Minimum Basic Operations.
  • Arts and Crafts Stores: Arts and craft stores may offer expanded curb-side pick-up of materials necessary to make face masks or other personal protective equipment (PPE). 
  • Aesthetic or Optional Exterior Work: Aesthetic or optional exterior law care or construction is now allowed under the extended order, so long as it can be done by one person.
     

Safe Business Practices:

  • Safe Business Practices for Essential Businesses and Operations: Essential Businesses and Operations must increase cleaning and disinfection practices, ensure that only necessary workers are present, and adopt policies to prevent workers exposed to COVID-19 or symptomatic workers from coming to work.
  • Safe Business Practices for Retailers that Essential Businesses and Operations: Retail stores that remain open to the public as Essential Businesses and Operations must limit the number of people in the store at one time, must provide proper spacing for people waiting to enter, and large stores must offer at least two hours per week of dedicated shopping time for vulnerable populations.
  • Supply Chain: Essential Businesses and Operations that are essential because they supply, manufacture, or distribute goods and services to other Essential Businesses and Operations can only continue operations that are necessary to those businesses they supply. All other operations must continue as Minimum Basic Operations.


 Other changes include:

  • Schools: Public and private K-12 schools will remain closed for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year.
  • Local parks and open space: Local health officials may close public parks and open spaces if it becomes too difficult to ensure social distancing or the areas are being mistreated.
  • Travel: People are strongly encourage to stay close to home, not travel to second homes or cabins, and not to travel out-of-state if it is not necessary. 
  • Tribal Nations: Tribal Nations are sovereign over their territory and can impose their own restrictions. Non-tribal members should be respectful of and avoid non-essential travel to Tribal territory. Local government must coordinate, collaborate, and share information with Tribal Nations.
  • Duration: The changes in this order go into effect on April 24, 2020. The order will remain in effect until 8 a.m. on May 26, 2020.


If you have questions, a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) document is available here for your review.

The public should continue to follow simple steps to avoid exposure to the virus and prevent illness including: 

  • Avoiding social gatherings with people of all ages (including playdates and sleepovers, parties, large family dinners, visitors in your home, non-essential workers in your house);
  • Frequent and thorough hand washing with soap and water; 
  • Covering coughs and sneezes;
  • Avoiding touching one's face; and 
  • Staying home. 

This is a rapidly evolving situation, and we encourage you and the public to frequently monitor the DHS website. We encourage you to follow @DHSWI on FacebookTwitter, or dhs.wi on Instagram. Additional information can be found on the CDC website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sturgeon Bay Schools referendum work to begin 2021

Just because the buildings are empty does not mean Sturgeon Bay School District will get a head start on its referendum projects. By a 1,885 to 953 margin, voters approved the district’s $16.84 million referendum during this month’s election to make building upgrades, program expansions, and close Sunset Elementary School. Nothing is set in stone, but Sturgeon Bay Superintendent Dan Tjernagel says improving Sawyer Elementary School will be the first of the projects worked on during the summer of 2021 so it can house more students later that fall. He believes the referendum was supported as much as it was because of the approach the district took.

Even though the work will not begin this year, Tjernagel says the district will meet with Miron Construction and its architect EUA this week to officially kick off the project.

Senator calls for mail-in election

He will not be on the ballot this fall, but retiring state Senator Dave Hansen would like to see voting for the rest of 2020 done entirely by mail. It was one of the amendments the Democratic senator from Green Bay hoped would have been included in the final coronavirus bill approved by the Legislature and signed into law by Governor Tony Evers this week. Not knowing what the future has in store for the August and November elections, Hansen believes the state should do what it can to protect voters if COVID-19 remains an issue.

The Wisconsin Senate unanimously approved the package Wednesday that eliminates the one-week waiting period for unemployment insurance and allows the state to distribute over $2 billion from the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. Hansen called it a good first step, but would have also liked to see more done for worker’s compensation for frontline workers and investments for small businesses and farms.

Destination Door County readies for return of tourism

Postpone, don't cancel.  Door County's ambassador for visitors is sending that vital message to those who are waiting to return to the peninsula.  Destination Door County is asking visitors to postpone trips to the area temporarily.  CEO and President Jack Moneypenny says that the timing of the month-long "safer at home" order to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, is fortunately during Door County's quiet season.  Moneypenny has a request for both locals and eventual visitors when it comes time to invite tourists back in Door County.

 

 

Moneypenny is asking people to travel when it is safe and to postpone their stays by rescheduling them in the future when Door County tourism is back open for business.  You can listen to Destination Door County CEO and President Jack Moneypenny's entire interview below.

 

 

New DMV restrictions not affecting farms

Farms in Door and Kewaunee counties won't be impacted by new visitor restrictions for the Division of Motor Vehicles Service Centers.  In-person services at those locations are being canceled until further notice.  The only exceptions are for voters who lack the proper identification to cast ballots, those who want a legal Wisconsin identification card and people who want to obtain a commercial driver's license.  Appointments have to be made for those services.  Kristina Boardman, the DMV Administrator, says the agency recognizes the importance of ensuring that local farmers continue to have the ability to obtain CDL's.

 

 

Residents who need to get a duplicate operator's license,  title a vehicle or change their addresses can still do so online at wisconsindmv.gov. 

Jelinek plans transition to mayor in Kewaunee

Jason Jelinek is relishing his time as Kewaunee mayor-elect. After all, it was the World’s Tallest Grandfather Clock that got him started down the road to the city’s top post. In 2013, Jelinek spearheaded efforts to preserve the landmark, and he says more than one person told him during the process that he should run for mayor. Jelinek says he wanted to be elected to the council first, and learn how government works before he set his sights on the top prize.

 


Jelinek expects the beginning of his term to be dominated by the coronavirus and reopening Kewaunee when the time is right.

 

Campgrounds in Door County closed temporarily; COVID-19 Update

Although no new cases of COVID-19 were reported on Wednesday by Door County Public Health, the department announced the temporary closure of all campgrounds within the county until May 15.  The health order was issued as a necessary measure to prevent, suppress, and control communicable diseases.  Public Health Manager Susan Powers told DoorCountyDailyNews.com that the decision was made with the input of many other public officials.  In the news release, Powers says she determined that the immediate temporary closure of all campgrounds in Door County was based on six factors.  Those included a higher percentage of an older population in Door County, a large number of campgrounds can draw thousands of people from inside and outside the county, and that camping encourages non-essential travel into Door County. All seasonal campground site occupants who arrived on or before Wednesday may be allowed to remain in place.  If they leave the campground to return to their place of residence, they are not permitted to come back to their campsite.  You can find the complete news release and the most recent COVID-19 update from Door County Public Health below.    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Health Order: Temporary Closure of All Campgrounds Within Door County
It is the duty of the local health officers to promptly take all measures necessary to
prevent, suppress, and control communicable diseases as set forth in Wis. Stat. §
252.03(1).
In my role as local health officer, I have determined that the immediate temporary
closure of all campgrounds in Door County is reasonable and necessary to prevent,
suppress, and control the COVID-19 virus consistent with Sec. 252.03, Wis. Stats.
Although the Governor’s Evers “Safer at Home” Order (Executive Order #12) lists
campgrounds as essential there are additional factors that are unique to Door County.
This determination is based on the following reasons, including but not limited to:
1. Door County has a large percentage of aged population, and data
demonstrates that the aged population is particularly vulnerable to the
COVID-19 virus.
2. There are a large number of the campgrounds which draw thousands of people
from inside and outside of Door County.
3. Camping in Door County encourages non-essential travel.
4. Camping allows for unmonitored congregating of groups greater than
ten (10) people, which is prohibited under Governor Evers’ “Safer at
Home” Order (Executive Order #12).
5. Camping and related activities reduces the ability to properly social distance,
especially in communal location in campgrounds (e.g. campsites and
bathrooms).
6. The influx of campers to Door County will further tax already limited resources
(e.g., health care system, groceries and other necessities) within Door County.

Seasonal campground site occupants who arrived on or before April 15, 2020 may be allowed
to remain in place. Any seasonal site occupant that leaves the campground to return to his or
her place of residence is not permitted to return to re-occupy the seasonal site. All seasonal site
occupants that arrived on or before April 15, 2020 are encouraged to return to their residences.
This Health Order is effective April 15, 2020 and will remain in effect through
May 15th or so long as Executive Order #12 is in effect, whichever is longer.
We are aware that the Frequently Asked Questions, which accompany
Executive Order #12, lists campgrounds as an “Essential Business”. Governor
Evers has since ordered the DNR to close 40 state parks, forests and
recreational areas and the DNR has closed campgrounds in state parks and
recreation areas through April 30th

. These actions by the State are consistent

with and support the need for this Health Order.
If you have questions or immediate needs related to COVID-19, call 2-1-1 or text COVID-19 to
211-211. For up-to-date information, please frequently monitor the Door County Government
website https://www.co.door.wi.gov/ Door County Public Health Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/doorcountypublichealth/ and the DHS website for updates, and to
follow @DHSWI on Facebook and Twitter, or DHS WI on Instagram. Additional information
can be found on the CDC website.

 

 

 

Door County COVID-19 Update

April 15, 2020 Confirmed Cases

 

Wisconsin

 

Positive: 3,721

Negative: 39,326

Deaths: 182

Door County

 

Tests Performed: 171

Positive: 9

Negative: 151

Death: 1

Tests Pending: 11

 

 

Please note: The Door County numbers reported include only the positive cases reported to Public Health at the time of this report.  COVID-19 statistics are changing rapidly and are not intended to represent real time statistics.

 

Currently there is no evidence of community spread in Door County. 

The positive Door County cases are not concentrated in any one locality, they are scattered throughout the county.

 

Please continue to adhere to the “Safer at Home” guidelines.

We know that COVID 19 is spreading throughout the United States and Wisconsin.

 

Travel to and from Door County is highly discouraged at this time

If you choose to return to Door County, Door County Public Health requests that you self-quarantine for a full 14 days.

 

 

 

 

 

Multitasking for safety

Professional jugglers and members of the Kewaunee County public telecommunications team have more in common than you think. Kewaunee County is one of the last agencies in the state with its telecommunicators serving a dual role of jailer as well. They also have to sort out the details from calls that could range from calm to frantic and be the soothing voice on the other side of the line. Kewaunee County Sheriff Matt Joski says without the telecommunicators' ability to multitask, nothing that happens next would be possible.

Joski says since the pandemic began, their telecommunicators have had to play doctor as well to make sure it was safe for their deputies to respond. You can read the rest of Sheriff Matt Joski’s Public Safety Telecommunications recognition salute online below.

 

FROM SHERIFF JOSKI

With all that is going on around us and the attention being given to so many of those who serve our communities, it is fitting that this week is set aside for us to recognize Public Safety Telecommunicators.    

   

      We seem to always focus on those resources that respond to the scene with the lights and sirens, but all too often forget about the Dispatchers who are the first ones to get the call and many times try to make sense out of frantic voices on the other end of the line. Without the skills of the Public Safety Telecommunicator, none of the subsequent efforts would be possible.

 

        Each Year the second week of April is designated as Public Safety Telecommunications recognition week. While this role in public safety is not as recognized or publicized as a Law Enforcement Officer, Fire Fighter, or Rescue Personnel, it is without a doubt as important as those other professions. The Public Safety Telecommunicator is the first contact in most critical events. Whether it is a motor vehicle accident, a fire, a crime, or even someone locking their keys in their car, the first voice they will hear that will ultimately get them the services they need will be the voice of a Public Safety Telecommunicator.

 

        Most people refer to them as Dispatchers, and while this is one of the key roles they perform, there is much more to this position. Here in Kewaunee County, we have the distinction of being one of the last agencies that “Dual Role” our staff. The official title for this position at the Kewaunee County Sheriff’s Department is Jailer/ Dispatcher. What this means is that our Dispatchers also serve as our Jailers, and our Jailers as our dispatchers. This allows us to meet the state requirement to have two jailers on shift at all times. While there is no requirement to have two dispatchers on at all times, having the flexibility to have a second dispatcher when those critical calls come in is definitely an advantage.

 

         Most of us have heard of “Multi-Tasking” but I don’t think you can truly appreciate that phrase until you see what the typical day is in the life of one of these staff members. Even the most minor of calls will require them to take the initial call, communicate that call to the proper response unit, and furthermore document that call with absolute accuracy all at the same time. When you take this to the level of a multi-agency response to a major event such as a structure fire, their skills are truly put to the test. It is fitting that we take some time to give our appreciation to those who truly are on the front lines of keeping our communities safe.

 

          I want to personally thank all of the men and women who hold these law enforcement positions and I want to reiterate that they do in fact “Serve and Protect with Pride and Integrity” the citizens of Kewaunee County just as any other member of our Law Enforcement family.

Dairy industry works to get through pandemic

Milk cooperatives like Edge are working with government officials to make sure their Wisconsin members get through the COVID-19 pandemic. Edge Dairy Farmer Cooperative, which has members in Door and Kewaunee Counties, is pushing for an upfront, $9 per hundredweight lump sum payment for their milk from the next three months to help provide immediate financial relief to dairy farmers. It would also provide payments for milk losses during the month of April based on March’s production. Brey Cycle Farm co-owner and Edge member Moriah Brey says the package is not just about helping dairy farmers through a tough time.

Brey says the Dairy Farmers of Wisconsin and the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection are working with the Hunger Task Force to process milk for local food banks.

Sheriffs department shares needed sanitizer

The Door County Sheriffs Department is providing other counties with much-needed hand sanitizer from a large stock it previously ordered.  That supply comes from a Wausau area distillery that began producing sanitizer before distillers in Door County began to do the same.  Sheriff Tammy Sternard decided to proceed with the 20-gallon order. So, Chief Deputy Pat McCarty went to pick up the supply on Monday with three of the four five-gallon buckets going to sheriff's offices in Calumet, Manitowoc and Winnebago counties.

 

 

While delivering the hand-sanitizer made for a long workday for McCarty, he says he was glad to bring such much-needed supplies to other departments in need.

COVID-19 bill signed by Governor Evers

UPDATE: Wisconsin Senate overwhelmingly approves the Assembly bill; Governor Tony Evers signed it into law shortly after.

 

In one of the least partisan sessions in recent memory for State Rep. Joel Kitchens, the Wisconsin Assembly nearly unanimously approved its bill aimed at COVID-19-related relief.  The bill will allow the state to tap the entire $2 billion earmarked for Wisconsin from the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. It eliminates the one-week waiting period for unemployment insurance, requires the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation to develop a plan to assist state industries like tourism, agriculture, and manufacturing, and sets aside an extra $75 million to address other unexpected needs. Kitchens says it is the response the public needed to see.

One provision taken out from the original bill would have allowed the Joint Finance Committee to make cuts to certain parts of the budget while the state’s projected surplus begins to dry up due to declining tax revenues. Kitchens admits that could lead to steeper cuts down the road.

 

 

 

Door County behind in 2020 census response

The self-count for the 2020 census in Door County is currently lagging considerably compared to the state average. As of last Thursday, 54.2 percent statewide have responded, while only 32.6 percent have in Door County. Dan Powers, a member of the Door County 2020 Census Complete Count Committee, explains why people should complete the U.S. Census information right now.

 

 

 If you have not received a Census ID, or lost it, you can log on to my2020census.gov or call a toll free number. Powers estimates the state loses $2,000 in money that would otherwise come back to them for every person not counted. You can find the recent response rate of communities in Door County and completion information for the 2020 Census below.

 

 

 

 

April 9, 2020 % Self Response 

 

Wisconsin 54.2

 

Door County 32.6

 

 

Baileys Harbor 18.0

 

Brussels 57.0

 

Clay Banks 40.8

 

Egg Harbor 10.3

 

Egg Harbor Village 20.0

 

Ephraim 03.5

 

Forestville 54.1

 

Forestville Village 51.9

 

Gardner 25.4

 

Gibraltar 15.8

 

Jacksonport 25.3

 

Liberty Grove 20.3

 

Nasewaupee 40.6

 

Sevastopol 45.7

 

Sister Bay 16.0

 

Sturgeon Bay City 55.4

 

Sturgeon Bay Town 33.3

 

Union 38.9

 

Washington 21.3 

 

 

ONLINE:    Preferred method: my2020census.gov  If you did not receive a Census ID, or have lost it, select the link: “If you do not have a Census ID, click here” when you get to the Login Button.

 

PHONE:    1-844-330-2020 to complete the form   

Coping skills can help prevent panic -- Mental Health Minute

Taking personal responsibility for your behavior is essential during the time of a health crisis, according to a Sturgeon Bay Psychologist.  Dr. Dennis White encourages you to keep yourself as safe as you can and not putting others at unnecessary risk while reaching out to help others during this time.  He says coping from the fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic is challenging, but you can control how you react to it.

 

 

Dr. White notes that the new reality has strained just about every aspect of our society.  You can listen to Dr. White’s entire Mental Health Minute on overcoming feelings of anxiety and frantic agitation with this story below.

 

 

 

Gibraltar doing remote learning rest of school year

The Gibraltar schools will not be going back in session even if the state order is lifted after April 24. The Gibraltar School District Board of Education decided Monday night to continue remote school learning and cancel extracurricular activities for the rest of the year. Gibraltar Area School Superintendent Tina Van Meer says the difficult decision was made out of the safety for all concerned.

 

 

 

Van Meer adds that with the remote and online learning option, many parents may have chosen for their children not to return to school, making the transition difficult.  Gibraltar schools initiated E-learning possibilities last year when school was postponed due to long stretches of bad weather. Van Meer says her teachers are currently doing a fantastic job utilizing technologies like ZOOM and Google Hangouts to stay connected with their students virtually.

Luxemburg business icon passes away from COVID-19-related complications

The village of Luxemburg has lost an iconic community member. The Kewaunee County man who died Monday from COVID-19-related complications was long-time business leader Jerry Simonar from Luxemburg.  DoorCountyDailyNews.com confirmed with Jerry’s son, Dale Simonar, the news of his passing. The 87-year-old Simonar, a Korean War veteran, was to participate in the upcoming Honor Flight Return to Korea trip.   Those travel plans were canceled back in late February due to the pandemic.  Over a year ago, Simonar received recognition for his lifelong business development in the village.  Luxemburg Area Chamber of Commerce president Alex Stodola says bestowing Jerry with the 2018 Person of the Year award was long overdue at the time and a great honor. He shares what Simonar meant to the community.

 

 

Simonar, known affectionately as “the Mayor of south Luxemburg”, started the Simonar Sports business that sells ATVs and snowmobiles back in 1962 with his late brothers Leroy and Richard.  As recently as last month, Jerry was the man behind the counter at Simonar Service, which is a fourth-generation business that started in 1928.  The staff at DoorCountyDailyNews.com wishes to extend condolences to the Simonar family at this difficult time. 

Firefighters wearing more hats than usual

Volunteer firefighters already do more than just protect the community from blazes, but members at departments across Door County have been doing much more than even that in recent weeks. The COVID-19 pandemic has put volunteer firefighters into several volunteer roles such as dropping off groceries and assisting in absentee voting. Over the weekend the Brussels-Union-Gardner Fire Department even hosted an impromptu parade for three-year-old Levi, who because of the Safer at Home order had to have a birthday party without many of his family and friends. BUG Fire Chief Curt Vandertie says it has been gratifying for his department to have such a positive impact in the community in so many different ways.

The Door County Fire Chiefs Association has mobilized hundreds of volunteers across the county to help residents with non-emergency needs such as delivering food and medication, answering general questions, and providing emotional support.

 

 

COVID testing not a perfect science

Door County health officials said Monday while testing availability is improving locally, it is still a work in progress. Door County Medical Center Chief Medical Officer Dr. Jim Heise and Door County Public Health Manager Sue Powers addressed testing at length during their fifth Facebook Live forum Monday night. Testing for COVID-19 has changed from week to week, first focusing on those who had traveled overseas to those now showing multiple symptoms. Heise says testing people who may be asymptomatic may not make sense right now, but that could change.

Rapid testing, which can give results for COVID-19 in as little as five minutes, is available at area hospitals but Heise says it is primarily being used in very specific situations. As for immunity testing, Heise says they are working with their partners in Green Bay to make sure it gives them the information they need.

 

 

Kewaunee County reports first COVID-19 related death

A Kewaunee County resident recently diagnosed with COVID-19 has died. Kewaunee County Public Health Department officials said in a press release Tuesday that the patient passed away on Monday. People in close contact with the person have been asked to be self-quarantine for 14 days as a precaution after the test for COVID-19 came back positive. Public Health Director Cindy Kinnard added in the release that “this is a very scary virus” and it is not just tough to watch the number of cases increase, but to report a death as well. As of Tuesday, Kewaunee County has had 111 residents tested for COVID-19 with five positive cases, 78 negative results, and 28 tests still pending. The staff at DoorCountyDailyNews.com joins the Kewaunee County Public Health Department in offering their condolences to the family and friends of the patient at this time.

 

STATEMENT FROM KEWAUNEE COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH DIRECTOR CINDY KINNARD

“This is a very scary virus. Not only is it tough to watch the number of positive COVID19 cases increase, but to report news of a death is just devastating. Our condolences go out to the family during this difficult time. We cannot stress enough the importance of handwashing and social distancing to reduce the risk of exposure to COVID-19.” 

Water rescue call false alarm

Rescue crews in northern Door County could breathe a sigh of relief after an empty vessel ended up being just that on Monday. The Sister Bay/Liberty Grove Fire Department, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Door County Emergency Services, the United States Coast Guard, and the Door County Sheriff’s Department responded to a call of an overturned kayak just after 12:30 p.m. just north of downtown Sister Bay. It was determined that the kayak was not being used, but rather became loose from a nearby dock and was pushed around by the area’s big waves and high winds. Sister Bay/Liberty Grove Fire Chief Chris Hecht says what could have been a horrible incident became a teaching moment for people as boating season approaches.

Hecht also recommends small watercraft owners to take advantage of the free vessel identification program from the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary. The stickers (pictured) allow you to write your name and two phone numbers to contact for when your vessel is found.

Door County election results

The release of the spring primary election results in Door County after nearly one week from in-person voting saw a lot of close races.  Roy Englebert defeated Lora Jorgensen in District 3 for the Door County Board of Supervisors that serves Clay Banks, the village of Forestville and part of the town of Forestville. Englebert, who received 230 votes to Jorgensen’s 167, had won a recall election over Jorgenson last fall.   In other contested seats, District 4 for towns of Gardner and Nasewaupee saw Kara Counard narrowly defeat Jon Koch 215-198.  Erin Tauscher defeated Helen Bacon 184-131 for District 7 in Sturgeon Bay.  While in District 9 in Sturgeon Bay Laura Vlies Wotachek won over Dan Williams 279-211.  The closest race of the night was in District 16, the town of Egg Harbor was decided by a single vote.  Elizabeth Grace Gauger beat Randy Halstead 239-238. You can find the complete results including town supervisors and the Sturgeon Bay School District referendum that passed with the below link.   

 

Door County election results

 

CONTESTED RACES

County Supervisor District 3
Roy H. Englebert 230 57.93% 

Lora Jorgensen 167 42.07%

 

County Supervisor District 4

Jon Koch 198 47.83% 

Kara Counard 215 51.93%

 

County Supervisor District 7

Erin Tauscher 184 58.41% 

Helen L. Bacon 131 41.59%

 

County Supervisor District 9

Laura Vlies Wotachek 279 56.94% 

Dan Williams 211 43.06%

 

County Supervisor District 16

Elizabeth Grace Gauger 239 50.00%

Randy Halstead 238 49.79%

 

Gardner Town Supervisor

Michele Ploor 162 43.20% 

Kevin Fleischman 212 56.53% 

 

Liberty Grove Supervisor (Vote for 2)

Louis J. Covotsos 473 32.40% 

Janet Johnson 622 42.60% 

Matt Stone 358 24.52%

 

Sevastopol Town Supervisor (Vote for 2)

Darrick DeMeuse 262 14.79% 

Jeanne Vogel 530 29.91% 

Robert Gamble 395 22.29% 

Derek Wayne Denil 578 32.62% 

 

Village of Sister Bay Trustee (Vote for 3)

Patrick Duffy 227 20.71% 

Laura Wilker 175 15.97% 

Rob Zoschke 189 17.24% 

Vivian Nienow 208 18.98% 

Denise L. Bhirdo 296 27.01%

 

Southern Door School Board Member (Vote for 4)

Christopher D. Jackson 1,147 17.07% 

Marissa Norton 1,480 22.03% 

Janel Veeser 1,259 18.74% 

Kim M. Starr 1,353 20.14% 

Pamela A. Parks 1,443 21.48% 

 

Washington Island School Board Member

Sara Sorensen 249 59.57% 

Kevin Krueger 169 40.43%

 

Town of Forestville Referenda

Yes 239 64.77% 

No 130 35.23%

 

Sturgeon Bay School District Referenda

Yes 1,885 66.42% 

No 953 33.58%

 

 

Kewaunee County election results

Five contested supervisor seats were decided on Monday evening in Kewaunee County.  For the County supervisor position in District 6, incumbent Daniel A. Olson won by a vote of 144-79 over Donna Thomas for the village of Luxemburg.  Timothy Kinnard prevailed over Lisa Cochart 179-121 in District 7, the town and village of Casco.  District 8 saw incumbent Douglas R. Doell defeat Frank Madzarevic 177-59.  District 10 had challenger Jack Wochos defeat incumbent Tom Cretney 200-95. District 12 was a very close race that was decided by just four votes.  Milt Swagel won over incumbent Mary Ellen Dobbins by a 130-126 count. You can see the complete Kewaunee County results by clicking on the link below. 

 

 

Complete Kewaunee County results

 

CONTESTED RACES

 

County Supervisor District 6 - Vote for 1
Donna Thomas  79
Daniel A. Olson 144

 

County Supervisor District 7 - Vote for 1

Timothy J Kinnard  179

Lisa Cochart  121

 

County Supervisor District 8 - Vote for 1

Frank Madzarevic  59

Douglas R. Doell 177

 

County Supervisor District 10 - Vote for 1

Tom Cretney 95

Jack Wochos 200

 

County Supervisor District 12 - Vote for 1

Mary Dobbins 126

Milt Swagel 130

 

Village of Casco Trustee - Vote for 2

Timothy J. Kinnard  122

Francis Gilson 109

Chad Cochart 82

 

 

Kewaunee County up to four COVID-19 cases

Kewaunee County Public Health announced Monday afternoon that another person tested positive for the coronavirus making the total four.  The first confirmed case in Kewaunee County was just over a week ago, with two more people testing positive over the weekend.  As of 2 pm Monday, 120 people have been tested in Kewaunee County with 78 negative and 28 that are still pending.  No other details are being released at this time.  Public health officials are asking people to follow the Safer at Home order and practicing social distancing. 

Door County COVID-19 Update numbers; one death

After announcing the first death associated with the COVID-19 in Door County on Monday, public health officials released updated information.  There is no evidence of community spread in Door County and the confirmed cases remain at nine people.  The positive cases in Door County are not concentrated in any one locality and are scattered throughout the county.   There have been 159 tests performed with a total of 143 negative results and only seven tests pending.  That is down from 53 pending cases last Friday.  Door County Public Health is highly discouraging travel to and from Door County and requesting people to quarantine for a full 14 days if you choose to return.  The man who passed away on Monday was in his 70’s and was hospitalized while suffering from other underlying medical conditions.  No other details will be disclosed due to privacy laws.

Preparing for a pandemic

The preparation for the COVID-19 pandemic began at Door County Medical Center long before the area reported its first case on March 30th. Logistics manager Andrew Starr says Door County Medical Center began planning ahead with its personal protective equipment (PPE) purchases back at the beginning of February when the Centers for Disease Control reported its first COVID-19 case. Outside of the demand from hospitals across the country, Starr says the location of where much of the PPE is produced is adding to the shortage.

The Wisconsin Hospital Association shows that at least three of the ten hospitals in northeast Wisconsin have less than a week’s supply of goggles and paper medical masks. Door County Medical Center put out the call last week for volunteers to produce cloth face masks as a precaution for COVID-19.

Milk glut leaves farmers with little options

Dairy farmers in Door and Kewaunee Counties have plenty of milk to give, but the places to take it to maybe drying up. Closed schools and restaurants operating under restrictions are partly to blame for the increased supply of milk and other dairy products, causing processors to fill up and prices to tumble down. Officials from the cooperative Dairy Farmers of America admitted in a Wall Street Journal story last week that as much as seven percent of the milk produced at the beginning of April was dumped. Spreading milk onto fields as a nutrient was the subject of a UW-Extension webinar last week, but Kewaunee County Agriculture Agent Aerica Bjurstrom encourages farmers to consider other options first.

Bjurstrom says land spreading with milk would require updates to your nutrient management plan and cause consequences such as increased pests and bad odors. 

First COVID-19 death reported in Door County

Less than two weeks after it reported its first case of COVID-19, Door County is now mourning its first death. In a release from the Door County Public Health Department Monday morning, the person was a hospitalized male in his 70s. In addition to contracting the virus, he also suffered from other underlying medical conditions. Door County Public Health Manager Sue Powers passed on her condolences to the family and friends of the individual while also using it as a reminder of the importance of the Safer at Home order. No other details will be disclosed due to privacy laws. Door County has reported nine positive COVID-19 cases since March 30th.

 

RELEASE FROM DOOR COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH

 

Door County Mourns First COVID-19 Related Death 
Sturgeon Bay, WI (April 13, 2020) – Door County Public Health is saddened to report the county’s first death associated with COVID-19. The individual was a hospitalized male in his 70’s with multiple underlying medical conditions.  Due to privacy laws, no further information will be disclosed. 


Our hearts go out to the family and friends of the individual who has passed. This tragic loss is a reminder of how important the Safer at Home order is in the protection of our most vulnerable residents. 


Door County  Public Health  continues to work closely with local partners and healthcare systems to fight the transmission of the virus. The Safer at Home order issued by Gov. Evers is a critical piece in protecting our community, friends, family and neighbors. 


We must all stay home, maintain distance from others, end unnecessary shopping trips and avoid gatherings.  The actions we take now can significantly reduce the spread of COVID-19. 

Dahl pens pandemic tune

While some people put their names in for flights out of the country before COVID-19 reached full pandemic stage, Door County musician Katie Dahl put pen to paper. The end result was “I Already Knew,” a song of reflection from being in quarantine after returning from a canceled slate of shows in Europe. Dahl says the constantly changing world around her since the Safer at Home order came down close to a month ago has been a source of inspiration.

The one thing Dahl has missed throughout all of this has been performing for live audiences. What she called the “musician’s great equalizer,” her outlet now is her weekly “Live from Home” shows on Facebook every Sunday at 2 p.m.

 

 

State attempts to stamp out unemployment insurance fraud

The State of Wisconsin’s Department of Workforce Development is facing the tough task of sorting through an unprecedented number of unemployment insurance claims in search of fraud. In addition to the training of new hires along with repurposed public employees from other agencies, DWD must also adjust to new guidance from the federal government related to the recently passed stimulus package. Emily Savard says most fraud detection techniques involve some form of cross-matching where records from multiple computer databases are compared.

 


Unemployment insurance claims statewide have come down slightly from the record pace at the beginning of the month, but are still running about 15 times the number of applications this week last year.

 

*Photo of Sturgeon Bay Job Center.

 

Grants boost Door County internet access

Internet access in Door County will get some much-needed upgrades thanks to grants to improve broadband service.  The Wisconsin Public Service Commission awarded several internet service providers a total of nearly $303,000.  That includes Door County Broadband which is getting $65,282 to build one new broadband tower in the Town of Nasewaupee. The new tower and an existing structure will have fixed wireless antennas and reach 50 businesses and 1,008 residential locations within the service area.  Kevin Voss, President and CEO of Door County Broadband, says that will bring much-needed access to full-time residents and visitors, especially those in the health care community with part-time homes in the area.

 

 

 A grant of $188,044 will go to Charter Communications to build a cable internet service along South Lake Michigan Drive, in the Town of Sturgeon Bay.  Nsight Telservices is getting $48,960 to connect existing fiber service to Mesh Wi-Fi equipment on poles in the downtown area of Egg Harbor. This will enable the Village of Egg Harbor to provide free Wi-Fi service to the public.

Door County pulling out all the stops to reduce deer population

The Door County Deer Advisory Council hopes to give hunters every opportunity possible to bag a deer this fall, and even into the winter. The group met via teleconference Monday night, recommending several additional hunts to help cull a swelling herd. Dick Baudhuin says everything is on the table to ensure a big haul. 

 


In addition to the extended bowhunting season, there will also be a holiday hunt. Baudhuin says the goal is to harvest 4,000 antlerless deer. Bonus permits will be available, and each hunting license will include five antlerless permits free of charge. Those permits are transferrable for rifle season, but not for archery. The recommendations are now subject to public review before the next meeting on May 4th at 7 PM.

 

Two new Kewaunee County coronavirus cases reported

The Kewaunee County Public Health Department announced two new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday afternoon.  The total number of confirmed cases has risen to three. No additional details have been given in keeping with privacy requirements. Once an infection is established, the person who tests positive begins 14 days of confinement, and public health officials work to determine who else may have had prolonged exposure to the sick person. Door County has seen nine total cases, the most recent one was announced late Friday.

Police say they're available for welfare checks

Three welfare checks were requested this past Tuesday afternoon across Door County in less than one hour, but the Door County Sheriff’s Department says it doesn’t mind responding if that eases concerns. Deputy Chief Pat McCarty says in these particular cases, each call was routed through a separate agency. 

 


McCarty says that, overall, calls are down slightly compared to a typical early spring period. That allows the department to perform lower priority calls like welfare checks without straining its resources too much.

 

History books big online sellers for shut-ins

People staying “Safer at Home” are keeping Novel Bay Booksellers of Sturgeon Bay going through online sales, especially since the store is closed.  Shut-ins are also spending their time looking into past challenges to help with present circumstances.  Liz Welter, co-owner of Novel Bay Booksellers, says the best selling book through her website is “The Splendid and The Vile” by Erik Larson, which profiles Winston Churchill and his efforts to rally British citizens during World War II.

 

 

 

Welter also says children and teen books are selling well online.  She says Novel Bay Booksellers set up its website just before the “Safer at Home” order was given for non-essential businesses, like hers, to close until further notice. 

Sturgeon Bay altering summer calendar

The City of Sturgeon Bay is canceling summer activities as far out as June and July, including the “Kickoff to Summer” event. Municipal Services Director Mike Barker says a post on Facebook details all of the planning that has to begin now to make sure the petting zoo, face painting, and paddleboards are available at Sunset Park when the public stops by to have fun. The June farmers’ market has been moved into July, and the group trip to Miller Park to attend a Brewers game has been called off among other changes, says Barker.

 


The Facebook post is below. 

 

 

Ephraim makes last-minute changes to streetscape project

The Village of Ephraim’s board met Wednesday via teleconference to address an objection to the German Road storm drain construction set to begin next week. The goal of the project is to create a sewer that would collect runoff from German Road properties that is currently pooling in the Water Street Gallery parking lot. Owner Fred Bridenhagen fears that the creation of an easement on his lot would reduce its value. The board was unable to resolve its issue with Bridenhagen. Still, it passed a measure proposed by Trustee Paul Ruppold to lower the water main pipe to the proper elevation so that a potential sewer drain could be connected if Bridenhagen and the village come to an agreement.

 


Without the amendment, Ephraim was going to be forced to issue a costly stop-work order to the firm contracted to install the stormwater drain.

 

League of Women Voters worried about disenfranchisement

The Door County League of Women Voters is concerned Tuesday’s election was the wrong course of action. Shirley Senerighi says that voters should never be forced to choose between their health and their constitutional rights.

 


Senerighi was able to vote absentee and was not aware of any issues locally concerning long lines, as seen in larger metro areas in Wisconsin. She was grateful that all three branches of state government and the federal courts were able to weigh in on the election but remains disappointed that voting was not pushed back like in other states across the country. The full election results will be available this Monday.

 

Master Gardeners able to finish 2020 coursework

This year’s crop of Master Gardener students has grown their skills even in the face of abrupt changes due to the Safer at Home policy. Volunteer Sue Kunz says that the first nine weeks of class were held as normal. The 10th week is usually a take-home exam, and students were able to pick up the test directly from Kunz’s home. The remaining classes wrapped up online using Zoom. Kunz says it’s the volunteer aspect of being a Master Gardener student that looks to be disrupted the most.

 


The Master Gardeners have already canceled next month’s plant sale.

 

Libraries promote digital options

As the “Safer at Home” guidelines stretch into their third week, many bookworms have blown through their to-read list. Area libraries want patrons to know that there are electronic options for those who can’t wait to browse the stacks for a new offering. Assistant Librarian Morgan Mann highlights what’s available through the Door County Library.

 


The Algoma and Kewaunee Public Libraries touted their partnership with InfoSoup earlier this month. 

 

COVID-19 Food Safety Series: Protecting your food

There are many questions people have about their food as we live in a COVID-19 world. 

 

What do we know about food safety and COVID-19? 

COVID-19 is caused by one of a family of coronaviruses. COVID-19 is a respiratory illness. The primary route of infection is through air-borne virus particles from the droplets of a sneeze or cough of an infected individual. If you breathe in virus-containing droplets of mucus or saliva from a cough or sneeze, the viruses can multiply in your respiratory tract and make you sick. About 15-30% of common colds every year are caused by a type of coronaviruses. COVID-19 is a particularly virulent and contagious coronavirus.  The last major coronavirus epidemic was in 2002 when SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) caused 800 deaths worldwide. COVID-19 is being referred to as SARS-COV-2. 

 

Is COVID-19 going to make us sick through the food that we eat?

There is no evidence that COVID-19 is a foodborne illness. The way that we get the COVID-19 illness is primarily from breathing in infected droplets from someone coughing or sneezing.  Another way that we may get sick is from contact transmission. Contact transmission is touching a contaminated surface and transferring live virus particles to the mucus membranes in our nose, mouth or eyes.  We transfer the virus by touching our mouth, nose or eyes. There isn’t any evidence that you can get COVID-19 from food.

 

How is COVID-19 different from something like Salmonella?

Salmonellosis, the illness from Salmonella, is caused by a bacteria not a virus. When we get sick from Salmonella, we have eaten a food with Salmonella bacteria in it. The Salmonella bacteria survive being destroyed by the acid in our stomach and end up in our gut, our small intestine. In the warm environment of our small intestine, the Salmonella bacteria start growing and make us sick. A foodborne illness is a gastrointestinal illness, not a respiratory illness. Some people say that a foodborne illness gives them flu-like symptoms, but that is incorrect, the flu is a respiratory illness, not an illness in your gastrointestinal tract.

Even though there isn’t any evidence that food can make you sick, people are still worried. Yes, there are a lot of questions about COVID-19 and food that we might buy or prepare for our family.

 

While many restaurants are closed, some are open for take-out or delivery. Is carry-out food safe?

Yes, take-out food appears to be safe. There is no evidence that you can get the COVID-19 from take-out food. We don’t have any evidence that you can get sick if someone who is ill contaminates the food they are preparing for you or contaminates a food package.  But we all want to be extra safe just now, so there are some extra precautions that you can take for take-out food: 

· Order from a reputable business that is more likely to provide sick leave and have a strong wellness policy;

· If the food needs to be cooked or reheated, cook to proper temperatures (the virus that causes COVID-19 appears to be killed by standard cooking or reheating temperatures); and

· Most importantly, wash your hands after handling any food package material and before preparing food or eating.

What about grocery store items? Do we need to let packaged food like cans of soup or boxes of cereal sit in the car for 24 hours before bringing it into my kitchen?

No. Information is circulating that the COVID-19 virus can survive on surfaces for perhaps several days.  But there is no clear evidence that we can get sick from contact transmission of the virus; touching an unclean surface and then getting sick from that. 

For grocery store items, hand washing is the best approach. Wash hands before, and after, handling any food packages.  When you bring home packaged food, wash your hands before putting packages away. After picking a can or package of food from your pantry or refrigerator, wash your hands before preparing the product and always wash your hands before eating. Social distancing and washing hands (often) are the way to keep from becoming ill with COVID-19.

 

What about fresh produce?

That seems different, do we continue to eat fresh fruits and vegetables? Yes. There is no reason to assume that fresh fruits and vegetables are unsafe. Regardless of where the produce is from,  fruits and vegetables are a healthy part of the diet. 

We know that the COVID-19 virus doesn’t appear to last long on organic surfaces like the outside of fruits and vegetables, and it doesn’t appear that we can get sick from ‘eating’ the virus. But there are some general food safety steps that we always recommend when eating or preparing fresh fruits and vegetables. 

Start by washing your hands, then rinse all fresh fruits and vegetables with clean running water and dry with a paper towel before you eat or prepare them. Scrub the surfaces of melons, apples or other firm items.  If you want an added safety step, dip rinsed fruits and vegetables in a vinegar solution of 2 cups vinegar + 2 cups water, allow to stand for 1 minute, then rinse again with clean water and dry with a paper towel. Research has shown that this vinegar rinse will help remove harmful bacteria like Salmonella. Whether the vinegar rinse will destroy the coronavirus, we don’t yet know but we do know that it won’t hurt.

 

What can I do to help make sure that the food that someone prepares for, and feeds, their family is safe?

Foodborne bacteria like Salmonella make thousands of people sick every year. The food safety steps you can take to make sure you don’t get a foodborne illness like salmonellosis can also help protect you from the coronavirus. Follow these 5 easy steps: 

1. Clean hands and surfaces often. Hand washing is key in fighting COVID-19.

2. Cook food to proper temperatures. The coronavirus will be killed by proper cooking or reheating.

3. Chill, keep cold foods cold and refrigerate leftovers promptly.

4. Separate to prevent cross-contamination. Hand washing will help to prevent cross-transfer.

5. Choose safe foods and practice safe eating habits. Avoid raw meat, seafood, eggs; raw flour or dough; raw milk; and sprouted seeds (sprouts).

You keep mentioning hand washing. Why is that so important? Is there a special way to wash our hands?

The Centers for Disease Control says that hand washing is the most important defense against all illnesses; a foodborne illness like Salmonella or a respiratory illness like COVID-19.  Hand washing with plain soap and water is easy and one of the best ways to fight the coronavirus.  

Hand washing is easy:

· Wet hands with warm running water and apply soap. Use a bar soap or liquid hand soap, either will work.

· Rub hands together to make a lather. Lather for at least 20 seconds. The time it takes to sing the ABC song.

· Rinse hands well under running water.

· Dry, preferably with a paper towel. But a clean cloth towel will work too. 

 

What about instant hand sanitizers?

The Centers for Disease Control says that washing with soap and water is the best way to clean our hands.  But hand sanitizers may be OK in a pinch, when soap and water aren’t available.  Choose a hand sanitizer with 60-70% alcohol. Rub the hand sanitizer across your hands, the palms and top of your hands and between your fingers, for 20 seconds. Let air dry. Don’t dry your hands on your pants or clothes, this might make them dirty all over again. 

Sturgeon Bay manufacturer stepping up to sanitize PPEs

Therma-Tron-X in Sturgeon Bay is working with Michigan Technological University to build mobile units that will clean COVID-19 Personal Protection Equipment.   TTX is an industrial and heat processing equipment manufacturer that makes ovens and that concept is being used to generate heat in the units up to 170 degrees that is enough to kill the coronavirus.  An engineering team from Michigan Tech tested a prototype unit called Mobile Thermal Utility (MTU) Sanitizer last week.   Therma-Tron-X owner Brad Andrae along with his daughter Amy, a biomedical engineer by training and director of IT at TTX, and his son-in-law Dan Barnard, who co-invented the design, brainstormed up a plan.   Andrae shares how the concept of the unit came about.

 

 

Dan’s cousin Andrew Barnard is a mechanical engineer and professor at Michigan Tech.  He collaborated on the idea that could disinfect up to 60,000 PPE units or more per day.  The CDC came down with new specifications last week to heat at 140 degrees at 80 percent relative humidity for 15 minutes in order to kill not only viruses but also staph infections on PPE like masks, gowns, and gurneys.  Andrae says that TTX was then asked by Michigan Tech to build a modified version of the MTU Sanitizer.

 

 

The electrically-heated unit may require up to 90 minutes to reach temperatures to sanitize but can run on a simple 100 amp service or generator.  TTX is covering the cost of making the unit at this point, not knowing yet how it will be funded, according to Andrae.    

 

(photo courtesy of Michigan Technological University)

 

Help of Door County addressing sexual violence

A local advocacy group is working to stem the increase of domestic assaults in the community.  Help of Door County is still offering services 24/7 for victims of domestic abuse.  Despite closed offices to the public, victims can reach out anytime for emergency appointments with a staff member from Help of Door County.  Executive Director Milly Gonzales says during this time of Safer at Home, the most vulnerable are at a higher risk.  She notes that Help of Door County is just a call away.

 


Gonzales notes that April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and that intimate partners can use abuse to intimidate, control, and demean victims of domestic violence.  You can find more information on crisis intervention and services proved by Help of Door County with this story
online.

Easter coming at the right time

For many Christians, the story of Easter is a welcome metaphor for dealing with the coronavirus. Pastor Joel McKenney of Algoma’s St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church and Pastor Nancy Bontempo of Friends Community Church both say the fear associated with the coronavirus will sneak its way into their Easter messages when they talk to listeners on Sunday. McKenney hopes Jesus’ resurrection gives them the hope they need to move past it.

Bontempo believes the story of Easter is the exact opposite of the hopelessness people are feeling right now.

Area Christians will be logging onto their computers, sitting in front of the TV, and tuning their radios for Easter services. The radio stations of DoorCountyDailyNews.com will feature five Easter services this weekend, including St. Paul’s Lutheran Church at 9 a.m. and Friends Community Church at 10 a.m. on 96.7 WBDK. 

 

THE TRUE MEANING OF EASTER FROM FRIENDS COMMUNITY CHURCH

 

OTHER SERVICES BEING BROADCAST ON THE RADIO STATIONS OF DOORCOUNTYDAILYNEWS.COM

At 8 a.m. you can worship with St. Francis and St. Mary Catholic Church in Brussels on 104.1 WRLU.

On WBDK:

St. Joseph’s Catholic Parish - 8 a.m.

St. Mary’s Catholic Church - 11 a.m.

Door County reports ninth confirmed case of COVID-19

The Ninth COVID-19 case has been confirmed in Door County according to local health officials on Friday afternoon.  Door County Public Health is contacting anyone who may have been in close contact with all infected individuals.  Public health officials remind people of the importance of following the CDC guidelines on social distancing and maintaining good hand washing to prevent the spread of the virus.  All travel to and from Door County is highly discouraged. Door County Public Health reports that there have been a total of 157 tests performed in the county with 95 total negative results and 53 still pending as of 2 pm Friday.  By law, no names are being released.  You can find the complete news release with this story online.   

Maple-Oregon Street Bridge project postponed

Plans to work on a downtown bridge in Sturgeon Bay have been postponed. Inspections of the Maple-Oregon Street Bridge Thursday determined the needed deck repairs can wait until May. That is when manager Jeremy Ashauer says they will start the first of two stages for the project.

 

 


Now that it has been delayed, the Maple-Oregon Street Bridge project will be spread over three weeks beginning in May instead of the originally scheduled five weeks.

Coronavirus bill pending in state legislature

Republican and Democratic leaders are continuing to work on an aid package in hopes of mitigating the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. According to the Associated Press, the proposed bill is designed to supplement the $2.3 billion the state is receiving from the federal stimulus package. Eliminating the one week waiting period for unemployment benefits, lifting instructional hour minimums for schools, and postponing certain requirements for healthcare workers and Medicaid recipients are just some of the highlights. The proposed bill would also give the Joint Finance Committee the ability to cut certain parts of the state budget to make up for a possible deficit due to declining revenues. That is being met with opposition from Governor Tony Evers and some Democrats like State Senator Dave Hansen.

Republican Representative Joel Kitchens says despite the administration’s pushback, he has been encouraged by Democrats and Republicans working together on the bill.

The final legislation related to the coronavirus is expected to be finalized in the coming weeks.

Tech helps businesses change on the fly

Door County businesses are embracing technology while bracing for the impact the COVID-19 outbreak could have on their bottom line. With non-essential travel being discouraged, it is anybody’s guess when the “busy season” will start and end in Door County. Grocery stores like Main Street Market in Egg Harbor have already had to adjust with employees doing the shopping for customers one email at a time. Wood Orchard Market in Egg Harbor is preparing for a delayed start to the season by introducing a web-based ordering system where customers can drive-up, scan a QR code, and shop for their favorite items without leaving their car. Owner Crista Kochanski says the system has been duplicated across the country and believes in times like these, you have to adjust.

In addition to a limited amount of their own products, Wood Orchard Market is partnering with other local vendors affected by COVID-19 to sell items like bread, milk, and meat.

 

 

Picture Courtesy of Wood Orchard Market

 

Extension cord ignites Jacksonport Fire

An overloaded extension cord is to blame for a small garage fire in the town of Jacksonport Friday morning. It was around 2:20 a.m. when members of the Jacksonport and Egg Harbor Fire Department responded to the report of smoke coming out of the garage of a home located on Lost Lake Road. The extension cord, which had several things plugged into it, was located above the floor in the garage and started some of the contents inside the structure on fire. Jacksonport Fire Chief Tom Ash says there are some valuable lessons that came out of it.

The scene was cleared shortly before 3:45 a.m. Ash says there were no injuries in the fire and estimates there was about $5,000 worth of the damage.

Beach access limited and rockier at Whitefish Dunes

Visitors to Whitefish Dunes State Park in Door County will continue to have limited beach access because of higher water levels on Lake Michigan.  The nearest entry point near the Nature Center will likely remain closed this summer as it has been for the past two-years. Currently, there is only one entry point off of the Red Trail about a mile from the parking area.  Park Superintendent Erin Brown-Stender says erosion has forced the temporary closure of the third access point.

 

 

Brown-Stender says even while two access points may eventually be open, visitors will notice the beach is less sandy than the past two years.

 

 

 

Governor Tony Evers announced Thursday that some 40 Wisconsin State Parks and trails would be closed but Door County's five state parks remain open though social distancing requirements and limits of no more than 10 people in a group remain in effect.  State park campgrounds remain closed through April 30th. 

 

 

Dorner adjusting to changes as new WBA president

Jeff Dorner did not know what to expect in his first year as president of the Wisconsin Builders Association, but the ability to not travel around the state was not one of them.  Having to conduct meetings through video conferencing and lobbying to classify landscapers as essential businesses are just two of the challenges Dorner says the WBA has dealt with recently.

 

 

Dorner, a sales and art designer for Van’s Lumber & Custom Builders in Dyckesville, is also the treasurer of the Door County Home Builders Association.  He says the WBA staff has been doing a great job in keeping people throughout the state informed.  The WBA was able to get landscapers exempted from Governor Tony Evers’ closure order of all non-essential businesses.

 

(photo courtesy of the Door County Home Builders Association)

 

City council "virtual" meeting approves new Younkers building agreement

The Sturgeon Bay Common Council was able to get business done under unusual circumstances Thursday evening at City Hall. The regular meeting was held Thursday due to Tuesday's election and most council members attended through video-conferencing on Zoom. Mayor David Ward and Council President Dan Williams were the only two elected officials that were present in the council chambers. The 90-minute meeting was highlighted by the unanimous approval of SBLifeisGood, LLC owners Todd Trimberger and Dr. Kelton Reitz agreement with the city to purchase the former Younkers building at 58 N. Third Avenue and renovate it to house an expanded version of their store Bliss which is currently located on Jefferson Street. The council also approved a resolution authorizing a Community Development Investment Grant through the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation that could be up to $250,000. Other business approved included accepting the bid for engineering services by Baudhuin Engineering for improvements to Otumba Beach and a separate proposal to update the Otumba Shelter.   Work is to begin later this spring for the shelter and in 2021 for the overall beach repair caused by high water. Mayor Ward added that the Sturgeon Bay Common Council will hold an organizational meeting on April 24 to set up committees and appointments. He thanked outgoing alderperson Kelly Avenson from District 4 for serving the past two years on the council.  

Sevastopol art teacher goes virtually creative helping students

An elementary art teacher is using video to help her students and others learn more about sketching and painting.  Sevastopol Elementary School Art Teacher Cara Krueger is using the time away from the classroom to record videos of her home art lessons on her youtube account.  She offers a daily sketch of the day and tutorials on how to make homemade art supplies.

 

 

What started as an online learning experience for her students expanded to anyone who is looking to enjoy art.  Krueger is also doing a Fun Friday Challenge including a “Happy Heart Hunt” this past week that is displaying artwork in windows to show support to the community.   You can find Krueger’s most recent video on how to make yarn cord with this story below.

 

  

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCG2bT8K5bIHdHuyynUNeJ4g/

 

Law enforcement explains following their "Safer at Home" orders

A joint social media post by the top law enforcement officers in Door County clarified how they are enforcing the "Safer at Home Order" instilled by Governor Tony Evers last month. Sheriff Tammy Sternard, Sturgeon Bay Police Chief Arleigh Porter, and Door County District Attorney Colleen Nordin shared the post on Thursday morning on Facebook, which addressed the frequently asked questions their departments are receiving. Here are two of the answers given.  Law enforcement cannot prevent people from traveling into Door County by setting up checkpoints or closing borders. Officers cannot pull over a vehicle only because it has out of state license plates. Law enforcement must have reasonable suspicion to pull over any vehicle. The Safer at Home Order specifically allows travel to return to a place of residence from outside the county, including summer homes or second residences.

 

 

 

 

Meals cooperative meeting demand

Instead of telling people to come earlier, the Door County Meals Cooperative is just making sure they are cooking more food to serve. Last week the partnership served approximately 600 meals a day across its seven sites in Door and Kewaunee Counties. Volunteers would often run out of food before its 5:30 p.m. wrap-up time and now has long lines waiting for pick-up before its 3 p.m. start. Program Director Adam Peronto says in order to make sure it meets the demand of the less fortunate in the community, it will be turning out 750 to 800 meals a day out of its kitchen at the Boys and Girls Club in Sturgeon Bay. Thanks to the support of its volunteers, partners, and local businesses, Peronto says they are beginning to do even more than just distribute meals.

Peronto says people can support their efforts by donating anything from food and money to offset their costs to small toys to bring an extra smile to a child’s face. 

 

Picture courtesy of the Door County Meals Cooperative

 

 

Farmers adjust crops to the situation

Long before the coronavirus caused farmers in some states to start panic buying certain commodities, Rio Creek Feed Mill agronomist Adam Barta knew fields would look a little different this year. Last year’s wet weather is to blame for many of the changes as farmers wait to see how their alfalfa overwinters and combat with an expected shortage of straw this year. Barta says farmers are resilient and he has seen several different ways they are being resourceful with uncertainty ahead of them and a poor year in the rearview mirror.

Bloomberg Businessweek blames worries about feed mills closing and slaughterhouses slowing production for the panic-buying so they are prepared if they have to keep their animals longer. Barta says Rio Creek Feed Mill has taken several precautions to make sure their employees and their customers stay safe.

Supporting hospitals one mask at a time

Area hospitals like Door County Medical Center are renewing their call for volunteers to make cloth masks for visitors and staff members. Last week the Centers for Disease Control recommended that all Americans wear a facial cloth covering in public settings. That has become even more important in hospital settings where patients could be fending off COVID-19 and other illnesses. ­  Door County Medical Center Logistics Manager Andrew Starr salutes community members that have been able to turn a few pieces of cloth and a little elastic into a potential lifesaver.

Door County Medical Center is asking people to drop off their donated cloth masks at the emergency and main entrances of the hospital between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. 

 

 

 

 

Northern Sky Theater cancels outdoor season

Bill Zapper will have to wait to get married another year at Peninsula State Park after Northern Sky Theater announced Wednesday it was canceling its entire outdoor season due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Zapper is the main character of "Love Stings," which was scheduled to make its world premiere alongside revivals of Belgians in Heaven and Fishing for the Moon. Artistic Director Jeff Herbst never imagined they would be put in this position, but says canceling the outdoor season was the right thing to do.

 

 

Northern Sky Theater is also canceling two of its summer indoor shows at its new Gould Theater, but hopes to welcome audiences beginning July 15th when "Dad's Season Tickets" returns to its stage.

 

 

DCMC ready to handle more COVID19 patients

Door County Medical Center is prepared for an increase in patients with COVID19 without the use of temporary treatment facilities.  That's because DCMC has enough space to handle those cases.  Changes in state regulations are allowing the hospital to accommodate more patients than allowed by its current license.  DCMC President/CEO Brian Stephens says plans have been developed to convert existing facilities to treat additional patients as needed.

 

 

Stephens also says DCMC has a staffing plan in place for increased COVID19 cases.  That includes cross-training doctors and nurses to handle increased patient admissions.

 

 

DOOR COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH

COVID-19 SITUATION UPDATE

April 8, 2020

 

`

 

 
 

 

 

 

Public Health LOGO

 

Door County COVID-19 Update

April 8, 2020 Confirmed Cases

 

Wisconsin

 

Positive: 2,756

Negative: 30,115

Deaths: 99

Door County Tests Performed:

140

Door County Tests

Pending:

43

Confirmed Cases

In Door County

 

8

Door County Negative Results

 

89

 

Please note: The Door County numbers reported include only the positive cases reported to Public Health at the time of this report.  COVID-19 statistics are changing rapidly and are not intended to represent real time statistics.

 

Please continue to adhere to the “Safer at Home” guidelines.

We know that COVID 19 is spreading throughout the United States and Wisconsin.

 

Travel to and from Door County is highly discouraged at this time

If you choose to return to Door County, Door County Public Health requests that you self-quarantine for a full 14 days.

 

If you have immediate questions, you may contact Public Health during regular business hours (Monday-Friday 8:00am-4:30pm)

at 920-746-2234

 

 

 
 

Please take the “Safer at Home” guidelines seriously.  COVID-19 is spreading throughout Wisconsin.

 

 
The first case of COVID-19 was reported in Door County on March 30, 2020.

According to experts, case counts only reflect a fraction (estimated 10%) of the total positive cases of COVID-19 present across the state.

Door County Public Health is actively responding to all cases of COVID 19. 

You will be contacted if it has been determined that you may have been in close contact with an infected person.

Our best defense against COVID-19 is washing our hands frequently; avoiding touching our eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands; wearing a cloth face covering in public; avoiding being around sick people; and physically distancing by staying at home.

NEW! Cloth face covers are recommended when individuals must leave the home to conduct essential activities, when sick, and for those who have seasonal allergies.

What is  

 

 
All individuals in the state of Wisconsin are ordered to stay at home or at their place of residence, with limited exceptions. Individuals who are using shared or outdoor space other than their home or residence, must, at all times and to the extent possible, maintain social distancing of at least 6 feet from another person. Individuals do not need to maintain social distancing between family members in a single living unit or with other household members.

All individuals may leave their home or residence for a number of essential activities and functions including health and safety, such as picking up medications, visits with health care providers; obtaining groceries and food, buying gas or pet food, and other activities necessary to maintain the home or residence; outdoor activities, such as walking, biking, hiking or running while maintaining social distancing (does not include contact sports such as basketball); taking care of others, including friends and pets; and the travel associated with such tasks. See Emergency Order #12 for additional information.

See the Understanding "Safer at  Home" flyer and Safer at Home FAQs for more information.

 

 

DOOR COUNTY Home  

April 8, 2020: Press Release - Stay Safe by Practicing Religion and Spirituality from Home
April 7, 2020 Frequently Asked Questions about COVID-19 in Door County
April 6, 2020 - NEW! Use of Cloth Face Coverings to Help Slow the Spread of COVID-19
Visit and “Like” our Facebook page for current updates https://www.facebook.com/doorcountypublichealth/
United Way 211 Community Resource Guide
Door County Emergency Support Coalition: To request non-emergency assistance with services or have questions or call (920) 421-9111
 

STATE OF WISCONSIN

?April 7, 2020: Press Release-Gov. Evers' Message to Wisconsinites on Election Day?
 

A screenshot of a social media post

Description automatically generated

 
            COVID-19: Wisconsin Data

    Click on image to go to the WI Department of Health Services

 

 

 

 

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

Current Cases in the United States – 395,011
April 6, 2020 New COVIDView - A weekly surveillance summary of U.S. COVID-19 activity.
April 6, 2020 Weekly Update DHS Response to Covid-19
March 26, 2020 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Situation Summary
 

A screenshot of a cell phone

Description automatically generated

 

Current Situational Report from the Centers of Disease and Control and Prevention

 

Click on the map to visit  Centers of Disease Control and Prevention site

 

 

WHAT TO DO IF YOU’RE FEELING SICK

 

Patients with COVID-19 can experience mild to severe respiratory illness.

 

If you are experiencing MILD or MODERATE symptoms, such as fever, runny nose or cough, do NOT go to the Emergency Room. Call your primary health care provider prior to going to a clinic.

Your primary care provider will evaluate if testing is necessary, and direct you to a facility that can conduct sampling.

This will ensure that healthcare professionals can prepare in advance should you need to receive testing or treatment. Seeking the most appropriate level of care will help protect the community and minimize exposure to other patients and staff.

 

If you have symptoms and feel you need testing call Door County Medical Center COVID-19 Screening Hotline at 920-746-3700.

 

If you are experiencing SEVERE illness, call your doctor's office immediately or go to the Emergency Room. Call ahead and let them know you may have COVID-19 so they can be prepared.

 

Symptoms of SEVERE illness can include*:

Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
New confusion or inability to arouse
Bluish lips or face
*This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

 

If you are experiencing a medical emergency (you cannot breathe) call 911 and tell them if you believe you may have COVID-19.

 

If you do not have symptoms of COVID-19, you DO NOT need to be tested.

 

CDC recommendations for what to do if you are sick

Caring for yourself at home: 10 things to manage your health at home

Information for people at high risk of serious illness from COVID-19

 

PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COVID -19

A screenshot of a cell phone

Description automatically generated

 

 

 

 

 

See CDC's advice on how to protect yourself from COVID-19.

 

Wash your hands often with soap and water. Use hand sanitizer if you do not have soap and water
Cover your nose and mouth when you cough or sneeze, and then throw the tissue away. If you do not have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your sleeve.
Do not have close contact with people who are sick and stay home if you are feeling sick.
Clean and disinfect surfaces thoroughly.
Practice social distancing which includes avoiding crowded places, increasing interpersonal space (ideally separation of 6 feet) and not shaking hands.
Don’t touch eyes or mouth with hands.
NEW! Use of Cloth Face Coverings to Help Slow the Spread of COVID-19
 

 

DOMESTIC TRAVEL GUIDANCE

DHS recommends Wisconsin residents cancel or postpone all nonessential travel, including travel within the state.
Travel between private homes within the state, including seasonal homes or rental cabins, is strongly discouraged.
Several counties in Wisconsin have issued travel advisories for seasonal and second homeowners. If you choose to travel to a second home in Wisconsin, you should be prepared to immediately self-quarantine for 14 days. You should bring your own groceries and essentials, as self-quarantine does not permit shopping at local stores for supplies.
 

WI Department of Health Services Travel Recommendations

 

List of states with Community Transmission

(click the + under the map)

 

 

 

ADDITIONAL GUIDANCE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepare at home

 

Community Events

 

Schools and Child Care

 

Business and Employers

 

Community and Faith Based

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-term Care Facilities

 

Law and First Responders

 

Higher Education

 

Volunteer

 

Medicare recipients and Medicare providers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Resources      

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) COVID-19 Information and Resources
Essential Business Listing: https://wedc.org/essentialbusiness/
Full Library of Print Resources for schools, businesses, etc. from the CDC
BEWARE!  COVID 19 scam
Mental Wellness in the Face of COVID-19 <

Algoma coloring sidewalks with uplifting messages

The Algoma Youth Club is keeping young, and the young-at-heart engaged in activities even though the community center facility is not open to the public at this time.  City of Algoma Parks Director Sara Robertson says a family chalk art contest is currently underway and is offering a fun diversion for students that are outside the classroom.  She explains the details behind the promotion.

 


The sidewalk chalk art contest began last week with this Thursday being the deadline.  Voting will take place until Easter Sunday.  Robertson says even if you don’t have chalk, you can mix equal parts of cornstarch and water with food coloring.  You can paintbrush your colorful message of the artwork.  

 

 

Email photos of your chalk artwork to:


sara.robertson@algomacity.org

 

Door County confirmed cases of COVID-19 up to eight

The Door County Health Department announced Wednesday the eighth confirmed case of the coronavirus in the county.  Door County performed 140 tests as of 2 pm Wednesday with 89 negative results and 43 that are still pending.  The “Safer at Home” guidelines are being asked to be followed with travel to and from Door County being highly discouraged.  Anyone returning to Door County is being requested to self-quarantine for 14 days.  The first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in Door County on Monday, March 30.  The State of Wisconsin has tested over 32,000 individuals with 2756 testing positive and 99 reported deaths as of Wednesday.  

 

News release:

 

DOOR COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH

COVID-19 SITUATION UPDATE

April 8, 2020

 

`

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Health LOGO

 

Door County COVID-19 Update

April 8, 2020 Confirmed Cases

 

Wisconsin

 

Positive: 2,756

Negative: 30,115

Deaths: 99

Door County Tests Performed:

140

Door County Tests

Pending:

43

Confirmed Cases

In Door County

 

8

Door County Negative Results

 

89

 

Please note: The Door County numbers reported include only the positive cases reported to Public Health at the time of this report.  COVID-19 statistics are changing rapidly and are not intended to represent real time statistics.

 

Please continue to adhere to the “Safer at Home” guidelines.

We know that COVID 19 is spreading throughout the United States and Wisconsin.

 

Travel to and from Door County is highly discouraged at this time

If you choose to return to Door County, Door County Public Health requests that you self-quarantine for a full 14 days.

 

If you have immediate questions, you may contact Public Health during regular business hours (Monday-Friday 8:00am-4:30pm)

at 920-746-2234

 

 

 

 

Please take the “Safer at Home” guidelines seriously.  COVID-19 is spreading throughout Wisconsin.

 

 

The first case of COVID-19 was reported in Door County on March 30, 2020.

According to experts, case counts only reflect a fraction (estimated 10%) of the total positive cases of COVID-19 present across the state.

Door County Public Health is actively responding to all cases of COVID 19. 

You will be contacted if it has been determined that you may have been in close contact with an infected person.

Our best defense against COVID-19 is washing our hands frequently; avoiding touching our eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands; wearing a cloth face covering in public; avoiding being around sick people; and physically distancing by staying at home.

NEW! Cloth face covers are recommended when individuals must leave the home to conduct essential activities, when sick, and for those who have seasonal allergies.

What is  

 

 

All individuals in the state of Wisconsin are ordered to stay at home or at their place of residence, with limited exceptions. Individuals who are using shared or outdoor space other than their home or residence, must, at all times and to the extent possible, maintain social distancing of at least 6 feet from another person. Individuals do not need to maintain social distancing between family members in a single living unit or with other household members.

All individuals may leave their home or residence for a number of essential activities and functions including health and safety, such as picking up medications, visits with health care providers; obtaining groceries and food, buying gas or pet food, and other activities necessary to maintain the home or residence; outdoor activities, such as walking, biking, hiking or running while maintaining social distancing (does not include contact sports such as basketball); taking care of others, including friends and pets; and the travel associated with such tasks. See Emergency Order #12 for additional information.

See the Understanding "Safer at  Home" flyer and Safer at Home FAQs for more information.

 

 

DOOR COUNTY Home  

 

STATE OF WISCONSIN

 

A screenshot of a social media post

Description automatically generated

  •  

            COVID-19: Wisconsin Data

    Click on image to go to the WI Department of Health Services

 

 

 

 

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

 

A screenshot of a cell phone

Description automatically generated

 

Current Situational Report from the Centers of Disease and Control and Prevention

 

Click on the map to visit  Centers of Disease Control and Prevention site

 

 

WHAT TO DO IF YOU’RE FEELING SICK

 

Patients with COVID-19 can experience mild to severe respiratory illness.

 

If you are experiencing MILD or MODERATE symptoms, such as fever, runny nose or cough, do NOT go to the Emergency Room. Call your primary health care provider prior to going to a clinic.

Your primary care provider will evaluate if testing is necessary, and direct you to a facility that can conduct sampling.

This will ensure that healthcare professionals can prepare in advance should you need to receive testing or treatment. Seeking the most appropriate level of care will help protect the community and minimize exposure to other patients and staff.

 

If you have symptoms and feel you need testing call Door County Medical Center COVID-19 Screening Hotline at 920-746-3700.

 

If you are experiencing SEVERE illness, call your doctor's office immediately or go to the Emergency Room. Call ahead and let them know you may have COVID-19 so they can be prepared.

 

Symptoms of SEVERE illness can include*:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all inclusivePlease consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

 

If you are experiencing a medical emergency (you cannot breathe) call 911 and tell them if you believe you may have COVID-19.

 

If you do not have symptoms of COVID-19, you DO NOT need to be tested.

 

CDC recommendations for what to do if you are sick

Caring for yourself at home: 10 things to manage your health at home

Information for people at high risk of serious illness from COVID-19

 

PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COVID -19

A screenshot of a cell phone

Description automatically generated

 

 

 

 

 

See CDC's advice on how to protect yourself from COVID-19.

 

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. Use hand sanitizer if you do not have soap and water
  • Cover your nose and mouth when you cough or sneeze, and then throw the tissue away. If you do not have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your sleeve.
  • Do not have close contact with people who are sick and stay home if you are feeling sick.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces thoroughly.
  • Practice social distancing which includes avoiding crowded places, increasing interpersonal space (ideally separation of 6 feet) and not shaking hands.
  • Don’t touch eyes or mouth with hands.
  • NEW! Use of Cloth Face Coverings to Help Slow the Spread of COVID-19

 

 

DOMESTIC TRAVEL GUIDANCE

  • DHS recommends Wisconsin residents cancel or postpone all nonessential travel, including travel within the state.
  • Travel between private homes within the state, including seasonal homes or rental cabins, is strongly discouraged.
  • Several counties in Wisconsin have issued travel advisories for seasonal and second homeowners. If you choose to travel to a second home in Wisconsin, you should be prepared to immediately self-quarantine for 14 days. You should bring your own groceries and essentials, as self-quarantine does not permit shopping at local stores for supplies.

 

WI Department of Health Services Travel Recommendations

 

List of states with Community Transmission

(click the + under the map)

 

 

 

ADDITIONAL GUIDANCE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepare at home

 

Community Events

 

Schools and Child Care

 

Business and Employers

 

Community and Faith Based

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-term Care Facilities

 

Law and First Responders

 

Higher Education

 

Volunteer

 

Medicare recipients and Medicare providers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Resources      

Catholics prepare for Easter services

Whether there are people in their sanctuaries or not, area Catholic churches are still proceeding with their Holy Week services. After celebrating Palm Sunday, Catholics will celebrate the Last Supper, Jesus’ death, and his resurrection over the course of four services beginning on Thursday.  Father Bob Stegmann of St. Joseph’s parish and St. Peter & Paul Catholic Church in Sturgeon Bay is offering a unique opportunity for his congregation to participate in the Eucharistic adoration on Holy Thursday.

 

 

Father John Broussard of the National Shrine of Our Lady of Good Help in Champion says Jesus’ resurrection can be even more inspiring as people around the world suffer from the effects of the coronavirus.

Father Dan Schuster of St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Luxemburg and Holy Trinity Parish in Casco hopes people log off from his services with a feeling of discipleship.

Many Catholic churches have moved to YouTube and Facebook to broadcast their Holy Week masses to their members, while three will be featured Easter Sunday on the radio stations of DoorCountyDailyNews.com. At 8 a.m. you can worship with St. Francis and St. Mary Catholic Church in Brussels on 104.1 WRLU and St. Joseph’s Catholic Parish on 96.7 WBDK. St. Mary’s Catholic Church will have its Easter mass carried live on 96.7 WBDK at 11 a.m.

 

TRUE MEANING OF EASTER WITH THE NATIONAL SHRINE OF OUR LADY OF GOOD HELP

Service information available by clicking this link

 

TRUE MEANING OF EASTER WITH ST. MARY'S/HOLY TRINITY CATHOLIC PARISHES

Service information available by clicking this link

Council to discuss new Younkers building owner

A major hole in the downtown Sturgeon Bay retail landscape could be filled if it is approved by the Sturgeon Bay City Council on Thursday. SBLifeisGood, LLC owners Todd Trimberger and Dr. Kelton Reitz are looking to purchase the former Younkers building at 58 N. Third Avenue and renovate it to house an expanded version of their store Bliss and other local businesses. It wants to enter a development agreement with the city so it can receive help tearing down an obsolete skywalk and to move the building’s public bathrooms to the first floor. The city has already budgeted most of the $125,000 requested for the project to construct a public restroom facility in the downtown area. Sturgeon Bay Community Development Director Marty Olejniczak hopes a Community Development Investment Grant from the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation helps the project get closer to becoming a reality.

The Sturgeon Bay Common Council will weigh in on both the development agreement and the grant when it meets Thursday at 7 p.m.

Pushing students to stay connected

Staying connected is easier said than done during this time of remote learning for students and staff. A story in the New York Times shows students that are low-income or in areas where it is hard to connect to the internet are behind in their remote learning assignments if they are doing them at all. After completing its first five days of remote learning last week, Sturgeon Bay School District Superintendent Dan Tjernagel says students struggling when they are in the building are not faring much better now outside of it.

Gibraltar Secondary School Counselor Chelsea Roberts is not doing much better than some of her students, living in a self-described “dead zone” when it comes to her internet and cell phone coverage. Through email, she advised students struggling to reach out and let staff members know if they need anything. She says that “we live in a time where we need to be flexible and understanding. We just need to communicate (even though it’s from a distance) with each other in these times to work through it.” School buildings are closed indefinitely due to the COVID-19 pandemic, meaning remote learning is not going away anytime soon.

Deputies track down robber in Kewaunee County

The Kewaunee County Sheriff’s Department has one robber in custody and is looking for an attempted robbery suspect after an eventful overnight shift for deputies. At approximately 8:30 p.m. Tuesday night, an unidentified man wearing a college sweatshirt, sunglasses, and a dark-colored mask tried robbing a gas station in the town of Carlton. The suspect left the store after the clerk denied him the money he was trying to get. In a separate incident at around 3 a.m., deputies responded to a broken window and a burglarized car in the Village of Luxemburg. They were able to find the suspect in that crime, who later admitted entering and stealing from multiple vehicles in Luxemburg and Kewaunee. Sheriff Matt Joski says it is a reminder for all residents to take the necessary steps to secure their vehicles.

Joski believes the incidents are unrelated and says they are both are under investigation. We have more information on both incidents, including a picture of the suspect in the attempted robbery, with this story.

 

 

RELEASES

 

Incident # 20-02245

 

(Kewaunee, WI) On April 7th, 2020 at approximately 8:30 PM The Kewaunee County Sheriff’s Department received a call of an attempted Robbery at the L&L One Stop located in the Town of Carlton. The caller stated that the suspect, a male subject described as tall and thin wearing a red Wisconsin Badgers Sweatshirt, sunglasses and a dark colored mask entered the convenience store and demanded money. The caller stated that she refused to provide any money and the subject then left the store.

 

This incident remains under investigation and if you or anyone you know has information related to this incident, you are asked to contact the Kewaunee County Sheriff’s Department at (920)388-7108 

 

Incident # 20-02251

 

(Luxemburg, WI) On April 8th, 2020 at approximately 3:11 AM the Kewaunee County Sheriff’s Department received a complaint of theft from motor vehicles in the Village of Luxemburg. The caller stated that the suspect had broken a window in her vehicle to gain access and that the suspect had just left the scene.

 

Deputies from the Kewaunee County Sheriff’s Department were able to respond quickly and in a short time were able to detain the suspect involved. The suspect subsequently admitted to entering multiple vehicles in the Village of Luxemburg as well as in the City of Kewaunee. Numerous stolen items were recovered.

 

This incident remains under investigation and charges will be referred to the Kewaunee County District Attorney.

Absentee voting paces turnout

Clerks in Door and Kewaunee Counties were happy with the voter participation in the spring election despite the challenges that were presented. Results and final vote totals from the spring election will not be released until April 13th, but as of Tuesday night Kewaunee County had received 2,890 of the 3,974 absentee ballots it sent out. Door County collected 4,293 of the 7,474 ballots it put in the mail. Clerks in both counties said things ran smoothly at polling places all things considered. First District State Representative Joel Kitchens disagreed with the U.S. Supreme Court, but respected their decision to not extend the absentee voting deadline just in case people did not receive their ballots in time. In the end, he wishes the Legislature and the Evers administration could have discussed how to handle the election in the middle of a pandemic sooner.

Kitchens thanks the county clerks, poll workers, and the seventeen members of the Wisconsin National Guard for their efforts to make sure people who wanted to vote in Tuesday’s election were able to do so.

Local restaurants offering Easter feasts takeout style

Since families will not be eating out this Easter, area restaurants are relying on take-out options for the traditional meal.  Following last month’s state order that mandated restaurants to close dining rooms until at least April 24, take-out or delivery are the only options left for those who don’t want to cook at home.  Kelly Froelich of the Rendezvous of Luxemburg says that they are even including whole pies to complement chicken or ham dinners.

 

 

Some other restaurants in Door County are offering take-out options for Easter as well, including Wanda Jeans Family Restaurant in Sturgeon Bay and Thyme Cuisine in Baileys Harbor.  You can find a complete list of area restaurants that are still serving food on the new OpenDoorCounty.com website. 

 

Kewaunee County Food Pantry adjusting to demand and guidelines

The Kewaunee County Food Pantry in Algoma has seen a sizeable increase in demand for families in the area, according to pantry president Ken Marquardt.  With more families needing assistance due to layoffs during the COVID-19 crisis, pantries like the Kewaunee County Food Pantry are working to meet the needs of the community.  Marquardt says his staff has been working through the logistics of serving his clients and following guidelines.

 

 

The Kewaunee County Food Pantry in Algoma recently received a $3,000grant from the Greater Green Bay Community Foundation for food and supplies.  He says donations are still accepted and that canned fruits, vegetables, and soups are in the greatest demand.   The pantry located near the Algoma’s Industrial Park is open 11-1 every Monday and Wednesday. 

 

Polling stations change with the times; results coming next week

Voting on Tuesday took on a whole different look than past elections throughout the state of Wisconsin due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  Polls were open throughout Door and Kewaunee Counties as extra precautions were taken to protect poll workers and voters who chose to vote in-person.  Absentee ballots were strongly recommended by state officials.  In Sturgeon Bay, District 6 and 7 voters at the Jaycee Court location were greeted with instructions to keep social distancing and use hand sanitizer when entering to vote.  Chief Inspector Stephanie Soucek says the in-person voting went smoothly for the staff and residents.

 

 

Soucek says the polling locations had an ample number of workers for the number of voters that came in on Tuesday.  Some City of Sturgeon Bay employees helped at various polling locations as City Hall took on some of the west side voters who usually cast a ballot at Bayview Lutheran Church.  You can see a video of the polling layout at the Jaycee Court location below.

Results from the statewide election will be announced on April 13.   

 

 

 

 

Area manufacturers fulfilling needs

Manufacturers in Door and Kewaunee Counties are making sure items that were afterthoughts before are in high supply now. Hatco Corporation in Sturgeon Bay produced protective shields for the Door County Sheriff’s Department to keep their deputies safe in the Justice Center’s booking room. In Luxemburg, NEW Plastics is producing millions of bottles for hand sanitizer to meet the industry’s demand. NEW Plastics Vice President Lonnie Vincent says its customers have been understanding if some projects need to be put off for a period of time for the COVID-19 response efforts.

Vincent has been encouraged by manufacturers connecting potential customers with other businesses to make certain projects are a reality if they are not been able to help themselves.

 

 

Isolation leading to domestic violence increase

Kewaunee County Sheriff Matt Joski is reminding residents about the local services available to them as domestic and sexual assault are on the rise nationally. A Forbes report shows the U.S. Domestic Violence Hotline has received over 2,300 calls since March 16th where COVID-19 was cited as a condition of the abuse. Isolation orders in some cases have made it worse since some services are not available or harder to access. Even as the dynamics change, Joski says people need to know there are still places they can turn to for support.

Joski says organizations like Algoma’s Violence Intervention Project are doing a great job supporting victims and advocating for change. You can read Joski’s thoughts on Sexual Assault Awareness Month below.

 

FROM SHERIFF MATT JOSKI

The month of April is designated in the State of Wisconsin as Sexual Assault Awareness month. For those who have been impacted by the brutality of these senseless acts the pain and suffering never truly vanishes. Historically the victimization of these crimes did not end with the act itself but unfortunately were further perpetrated by a culture of secrecy and transferred blame on the part of those who were attacked rather than the attacker. For many years these crimes were minimized or even justified based on the condition of the victim or even in some cases the very clothing that they were wearing at the time of the attack.

 

Fortunately those days are over and we as a society have come to recognize the severity of sexual assault for what it is. We have striven to provide the greatest possible support for the victims while working towards the most severe level of accountability for the perpetrators. We have opened channels of communication to those who have had to live in the shadows of victimization allowing their voices to finally be heard. One of the organizations that have been instrumental in this transformation is our own Kewaunee County Violence Intervention Project. Having personally worked alongside these amazing advocates for change, I can attest to both their courage and their dedication in the area of victim support and community awareness.

 

Typically, during the month of April the Kewaunee County Violence Intervention Project would be sponsoring numerous events to bring awareness to this issue; however this has not been a typical year so far. In light of our current restrictions there will be a new but just as interactive way of supporting those who have been victimized as well as to be part of the effort to eliminate these crimes all together.

 

During this time of social distancing and Safer at Home quarantine, the Violence Intervention Project is doing a social media campaign through their Facebook page for Sexual Assault Awareness Month in April. They are asking that you participate, because it is so easy! All you have to do is think of one thing you #cando (or already do) to help support survivors, change the culture of sexual violence, and help to stop all forms of sexual violence in our community. Message the VIP Facebook page with a quote about one the thing you #cando, along with a selfie, and VIP will plug it into a template and share it on Facebook during SAAM. You can then share that post with your own friends and family members so they can virtually participate too! Please forward this to anyone else in your office or department who may be interested; or you can take an older already existing group photo and send a quote about your whole department. There is more information and a list of examples of things you #cando on the website, found here: https://www.vipadvocates.net/events/2020-04/turn-metoo-into-cando-2020-04-01/ 

 

Please take the time to join in supporting those affected by these senseless acts and bringing a greater awareness to our need as a society to rid our communities of any and all Sexual Assaults.

 

 

 

Health officials call for more precautions

While some social distancing practices have been going well, two Door County health officials are calling for residents to take more measures to protect themselves from COVID-19 exposure. Door County Medical Center Chief Medical Officer Dr. Jim Heise and Door County Public Health Officer Sue Powers provided their fourth COVID-19 update on Facebook Monday night after the area’s fifth, sixth, and seventh confirmed cases were announced. Powers called on residents to stay in quarantine after being tested or being possibly exposed to the virus and to avoid even small gatherings with friends and family. Heise urged them to make sure they wash their hands, clean surfaces, and wear a mask when in public. He says that is because you could be a carrier even if you are asymptomatic.

Powers says the county is continuing its call for second-home owners to stay at their primary residence and discourages any kind of non-essential travel until after the COVID-19 outbreak is under control. You can watch the full video with Powers and Heise, which also includes a conversation about testing, below.

 

 

Performing to full houses away from theaters

Door County’s performing arts organizations have had to think outside the box to get their creative juices flowing. Rogue Theater and Third Avenue Playhouse have had to put their spring shows on hold while Northern Sky Theater and Door Shakespeare are planning ahead just in case their summer seasons are delayed. In the meantime, groups have found the Internet as an outlet to perform and reach their audience. Cast members from Northern Sky Theater productions have performed audience favorites for their Facebook page while Rogue Theater has launched a YouTube channel to post new skits. Rogue Theater founder Stuart Champeau says it is not the same as the dinner theater shows they are used to putting on at this time of year, but it is something.

Champeau says Rogue Theater will be posting more of their skits in the coming weeks while encouraging others to produce their own while practicing social distancing.

Staying in touch can help with anxiety for elderly

Dealing with the fears surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic can make people, especially the elderly, more anxious.  During these unprecedented times, Sturgeon Bay Psychologist Dr. Dennis White of Sturgeon Bay says it is difficult to tell people to stay calm when they have concerns about their health and safety.  He says worrying is wasted mental energy and suggests using a coping mechanism.

 

 

Dr. White says it is essential for the elderly to stay connected.

 

 

People can use creative technologies, like video communications, to keep at least emotionally engaged with loved ones during physical isolation, according to Dr. White.

 

 

Full interview with Dr. White:

 

 

Supermarkets not limiting number of in-store shoppers

Local grocery stores in the area are not yet at the point of taking the measures Walmart imposed this past weekend in managing the COVID-19 crisis.  Walmart is allowing five customers for every 1,000 feet of shopping space and counting customers one by one before entering the store.  Jon Calhoun, store manager of Econofoods says Walmart’s store size would mean about a 500 customer limit.

 

 

Calhoun adds that Econofoods personnel and customers are told to keep social distancing in aisles and checkout areas.  Alex Stodola from Stodola’s IGA in Luxemburg, one of the largest stores in Kewaunee County, is also not keeping track of the number of shoppers entering the store.  They are asking that households send only one person to shop and to stay behind the plexiglass screen at checkout while practicing social distancing throughout the store and wearing masks as the CDC has recommended.

 

Supreme Court overrules Evers, election back on Tuesday; no extension of absentee voting

An executive order by Governor Tony Evers to postpone Tuesday’s statewide election was overruled by the Wisconsin Supreme Court.  In a 4-2 ruling, the court stated that Evers lacked the authority to change the election on his own to June.  Sister Bay Village Clerk Heidi Teich says they are prepared for an April 7th election with over 400 absentee ballots received and enough poll workers.

 

 

Evers had postponed the election until June 9 after Republicans, who control the Legislature, decided against any action to eliminate in-person voting amid the coronavirus crisis.  The U.S. Supreme Court also reportedly ruled Monday that absentee ballots must be mailed Tuesday to count.  They blocked extending the Wisconsin primary by six dayes because of COVID-19 pandemic.  The polls will open at 7 am Tuesday and close at 8 pm.  

 

Door County up to seven confirmed cases of COVID-19

One week from having the first confirmed case of the coronavirus, Door County now has seven positive tests of COVID-19.  Door County Public health released an updated report on Monday and is actively contacting individuals that have been determined to have had close contact with those who have positively tested for the virus.  As of 2 pm Monday, Door County has performed 131 tests with 80 having been negative and 44 still pending.  You can find the entire report by Door County Public Health with this story below. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DOOR COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH

COVID-19 SITUATION UPDATE

April 6, 2020

 

`

 

 

 

 

COVID-19 Confirmed Cases

 

Door County (as of 2pm on 4/6/20)

Tests Performed: 131

Positive: 6

Negative: 80

Pending: 45

Wisconsin (as of 2pm on 4/6/20)

Positive: 2,440

Negative: 26,574

Deaths: 77

 

 

Please take the “Safer at Home” guidelines seriously.  COVID-19 is spreading throughout Wisconsin.

The first case of COVID-19 was reported in Door County on March 30, 2020.

Please Note: According to experts, case counts only reflect a fraction (estimated 10%) of the total positive cases of COVID-19 present across the state.

Door County Public Health is actively responding to all cases of COVID 19. 

You will be contacted if it has been determined that you may have been in close contact with an infected person.

Travel to and from Door County is highly discouraged at this time. 

If you choose to return to Door County, Door County Public Health requests that you self-quarantine for a full 14 days.

Our best defense against COVID-19 is washing our hands frequently; avoiding touching our eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands; avoiding being around sick people; and physically distancing by staying at home.

NEW! Cloth face covers are recommended when individuals must leave the home to conduct essential activities, when sick, and for those who have seasonal allergies.

See CDC's advice on how to protect yourself from COVID-19.

 

 

 

All individuals in the state of Wisconsin are ordered to stay at home or at their place of residence, with limited exceptions. Individuals who are using shared or outdoor space other than their home or residence, must, at all times and to the extent possible, maintain social distancing of at least 6 feet from another person. Individuals do not need to maintain social distancing between family members in a single living unit or with other household members.

All individuals may leave their home or residence for a number of essential activities and functions including health and safety, such as picking up medications, visits with health care providers; obtaining groceries and food, buying gas or pet food, and other activities necessary to maintain the home or residence; outdoor activities, such as walking, biking, hiking or running while maintaining social distancing (does not include contact sports such as basketball); taking care of others, including friends and pets; and the travel associated with such tasks. See Emergency Order #12 for additional information.

See the Understanding "Safer at  Home" flyer and Safer at Home FAQs for more information.

 

 

DOOR COUNTY

April 6, 2020 - NEW! Use of Cloth Face Coverings to Help Slow the Spread of COVID-19

April 1, 2020 – Press Release - COVID-19 Update in Door County

March 31, 2020 -- Press Release- COVID 19 scam

March 31, 2020 – Press Release - Mental Wellness in the Face of COVID-19  

Visit and “Like” our Facebook page for current updates https://www.facebook.com/doorcountypublichealth/

United Way 211 Community Resource Guide

Door County Emergency Support Coalition: To request non-emergency assistance with services or have questions or call (920) 421-9111

 

STATE OF WISCONSIN

?April 6, 2020 - Gov. Evers Suspends In-Person Voting, Calls Legislature into Special Session on April 7 Election?

 

            COVID-19: Wisconsin Data

    Click on image to go to the WI Department of Health Services

 

 

 

 

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

Current Cases in the United States – 330,891

April 6, 2020 - NEW! Use of Cloth Face Coverings to Help Slow the Spread of COVID-19

April 6, 2020 - New COVIDView - A weekly surveillance summary of U.S. COVID-19 activity.

April 6, 2020 – Weekly Update DHS Response to Covid-19

March 26, 2020: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Situation Summary

March 11, 2020 – Press Release Census Bureau Statement on Coronavirus and the 2020 Census

 

 

Current Situational Report from the Centers of Disease and Control and Prevention

 

Click on the map to visit  Centers of Disease Control and Prevention site

 

 

WHAT TO DO IF YOU’RE FEELING SICK

 

Patients with COVID-19 can experience mild to severe respiratory illness.

 

If you are experiencing MILD or MODERATE symptoms, such as fever, runny nose or cough, do NOT go to the Emergency Room. Call your primary health care provider prior to going to a clinic.

Your primary care provider will evaluate if testing is necessary, and direct you to a facility that can conduct sampling.

This will ensure that healthcare professionals can prepare in advance should you need to receive testing or treatment. Seeking the most appropriate level of care will help protect the community and minimize exposure to other patients and staff.

 

If you have symptoms and feel you need testing call Door County Medical Center hotline at 920-746-3700.

 

If you are experiencing SEVERE illness, call your doctor's office immediately or go to the Emergency Room.  Call ahead and let them know you may have COVID-19 so they can be prepared.

 

Symptoms of SEVERE illness can include*:

Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath

Persistent pain or pressure in the chest

New confusion or inability to arouse

Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

 

If you are experiencing a medical emergency (you cannot breathe) call 911 and tell them if you believe you may have COVID-19.

 

If you do not have symptoms of COVID-19, you DO NOT need to be tested.

 

CDC recommendations for what to do if you are sick

Caring for yourself at home: 10 things to manage your health at home

Information for people at high risk of serious illness from COVID-19

 

PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COVID -19

 

 

 

Wash your hands often with soap and water. Use hand sanitizer if you do not have soap and water

Cover your nose and mouth when you cough or sneeze, and then throw the tissue away. If you do not have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your sleeve.

Do not have close contact with people who are sick and stay home if you are feeling sick.

Clean and disinfect surfaces thoroughly.

Practice social distancing which includes avoiding crowded places, increasing interpersonal space (ideally separation of 6 feet) and not shaking hands.

Don’t touch eyes or mouth with hands.

NEW! Use of Cloth Face Coverings to Help Slow the Spread of COVID-19

 

 

DOMESTIC TRAVEL GUIDANCE

DHS recommends Wisconsin residents cancel or postpone all nonessential travel, including travel within the state.

Travel between private homes within the state, including seasonal homes or rental cabins, is strongly discouraged.

Several counties in Wisconsin have issued travel advisories for seasonal and second homeowners. If you choose to travel to a second home in Wisconsin, you should be prepared to immediately self-quarantine for 14 days. You should bring your own groceries and essentials, as self-quarantine does not permit shopping at local stores for supplies.

 

WI Department of Health Services Travel Recommendations

 

List of states with Community Transmission

(click the + under the map)

 

 

 

ADDITIONAL GUIDANCE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepare at home

 

Community Events

 

Schools and Child Care

 

Business and Employers

 

Community and Faith Based

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-term Care Facilities

 

Law and First Responders

 

Higher Education

 

Volunteer

 

Medicare recipients and Medicare providers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Resources      

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) COVID-19 Information and Resources

Essential Business Listing: https://wedc.org/essentialbusiness/

Full Library of Print Resources for schools, businesses, etc. from the CDC

 

 

 

 

 

 

DOOR COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH FACEBOOK

 

WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES

 

CENTERS OF DISEASE CONTROL AND PREV

 

Exhibitors hope for fair season

Even if there are questions about whether or not the events will move forward because of the COVID-19 outbreak, fair families like the Wilkes say they are preparing for the best. The pandemic has forced the postponement and cancellation of many events this spring, some of which taking place as late as June and early July. That gets close for people planning on purchasing and working with their animal projects for local county fairs and the Wisconsin State Fair. Kevin Wilke from Wilke R Organic Farm in Sturgeon Bay says his daughters are expecting the arrival of their turkeys and sheep for this year’s Door County Fair. Until there is word there is not going to be a fair, Wilke knows his girls will prepare like there will be one.

The Wilke family shows several different animal projects during the Door County Fair, which is scheduled to take place July 29th through August 2nd.

Public Health Director: Kewaunee County has been lucky with COVID-19

Luck was the only explanation Kewaunee County Public Health Nurse Cindy Kinnard had for being one of the final 14 counties to be affected by COVID-19 until it reported its first confirmed case on Sunday. A patient in their 80s was hospitalized over the weekend with the virus and those in close contact with the person are being advised to self-quarantine for 14 days.  Without a testing site in Kewaunee County, patients have been sent to either Sturgeon Bay or Green Bay to find out if they have the virus or not.  Of the 62 people tested for COVID-19 from Kewaunee County, over 80 percent of them have come back with results. Kinnard says that is likely because many of their potential cases were placed at the top of the four-tier priority spectrum.

Kinnard says Kewaunee County Emergency Services Director Tracy Nollenberg has been looking into possible isolation centers if COVID-19 starts to cause havoc in the area, but there are no such plan as of now.  She adds that people should continue to practice social distancing and proper hygiene to help fend off the virus.

Water rescue, field fires makes up BUG's busy day

If Sundays are meant for rest, then thankfully the Brussels-Union-Gardner Fire Department did not get the memo this week.  For the second and third times in a week’s time, the B-U-G Fire Department responded to a pair of accidental fires that turned into something bigger when they began burning nearby fields. A cigarette was to blame for a 2 p.m. field fire near County XC in the town of Brussels while no cause has been determined for a 5 p.m. blaze near Town Hall Road in the town of Brussels. At around 3 p.m. the department received word about a person who fell out of their canoe in Little Sturgeon. The person, who was wearing a life jacket, was rescued by another boater. B-U-G Fire Chief Curt Vandertie says people need to take proper precautions since there still could be ice in the water.

Vandertie says he is proud of his department’s volunteers reporting the trio of incidents that resulted in no injuries.

 

Picture courtesy of the B-U-G- Fire Department

 

 

Sturgeon Bay bridges close for maintenance

The Wisconsin Department of Transportation is indirectly helping Door County residents with its social distancing efforts this week with a pair of bridge closures. On Tuesday and Wednesday, the Bayview Bridge in Sturgeon Bay will be closed completely to motorists from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. before the Maple/Oregon Street Bridge gets the same treatment on Thursday. Mark Kantola from the Wisconsin Department of Transportation says the inspections and maintenance is routine this time of year.

Kantola says there will be signage for a detour route all three days and the bridges will still be open for marine traffic.

Small business hit hard by coronavirus economic impact

Economist and Sturgeon Bay Mayor David Ward says that small businesses will feel the pinch from the current economic situation more so than larger competitors. Ward says they do not have the financial options to bridge a shutdown like corporations.

 


The Economic Policy Institute says 20 million jobs could be lost by the summer. Researchers at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, one of 12 district banks that set monetary policy for the country, say the number could be as high as 47 million by the end of June. On the low end, that would mark the worst unemployment rate in the post-World War II era for the United States. Wisconsin has had over 100,000 unemployment claims filed each of the past two weeks. That compares to around 5,200 applications per week this time last year. With many large corporations hiring as small businesses lay off employees, including Wal-Mart, they can be picky with who they add to their organizations. Small businesses face the prospect of having their best talent hired away by entities that already enjoyed competitive advantages against mom-and-pop shops. That could blunt their ability to participate in the eventual recovery.

 

Blood drive full up

The Door Peninsula has escaped the severe blood shortage that exists across large parts of the country. American Red Cross Team Supervisor Dori Meneghini says the organization should be able to build up supplies for later in the year through blood drives that are tightly controlled.

 


Social distancing has reduced the number of stations at area blood drives like the two held at the Door County YMCA this week, causing all slots to be filled by appointment only. Donors were met at a side entrance by volunteers wearing surgical masks who took their temperature before allowing them in which increased the screening time for each person. Together, those factors are keeping blood drives from needing walk-ins. Click here for a link to register for an upcoming blood drive.

Gun sales surging in the Door Peninsula

Firearm and ammo sales have risen to record levels nationwide, with sales clipping along at a brisk pace in Door and Kewaunee Counties as well. Scott Virlee, the owner of Virlee Gunworks in New Franken, says many customers in recent days are first-time buyers. Those looking for handguns must pass a background check conducted by the state, whereas long guns like rifles involve the federal system. Virlee says the state database is starting to strain due to the number of requests coming in.

 


Virlee says many buyers are arming themselves for self-defense purposes in these uncertain times.

 

Scramble to process unemployment claims

Hiring is happening at the unemployment office. Before the surge in applications of the past few weeks, layoffs trickled in across the State of Wisconsin, which allowed the Department of Workforce Development to get by with only 57 employees dedicated to unemployment insurance claims. This past Monday, traditionally the busiest day of the week, over 24,000 applications flooded in. Emily Savard, unemployment insurance communication liaison, says resources are being shifted from other departments to help, and hiring is expected soon.

 


Applications are filed online, with most entered correctly and processed by the state’s computer system without a human involved. Savard says the wait times have come when Workforce Development staff are needed to assist claimants. The online portal had a hiccup once in the past week, bogging down when 30,000 users attempted to access the site at one time.

 

*Photo of Sturgeon Bay Job Center.

 

Candy store hoping for last-minute online Easter sales

The Door County Candy Company in Sturgeon Bay, like other retailers, has shuttered its store because of the pandemic just as Easter is approaching.  The confectioner, however, has not written off one of its biggest money-making holidays.  Instead, the candy vendor is taking Easter orders via telephone and the internet.  Terry Ullman, the candy man at Door County Candy Company, says there are signs that online and phone orders will help customers with family celebrations while also making up for some lost in-store sales.

 

 

 

Ullman says the Door County Candy Company is also tailoring one of its popular offerings for those staying “Safer at Home”.

 

 

 

Ullman says the only thing sweeter for his candy store would be for the “Safer at Home” order to be lifted soon.

DCEDC surveys to gauge COVID19 economic impact

Door County businesses will have the chance to help plot recovery efforts from the COVID19 pandemic.  Surveys of local business owners are being conducted over the next three months to determine the economic impact from the outbreak.  They're part of a combined effort operated by the Door County Economic Development Corporation, the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation and UW-Oshkosh.  DCEDC Executive Director Steve Jenkins says the more that businesses take part in the surveys the better the ability to develop a recovery game plan.

 

 

 

The surveys are currently underway with other opportunities to take part in May and June. The surveys are currently underway with other opportunities to take part in May and June.  You can log onto the surveys here.

Kewaunee County reports first COVID-19 case, Door County two more

Approximately one week after Door County confirmed its first COVID-19 case, Kewaunee County is now doing the same.

 

According to a release from Kewaunee County Public Health Director Cindy Kinnard, the 80-year old patient was hospitalized over the weekend. It is the first confirmed case for Kewaunee County after 51 of its 62 residents tested negative for the virus with 10 tests still pending. Kewaunee County was one of the final fourteen counties in the state without a positive test until Sunday's announcement.

 

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services also updated the statewide total of positive COVID-19 cases to over 2,240, including four in Door County. That is two more positive tests for Door County since last Friday.

 

 

Zoombomb phenomenon affects Kewaunee County extension

The Land Rent Survey Webinar initially slated for this past Tuesday has been rescheduled for Thursday, April 16th, at 7 PM. The original attempt to hold the session had to be aborted due to a phenomenon known as Zoombombing. Zoom is a popular streaming service that allows for teleconferencing. It is being utilized by corporations, college professors, and the Kewaunee County Extension to avoid large gatherings. Think of it like photobombing, both involve unwanted guests except in this instance it occurs on a video platform. The ability to steal trade secrets from rival companies could be one consequence. For most, the threat comes when hackers gain access to account information and passwords. Many people use the same password on multiple services like Netflix or online banking.


Agriculture Agent Aerica Bjurstrom says security will be beefed up for the make-up webinar. The land rent survey was conducted from December to February, but Bjurstrom isn’t worried about the recent economic effects altering prices too much. She says those values have been relatively consistent for years. Bjurstrom is nervous about dairy farmers. She says milk dumping hasn’t been called for locally yet, but it is already becoming a common problem across the state.

 

Psychological damage from lost jobs may still be months away

Job losses are mounting locally, but it may be months before the worst is felt from a mental standpoint. William Nick, Counseling Associates of Door County Director, says that while a job loss can be shocking for the psyche, it is often harder for people to deal with missing out on the recovery when life returns to normal for others. It is that time period where Nick thinks psychologists will be needed most.

 


Jobs tend to become tied to an individual’s self-worth. Losing that is an obstacle that one could potentially be facing without the safety net of employer-provided health insurance. There are resources for those who are trying to cope with depression and its crippling side effects. 

 

Counseling Associates of Door County

 

Suicide Prevention Hotline

 

Maritime Museum uses virtual tour for homeschooling

The Door County Maritime Museum building is closed though its virtual tours are now adding some teaching opportunities for students and their parents as they go through homeschooling.  The museum is now posting video segments of the “Shipwrecks of Door County” exhibit on its website to provide some study activities that are also fun.  Executive Director Kevin Osgood says the online videos are designed to help students and parents alike with these unique educational experiences.

 

 

 

Such online resources had been in the Door County Maritime Museum's plans before the COVID19 outbreak.  The next offering for homeschooling will focus on the history of the Cana Island Lighthouse.  Students will be able to submit questions to museum staff members who'll provide answers in video snippets produced on the island.

Clutter in the night sky

Not since the days of Sputnik orbiting the planet have satellites been under so much scrutiny. Television and radio have been done by satellite for years, but that requires a small and well-defined number of deployments. SpaceX’s Starlink internet system involves a cloud of possibly up to 30,000 satellites in the coming years. Door Peninsula Astronomical Society President Dave Lenius says you can spot them with the naked eye from your backyard.

 


Astronomers argue that the Starlink network is a hindrance to stargazing and changes the night sky for the worse. SpaceX says it is taking steps to mitigate the visibility of its satellites. 

 

Stepping down on time

Kewaunee Board Chairman Robert Weidner hopes to hand the title to a successor later this month. Even with the changes to the election timeline, that should still be possible. U.S. District Court Judge William Conley ruled Thursday that absentee ballots can continue to be counted until April 13th. Results should be known by that date, which is over two weeks before the board’s organizational meeting, says Weidner.

 


Weidner and two other supervisors will not be seeking reelection, which means changes are in store regardless of the voting results.

 

Sketchbook challenge therapeutic during pandemic

A project previously scheduled by the Miller Art Museum in Sturgeon Bay is now being used as a tool to help participants get through the “Safer at Home” order.  The museum started a sketchbook challenge last month asking for drawings, photographs, poetry or observations from residents taking part in the project for posting to the museum's social media page.  Museum Executive Director Elizabeth Meissner-Gigstead says the project is focusing on helping people share how they're getting through the "getting through".

 

 

 

Meissner-Gigstead says such accounts prove the therapeutic value of the arts and provide a perspective for future generations.

 

 

 

Blank sketchbooks are available now and may be picked up from the literature box outside the south door of the Miller Art Museum office, on Nebraska Street. You're asked to take only one per participant.  Completed sketchbooks can be dropped off or mailed in after the pandemic subsides.

Cleaner homes can mean healthier families

The Centers for Disease Control have come down with everyday steps to clean and disinfect your home to protect you and your family.  The routine scrubbing of high touch surface areas including tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, faucets, sinks, and toilets.  John Hill of Ahnapee Hill Cleaning Services in Sturgeon Bay says when it comes to cleaning inside your home, a simple mixture of soap and water can work, besides the detergents or diluted bleach. 

 

 

Hill says having your carpets deep-cleaned by steam-method will also help to keep your home safer.  You can find information by the CDC on how to best clean and disinfect your house below.  


https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/disinfecting-your-home.html

 

Scouting carries on despite quarantine

You may not see them out camping or doing community service projects, but the scouting movement is still going strong in Door and Kewaunee Counties. Units within the Bay-Lakes Council and Girl Scouts of Northwestern Great Lakes have been able to meet virtually and still work on requirements towards earning new badges. Bay-Lakes Council Field Director Doug Ramsay says that even though some events like its Scouting for Food Drive had to be canceled, they have not been as affected as you might think.

Both Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts councils have hosted additional programming online to fill in the time where units and committees would usually meet. You can see some of those examples below.

 

 

Young turkey hunters goosed out of spring season

Hunter education classes have been postponed until at least April 24th, and that is leaving some hunters out in the cold during turkey season. For those over 18, the course is available online, but children are required to participate in Field Day. Those involve large groups with the itinerary comprised of hands-on activities as well as written exams. Conservation Warden Chris Kratcha says mentored hunts are the only way to let kids tag a tom until the “Safer at Home” order has been lifted.

 


Spring turkey hunting begins on April 15th with weekly sessions going until the end of May.

 

FLS Banners changes direction to help fight COVID-19

A Sturgeon Bay business has gone from outdoor signage and flags to masks and gowns.  FLS Banners made the transition earlier this week from trade show supplies to producing medical supplies to help with urgent needs for hospitals while still staying financially sustainable.  Due to the cancellation of national trade shows and sporting events, which was FLS’s primary source of income, owner Cain Goettleman decisively acted on three fronts.  He says his company’s experience in importing through a robust Asian supply-chain will allow the eventual production of NIOSH-Approved N95 masks very shortly.  Secondly, Goettleman says his staff came up with a creative way to make level one medical gowns.

 

 

Thirdly, Goettleman adds that FLS Banners has already come up with 40 personalized mask designs to help overcome the perceived stigma of wearing a mask in the U.S while helping to prevent the spread of COVID-19.  The multi-size masks are reversible and designed to contour-fit your face with a wire-bridge.

 

 

(photos submitted)

 

 

 

 

  

 

Christian performs "first music concert" in granary

A local musician performed a truly unique solo concert Friday at the historic Teweles & Brandeis Granary in Sturgeon Bay.  Despite the postponements of live concerts in front of audiences for the foreseeable future, Hans Christian played his 120-year-old German-made cello inside the 118-year-old structure in an impromptu, pop-up performance.  With the assistance of Christie Weber and Shawn Fairchild from the Sturgeon Bay Historical Society, Christian hoisted his cello into the rafters of the partially-stored building.  Overcoming his condition of vertigo and finding enough elbow-room to perform, Christian says the acoustics in the historic building was great.

 

 

Christian adds that he was improvising and not playing any arranged piece of music.  

 

 

Video of Hans Christian at granary

 

(Courtesy of Sturgeon Bay Historical Society)

 

 

Door County updates COVID-19 status

The Door County Public Health Department released updated numbers on the COVID-19 situation on Friday afternoon.  Two residents tested positive since Monday of this past week in the county and have been in isolation since first being tested.   As of 2 pm Friday, 117 tests have been performed.  Of those tests, 68 were negative, and 47 are still pending.  Statewide, the numbers reflect 1,912 positive cases with 22,377 negative tests and 37 deaths.  The “Safer at Home” guidelines state orders all individuals in Wisconsin to stay at home or their place of residence, with limited exceptions. Individuals who are using shared or outdoor space other than their home or residence must, at all times and, to the extent possible, maintain social distancing of at least 6 feet from another person.  You can find the complete guidelines online with this story.

 

 

 

FAQ of COVID-19 order by Governor Evers

 

 

 

 

Districts prepare for no more students

It is beginning to look like students in Door and Kewaunee Counties may not return to the classroom this school year. Deputy State Superintendent Mike Thompson sent out the letter from State Superintendent Carolyn Stanford Taylor to district administrators on Tuesday to thank them for their efforts during this unusual time and asked them to prepare for the possibility of no more in-person instruction this school year. The state has told districts they would still need to provide remote and virtual learning opportunities to students until they are allowed back into the buildings or the last scheduled day of classes. Sturgeon Bay School District Superintendent Dan Tjernagel says it is disheartening for teachers and staff to think students may not be roaming the hallways again this school year, but it is still too early to tell what will happen.

As for the high school seniors, Tjernagel says he and other superintendents leave it up to the principals and the students to decide if and when those events are held, even if that means they take place in the summer months.

Law enforcement keeping track of social distancing

Law enforcement personnel in Door and Kewaunee Counties are reminding people about possible violations of Governor Tony Evers’ Safer at Home order. Incident reports show the Door County Sheriff’s Department has responded to seven order violations since it went into effect March 24th. It has been less than that in Kewaunee County, but the Kewaunee Police Department is telling anglers to give themselves plenty of space while sucker and smelt fishing or else they will be forced to close the pier down. Kewaunee Police Chief Jim Kleiman says they have been more informative with their approach to possible order violations.

Citations issued for violating the governor’s order could include a fine of up to $500 and at least 30 days in jail. 

Response fund distributes nearly $36,000

Six local groups will be able to serve the community better after the Door County Emergency Response Fund made its first charitable distribution on Thursday. The fund distributed nearly $36,000 in aid to cover expenses for food, shelter, and other needs for the Boys and Girls Club of Door County, the Washington Island Community Health Program, the Door County Meals Cooperative, HELP of Door County, the Door County Medical Center Foundation, and the Door County Fire Chief’s Relief Fund. Door County Community Foundation President and CEO Bret Bicoy knows more public charities and faith-based organizations are struggling at this time meeting the area’s needs. He has been encouraged by the groups indirectly working together to support the community as a whole.

Bicoy says they will make other distributions in the coming weeks as they continue to raise money for the Door County Emergency Response Fund, which has raised close to $135,000 since it was relaunched last month.

Election period extended, not canceled

UPDATE: Governor Tony Evers has called for a special session of the Wisconsin Legislature to address the April 7th election at 4 p.m. Saturday. You can read more about his executive order by clicking this link.  He is calling for the entire election to be mail-in, something the Door and Kewaunee County Clerks expressed their opinions on last week at DoorCountyDailyNews.com.

 

Wisconsin’s spring election is still a go, but voters in Door and Kewaunee Counties will have a little extra time to get their voice heard. U.S. District Judge William Conley chose not to cancel Tuesday’s election but rather gave absentee voters a break when it came to making sure their vote counted. In addition to giving voters an extra day to register absentee, Conley’s ruling gave clerks until April 13th to count votes and people the ability to submit their mail-in ballots without a witness signature. Given the unusual circumstances, Door County Clerk Jill Lau says there are still a lot of details to sort out.

State and national leaders from the Republican Party appealed the decision, so some of the details are still subject to change. As of Thursday, less than 45 percent of the 9,571 absentee ballots requested by voters in Door and Kewaunee Counties have been returned.

Investment strategy during the volatile stock market

A Sturgeon Bay financial advisor says the volatile stock market the past month is a good reminder to always plan for the long haul when it comes to investments. The Dow Jones experienced another wild session Thursday before closing up 469.93 points, finishing at 21,413.44.  Casey St. Henry from Thrivent Financial says no matter what the stock market is doing, a good rule of thumb is to invest long term.

 

 

Experts say the market correction is continuing as the Labor Department announced that unemployment claims jumped to 6.6 million last week.  St. Henry adds that before investing in the stock market or your portfolio, you should work with a professional financial advisor in developing retirement strategies and goals.

 

"Thank Them" campaign started in Door County

A grassroots community effort to thank all essential workers in Door County is gaining traction as colorful ribbons and red hearts are already popping up in neighborhoods.  Henk and Buttons Wolst of Jacksonport and Dick and Barb Allmann of Sturgeon Bay started an initiative called “Thank Them.”  
Henk Wolst says after discussing ideas, the nationally-recognized “scrub blue” ribbons on trees and mailboxes for health care workers grew into a broader show of support.

 


Wolst says people can improvise if they don’t have ribbon, and use wrapping paper and cut-out hearts and tape it on windows and doors. He says although the initial plan was to kick the “Thank Them” campaign off on Monday, people are encouraged to display ribbons and hearts around Door County right away.  

 

 

(photos submitted)

 

 

 

 

 

Families, facilities adapt to challenges of socializing

Assisted care providers are trying to fill the void left by not allowing visitors and family to visit loved ones inside due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  Anna’s Healthcare in Sturgeon Bay currently has 59 people that reside at the facility.   Tama Bagley, administrator and owner, says her staff and residents have adjusted well to the lockdown and the residents are still enjoying a sense of community.  She notes the positive ways families are staying in touch. 

 

 

Bagley sees the recent correspondences as a step back in time with more mail and flower deliveries.  She adds that Anna’s Healthcare is helping families connect on through social media as well.

 


Bagley says Anna’s Healthcare’s staff is also providing hair styling and nail polish services which adds more one-on-one time with residents.  

 

(photo courtesy of Anna's Healthcare facebook) 

 

Flea & tick season approaching for pets

Pet owners should be proactive in protecting their furry friends from the hazards of certain insects as they spend more time in the outdoors this spring and summer. Dr. Jordan Kobilca from Door County Veterinary Hospital and the Luxemburg Pet Clinic recommends heartworm prevention year-round for your pet.  The flea and tick prevention should be through the late fall. He suggests some tips on keeping your pet safe.

 

 

Common signs of flea and tick presence on your pet can include excessive scratching, licking or biting at the skin, hair loss, scabs, and pale gums. You can find more information on the recommended flea and tick prevention for your pet with this story online.

 

Baldwin leaves shutdown advice to health experts

Public health experts should have a heavy influence on when COVID-19-related restrictions are lifted according to Wisconsin Democratic U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin. President Donald Trump extended social distancing guidelines earlier this week to April 30th. Over 30 states including Wisconsin are under stay-at-home orders for at least the next few weeks while some are encouraging a shutdown until May or even June. Baldwin says decisions about lifting such orders should be made with sound health expertise.

Republican U.S. Rep. Mike Gallagher and U.S Senator Ron Johnson both agree that efforts to control the coronavirus should be taken, but they have also called for strategic ways to do so in efforts to help the economy.

 

Click the link to read more: Gallagher hopes to get state moving again

COVID-19 scams spreading

COVID-19 is the latest target of scammers across the country, including a recent case in Door County. Earlier this week the Door County Sheriff’s Department was steered towards a case of fraud through e-mail as the suspect posed as a town official trying to get donations for COVID-19 efforts. The e-mail was immediately recognized as a potential scam and the Door County Sheriff’s Department already has a lead on who may be the owner of the email address used in the potential crime. Like any scam, Chief Deputy Pat McCarty says you should be careful of who is contacting you and why they are reaching out.

Three government agencies are trying to get ahead of other potential scams related to the coronavirus. The Federal Trade Commission and Food and Drug Administration have warned seven companies about unsupported claims about virus protection. The Internal Revenue Service is also telling the public to be aware of scams related to the stimulus checks arriving in the coming weeks.

Comparing pandemics not easy

Door County Chief Medical Officer Dr. Jim Heise has been on the front lines of a pandemic before and believes COVID-19 is a much different foe. Heise treated many patients when the H1N1 virus, also known as the swine flu, caused havoc around the world, including thousands of cases in Wisconsin. He says COVID-19 seems to be more infectious than the H1N1 virus and there are not as many answers to it yet.

Door County confirmed its second case of COVID-19 Wednesday afternoon out of 108 people tested. Forty-nine tests have come back negative with all others still pending. Heise recommends following the Centers for Disease Control’s recommendations of keeping your social distance from other people, washing your hands, and limiting your travel to help slow the spread.

Lenten confessions down

Even the pastor of two Catholic churches in Kewaunee County confesses the number of people participating in the sacrament of reconciliation is down due to COVID-19 limitations. Asking for the forgiveness of sins is a major part of the Catholic faith during Lent, but social distancing and a ban on mass gatherings have forced parishes to get creative.  Pastor Dan Schuster of St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Luxemburg and Holy Trinity Parish in Casco has moved the sacrament out of the traditional confessional booth and into the main sanctuary behind makeshift walls. He understands why some people have stayed away, but Schuster hopes people still make the time.

While some like St. Mary’s and the National Shrine of Our Lady of Good Help are continuing to hold confessions at posted times with restrictions, other churches are opting to hold the sacrament via drive-through, by appointment, or they canceled them altogether. The U.S. Bishops’ Committee on Divine Worship announced last week that administering the sacrament over the phone was not allowed under church teachings.

Local birdwatching could skyrocket in popularity 

Area birdwatching popularity may just see an increase during this spring with most activities restricted to around the home.  Reportedly more than 45 million people enjoyed birdwatching in the last year.  Algoma formed a Bird City committee in April of 2012 and is celebrating its 7th anniversary of Bird City Wisconsin status on May 4th.  Committee member Sue Hepp says there are many different birds in the area that people can enjoy watching and even capture with photography.

 

 

Despite the canceled “Birds Connect Our World” International Migratory Bird Day celebration which was planned for Saturday, April 18, local residents can still enjoy the hobby of birdwatching this spring.

 

Olympics postponement cheered by most athletes

A local athlete says the International Olympics Committee’s decision to postpone the games to 2021 is the right thing to do. The decision came after several countries, including the United States, lobbied for the move.  Conner McHugh, originally from Sturgeon Bay and a former swimmer at the University of Minnesota, says health comes first. With most pools closed athletes cannot prepare for the demands of qualifying.

 


McHugh notes the announcement is bittersweet for some. While it may be the right thing to do, athletes who have graduated college often find themselves unable to afford to train at an Olympic level because sports like swimming don’t have established professional leagues. 

 

2nd case of COVID-19 confirmed in Door County

The second COVID-19 case has been confirmed in Door County according to local health officials.  As in the first case, both residents have had travel outside of Door County.  Both individuals have been in isolation since their testing.  One individual had traveled out of the state and in accordance with the law, no names will be released.   Door County Public Health is contacting anyone who may have been in close contact with either infected person.  Public health officials remind people of the importance of following the CDC guidelines on social distancing and maintaining good hand washing to prevent the spread of the virus.  All travel to and from Door County is highly discouraged. Door County Public Health reports that there have been a total of 108 tests performed in the county with 49 total negative results as of Wednesday.  You can find the complete news release with this story below.

  

 

 

As of today, a total of two Door County residents have tested positive for COVID 19. Both individuals are known to have had travel outside of Door County. One resident traveled to surrounding counties within the state of Wisconsin, and one resident traveled outside of the state. Both individuals have been in isolation since the date of testing. In accordance with privacy laws, no other information about these cases can or will be shared with the public. 

Door County Public Health is actively responding to all cases of COVID 19. You will be contacted if it has been determined that you may have been in close contact with an infected person. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, close contact is defined as being less than 6 feet of a COVID- 19 case for a prolonged period of time; close contact can occur while caring for, living with, visiting, or sharing a healthcare waiting area or room with a COVID-19 case or having direct contact with infectious secretions of a COVID-19 case (e.g., being coughed on). 

Identifying a positive case in Door County is not unexpected. It is also expected that more cases will be identified. Refer to the Door County Situational Report for current case counts. It is important to know that case counts reflect a fraction of the total cases in any county as not all patients with COVID-19 symptoms are tested. 

These cases should serve to remind all of us about the importance of following the CDC Guidelines on social distancing and maintaining good hand washing to prevent the spread of disease. The entire community is urged to support these efforts. Slowing spread of COVID-19 is necessary to keep from overwhelming our health care system and protecting those most at risk of serious illness. 

Travel to and from Door County is highly discouraged. We know that COVID 19 is spreading throughout the United States and Wisconsin. If you choose to return to Door County, Door County Public Health requests that you quarantine for a full 14 days. Although there is no enforceable action regarding travel, Governor Evers “Safer at Home” order prohibits all non-essential travel. 

 

Current Cases in Door County:

2

as of 4/1/2020

Total Tests Performed in Door County:

108

as of 4/1/2020

Total Negative Results Reported in Door County:

49

as of 4/1/2020

Current Cases in Wisconsin:

1550

as of 4/1/2020

Current Cases in United States:

186,101

as of 4/1/2020

 

Please take the “Safer at Home” guidelines seriously.  COVID-19 is spreading throughout Wisconsin.

 

The first case of COVID-19 was reported in Door County on March 30, 2020. Social distancing and hand washing are crucial to slowing the spread. The entire community is urged to support these efforts. Slowing spread of COVID-19 is necessary to keep from overwhelming our health care system and protecting those most at risk of serious illness.

 

DOOR COUNTY

 

STATE OF WISCONSIN

A screenshot of a computer

Description automatically generated

 

 

 

 

 

Coronavirus scaring away poll workers

The City of Sturgeon Bay is looking for poll workers. Tuesday’s election will be a bit different across Wisconsin, with a majority of voters having registered for absentee ballots, but polling locations are still open, and they must be staffed. Poll workers tend to be older, the group most vulnerable to exposure from the coronavirus, and it is feared many will back out. Clerk Stephanie Reinhardt says the uncertainty makes it hard to know how many workers they’ll need.

 


A training session is scheduled for Thursday morning in the council chambers. Due to limited space, Reinhardt recommends that those interested in attending call beforehand to make sure they can be accommodated.

 

Gallagher hopes to get state moving again

Recognizing the seriousness of the COVID-19 outbreak does not mean Wisconsin Republican Rep. Mike Gallagher wants the state to stay at a standstill for long. In the last week, the United States Congress passed a $2 trillion stimulus bill to help get the economy moving again while President Donald Trump extended the coronavirus safety guidelines to April 30th.  Speaking before last week’s stimulus vote, Rep. Gallagher said he would like to see a middle of the road approach that observes social distancing and other safety measures while also getting things a little closer to normal.

Some of those ideas outlined in a recent op-ed in the Wisconsin State Journal included more strategic quarantines, surge support to the frontlines fighting the virus, and even having kids do what it takes to make up for lost time in the classroom. We will have additional comments from Democratic Senator Tammy Baldwin about the coronavirus on Thursday.

Dairy farmers absorb another blow

Schools closing and restaurants running limited hours are taking its toll on dairy farmers in Door and Kewaunee Counties. After climbing up to $18.00 per hundredweight for Class 3 Milk Futures in late January, the CME Group has the price tumbling to $13.05 for the same product. Ever since the recession brought milk prices down to between $9 and $12 in 2008 and 2009, some farmers have invested public and private programs to help guarantee the amount they can make. Dave Jauquet, owner of Luxemburg’s Jauquet Hillview Dairy, credits he and his wife Stacy’s strict use of the programs for helping his 600-cow operation weather the economic downturns.

While dairy farming has presented its fair share of challenges in recent years, Jauquet says producing a high-quality product for consumers encourages him to work hard every day. Farmers may also get a boost from the stimulus bill which earmarked $9.5 billion to support producers.

Children's center to stay open

Northern Door Children’s Center in Sister Bay will hit the reset button this week after Door County reported its first positive test of COVID-19. The center’s Board of Directors chose to close the facility for a week, but will reopen on April 6th for all of its families still in need of child care. Karen Corekin-DeLaMer from the Northern Door Children’s Center says their 3K and 4K classes will have remote learning opportunities made available to them.

Corekin-DeLaMer says Northern Door Children’s Center will only close again if there is a close contact case of COVID-19 that directly affects their staff and students. The Door County YMCA’s Barker Child Development Center went through a similar situation earlier this month when it closed its doors to the general public before offering their services to the families of essential workers.

COVID-19 Food Safety Series: Protecting your produce

Are you concerned about the virus contaminating your fresh produce? Do we continue to eat fresh fruits and vegetables? The answer is yes. There is no reason to assume that fresh fruits and vegetables are unsafe. Regardless of where the produce is from, fruits and vegetables are a healthy part of the diet. 

 

We know that the COVID-19 virus doesn’t appear to last long on organic surfaces like the outside of fruits and vegetables, and it doesn’t appear that we can get sick from ‘eating’ the virus. But there are some general food safety steps that we always recommend when eating or preparing fresh fruits and vegetables. 

 

Start by washing your hands, then rinse all fresh fruits and vegetables with clean running water and dry with a paper towel before you eat or prepare them. Scrub the surfaces of melons, apples or other firm items.  If you want an added safety step, dip rinsed fruits and vegetables in a vinegar solution of 2 cups vinegar + 2 cups water, allow to stand for 1 minute, then rinse again with clean water and dry with a paper towel. Research has shown that this vinegar rinse will help remove harmful bacteria like Salmonella. Whether the vinegar rinse will destroy the coronavirus, we don’t yet know but we do know that it won’t hurt.

State award helps employed Door-Tran clients

Underemployed Door County residents will continue to get help to ensure they have reliable transportation to their jobs.  Door-Tran received $26,763 through the  Wisconsin Employment Training Assistance Program, which was part of a $1.7-million award program for county and local transit operations.  Nikki Voight, Interim Director of Door-Tran, says that it will aid working people who need a second chance when facing transportation issues.

 

 

Voight says Door-Tran does about eight-to-ten loans yearly.  For more information, you can contact the Door-Tran office on Egg Harbor Road in Sturgeon Bay.

Price at the pump continues to fall

Gas prices at the pump continue to drop in Door and Kewaunee County.  Prices fell to below $2.00 per gallon in early March and now are as low as $1.49 as of Tuesday for regular unleaded gasoline.  Governor Evers “Safer at Home” order last week calls for the elimination of all non-essential travel.  With demand decreasing and the overseas crude oil price wars, prices continue to plummet.  The current price of WTI crude oil is at just over $20 a barrel which is the lowest since 2002.  Parv Jandu, who owns eight Jandu Petroleum convenience stores in the area, says the volatility of the stock market is also driving the price down.  The average price of a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline in Wisconsin is $1.57 per gallon, according to AAA.  Gasbuddy.com reports prices in the state as low as 97 cents a gallon in Wautoma as of Tuesday.    

Outside exercise still a great option for kids 

Finding the right exercise routine for young children can be challenging for parents as area schools remain closed throughout the state.  Luxemburg-Casco Intermediate School Physical Education teacher Neil Seering has developed a weekly slide show and video to share interactive exercise programs and ideas for his students to stay active.  He encourages families to take this opportunity to do outside activities.

 

 

You can find this week’s plan by Seering for Physical Education at Home Activities with this link below.

 

 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1YKeW5Kj1LkC9d6GVTozGareSeFofpijYgCoFsEhnlWI/edit?usp=sharing

 

Benefits of martial arts shared

Dan Barnard of Sturgeon Bay takes time to appreciate the benefits that go along with learning and teaching martial arts.  A black belt in Karate and TaeKwonDo through the Door County YMCA, the 42-year-old Barnard received his Tae Kwon Do belt three years ago, and his Karate black belt back in high school.  Barnard experienced other instructors in college and eventually taught Tae Kwon Do at the YMCA.  He says that martial arts can be a very rewarding achievement.

 

 

Barnard says it takes discipline and a high level of technique to advance through the ranks.  He adds that the martial arts help with controlling your body while giving you strength and flexibility.  Plans are for Barnard to organize female self-defense courses in the future in Door County.  

Search Our Site

Current Weather

STURGEON BAY WEATHER

CANCELLATIONS

Poll

Are you in favor of the development of a proposed quarry in the town of Gardner?
Add a Comment
(Fields are Optional)

Your email address is never published.

Sports Poll

How many games will the Wisconsin Badgers win this season?
Add a Comment
(Fields are Optional)

Your email address is never published.

Birthday Club

Obituaries are provided as a service of the

Schinderle Funeral Home of Algoma

Obituaries

Click Here for more Obituaries

Obituary posting fee is $25

Newsletter

Sign up for our Daily Electronic Newspaper!

Get the latest news with our Daily Electronic Newspaper delivered to your inbox.

Get the latest updates for Big Deals delivered to your inbox every Monday, Wednesday & Friday.